Women in the Wind (1939)

63 or 65 mins | Drama | 15 April 1939

Director:

John Farrow

Producer:

Bryan Foy

Cinematographer:

Sid Hickox

Editor:

Thomas Pratt

Production Designer:

Carl Jules Weyl

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

According to the Var review, this was Kay Francis' last picture under her Warner Bros. contract. Although HR production charts list actor Harvey Stephens in the cast, his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Many contemporary reviews mention the fact that Eddie Foy's character, "Denny Corson," was inspired by famous aviator Douglas "Wrong Way" Corrigan. For more information on Corrigan, see above entry for The Flying Irishman . A HR pre-release news item notes that Warner Bros. sent a film crew to Cleveland, OH, to film shots of an air derby for the ... More Less

According to the Var review, this was Kay Francis' last picture under her Warner Bros. contract. Although HR production charts list actor Harvey Stephens in the cast, his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Many contemporary reviews mention the fact that Eddie Foy's character, "Denny Corson," was inspired by famous aviator Douglas "Wrong Way" Corrigan. For more information on Corrigan, see above entry for The Flying Irishman . A HR pre-release news item notes that Warner Bros. sent a film crew to Cleveland, OH, to film shots of an air derby for the picture. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Jan 39
p. 3.
Film Daily
21 Apr 39
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Sep 38
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 38
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Sep 38
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 38
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jan 39
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
3 Jan 39
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
4 Feb 39
p. 64.
New York Times
13 Apr 39
p. 27.
Variety
1 Feb 39
p. 13.
Variety
19 Apr 39
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Scr
Contr wrt
Contr to trmt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Women in the Wind by Francis Walton (New York, 1935).
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 April 1939
Production Date:
September 1938
additional filming began early December 1938
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 April 1939
Copyright Number:
LP8770
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
63 or 65
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4704
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

It is imperative that aviatrix Janet Steele win the Burbank to Cleveland women's air derby so that she can pay for a vital operation for her brother Bill, a former racing pilot who was crippled in an air crash. At stake is a $15,000 grand prize, money Janet desperately needs, because her banker, Mr. Palmer, refuses to loan her any more money. Janet calls on her old friend, flyer Kit Campbell, who is also entered in the race, to introduce her to Ace Boreman, who has just smashed the cross-country flight mark. Certain that Ace's airplane can beat any other, Janet does everything in her power to convince him that she is a capable flyer, including feigning ignorance about flying and then stealing his airplane to show off her flying skills. Though Ace is initially angered over the stunt, Janet manages to win him over with her natural charm, and once they become friends, Janet flies Ace out to her farm and introduces him to her brother. Ace immediately recognizes the famous aviator, and after Janet pressures Ace to agree to let her fly his airplane, Ace tells her that he would have gladly done her that favor without being shamed into it. Complications arise, however, when Ace's estranged wife Frieda appears and announces that their Mexican divorce has been declared illegal, therefore making her part owner of the airplane, which she intends to fly in the derby. Not wanting to disappoint Janet, Ace convinces his friend, Denny Corson, who was recently celebrated for having flown his airplane across the Atlantic backwards and owes Ace a big favor, to lend Janet his plane. ... +


It is imperative that aviatrix Janet Steele win the Burbank to Cleveland women's air derby so that she can pay for a vital operation for her brother Bill, a former racing pilot who was crippled in an air crash. At stake is a $15,000 grand prize, money Janet desperately needs, because her banker, Mr. Palmer, refuses to loan her any more money. Janet calls on her old friend, flyer Kit Campbell, who is also entered in the race, to introduce her to Ace Boreman, who has just smashed the cross-country flight mark. Certain that Ace's airplane can beat any other, Janet does everything in her power to convince him that she is a capable flyer, including feigning ignorance about flying and then stealing his airplane to show off her flying skills. Though Ace is initially angered over the stunt, Janet manages to win him over with her natural charm, and once they become friends, Janet flies Ace out to her farm and introduces him to her brother. Ace immediately recognizes the famous aviator, and after Janet pressures Ace to agree to let her fly his airplane, Ace tells her that he would have gladly done her that favor without being shamed into it. Complications arise, however, when Ace's estranged wife Frieda appears and announces that their Mexican divorce has been declared illegal, therefore making her part owner of the airplane, which she intends to fly in the derby. Not wanting to disappoint Janet, Ace convinces his friend, Denny Corson, who was recently celebrated for having flown his airplane across the Atlantic backwards and owes Ace a big favor, to lend Janet his plane. Ace decides not to tell Janet how he helped her, and as preparations for the race begin, Janet is convinced that Ace has turned his back on her. The flyers take their places for the start of the race, but before it begins, the jealous Frieda agrees to be a party to the sabotaging of Janet's plane. The race gets underway, and the two women are pitted against each other, flying neck and neck all the way. After refueling in Wichita, Janet's sabotaged fuel tank loses gas and she is forced to land on a farm. Fortunately, a kindly farmer gives her gas and she is able to continue. As they approach the Cleveland air field, Frieda notices that Janet has lost her landing gear and, having a change of heart, sacrifices her own chance of winning by signaling to Janet and helping her avoid a crash landing. With Frieda's assistance, Janet lands her plane safely and wins the race. When Janet learns that Ace was on her side all along, and when Frieda presents him with a telegram informing him that lawyers have determined that his Mexican divorce has been upheld, Janet realizes she has won more than just a race, she has won Ace. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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