Full page view
HISTORY

As with most of director John Carpenter’s films, Escape From New York has the alternate “complete title,” John Carpenter’s Escape From New York , under which it is copyrighted.
       In the closing credits, costume designer Stephen Loomis’ name is misspelled as “Steven Loomis.” End credits contain a “Special Thanks” to the following organizations and individuals: The City of St. Louis; The City of New York; The National Guard of Missouri; The United States Army Reserve; Mr. Walter Abell; Lt. Col. Dennis R. Foley; The Orient Express, and P.T.’s, Centerville.
       While actor Joe Unger received credit for the role, “Taylor,” he did not appear in the final cut of the film. The character appeared in an early robbery sequence with Snake, but test screening audiences rejected the film’s lengthy opening. The sequence was later included as an added feature on the “Special Edition” home video version.
       According to production notes, Carpenter conceived the premise for Escape From New York after his first trip to Manhattan, which exposed him to seedier parts of the city. With the inspiration of a “completely ruined New York,” Carpenter wrote the first draft of the script in 1974. He then put the script aside for six years, only revisiting it in 1980 when Avco Embassy green-lit the project. In an interview with Gilles Boulenger, author of the book John Carpenter The Prince of Darkness , Carpenter revealed that Avco Embassy picked up Escape From New York as a substitute for The Philadelphia Experiment , a script he was having trouble completing. Production notes stated that Carpenter then brought in long time friend and ... More Less

As with most of director John Carpenter’s films, Escape From New York has the alternate “complete title,” John Carpenter’s Escape From New York , under which it is copyrighted.
       In the closing credits, costume designer Stephen Loomis’ name is misspelled as “Steven Loomis.” End credits contain a “Special Thanks” to the following organizations and individuals: The City of St. Louis; The City of New York; The National Guard of Missouri; The United States Army Reserve; Mr. Walter Abell; Lt. Col. Dennis R. Foley; The Orient Express, and P.T.’s, Centerville.
       While actor Joe Unger received credit for the role, “Taylor,” he did not appear in the final cut of the film. The character appeared in an early robbery sequence with Snake, but test screening audiences rejected the film’s lengthy opening. The sequence was later included as an added feature on the “Special Edition” home video version.
       According to production notes, Carpenter conceived the premise for Escape From New York after his first trip to Manhattan, which exposed him to seedier parts of the city. With the inspiration of a “completely ruined New York,” Carpenter wrote the first draft of the script in 1974. He then put the script aside for six years, only revisiting it in 1980 when Avco Embassy green-lit the project. In an interview with Gilles Boulenger, author of the book John Carpenter The Prince of Darkness , Carpenter revealed that Avco Embassy picked up Escape From New York as a substitute for The Philadelphia Experiment , a script he was having trouble completing. Production notes stated that Carpenter then brought in long time friend and fellow filmmaker, Nick Castle, to help with re-writes. The script was finalized in the spring of 1980.
       Escape From New York reunited a number of key players from Carpenter’s Halloween (1978, see entry), including producers Debra Hill and Larry Franco, actor Donald Pleasence, and writer Castle. The film also marked the second collaboration between Carpenter and then-wife, Adrienne Barbeau, who made her theatrical debut the previous year in Carpenter’s The Fog (1980, see entry). Production notes indicated that Carpenter wrote the film’s lead role, “Snake Plissken,” specifically for Kurt Russell. Additionally, he wrote the characters “Cabbie” for veteran actor Ernest Borgnine, “Maggie” for Adrienne Barbeau, and the small role identified in the film’s closing credits as “Girl in Chock Full O’Nuts," originally identified in the script by the character name “Maureen,” for young actress Season Hubley.
       Production notes stated that shooting began in late summer, 1980, with a $7 million budget co-financed by AEPC, International Film Investors, Inc., and Goldcrest Films International. The budget was the largest either Carpenter or Hill had ever worked with, and the shooting schedule, which lasted three months, was their longest and most “logistically complex,” to date. According to a 15 Oct 1980 Var article, the production employed a 180-person, fully union crew, another benchmark for Carpenter and Hill, who were used to smaller crews of either non-union or partially unionized personnel.
       According to production notes, the film shot in St. Louis, MO, Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, and Atlanta, GA. Location manager Barry Bernardi selected St. Louis to double for Manhattan due to the city’s eager cooperation, its aesthetic similarity to a “major east coast city,” and its proximity to the Chain of Rocks Bridge, which was conveniently closed and could double as New York City’s famed 69th Street Bridge. In a 24 Oct 1980 HR news item, Carpenter elaborated on the selection of St. Louis as a surrogate locale for New York: “St. Louis, due to a major fire they had there in 1977, now just has the right amount of emptiness in the downtown area. Also the right architecture. So much of the city looks vacant and dead; perfect for our needs since we couldn’t use anything looking new or fresh.” St. Louis’ Union Train Station simulated Madison Square Garden, while the city’s downtown area, after being littered with “junked cars” and trash, became the decrepit streets of a 1997 Manhattan. Four separate locales in Los Angeles were used to recreate the World Trade Center, and Liberty Island was among the New York City shooting sites. Atlanta’s MARTA mass-transit system, which was originally featured in the film as a “futuristic trans-continental train,” was cut from the final edit.
       Production notes stated that Production Designer Joe Alves created a series of “dichotomous sets,” in accordance with design outlines in the script, which contrasted the clean and severe look of the United States Police Force environments with that of the “medieval, reverted landscape” inside the prison. Production notes identified a number of sets with particularly challenging design needs, among those the Air Force One crash site, the United States Police Force’s central control center, and a 33-foot-high, 200-foot-long portion of the prison’s containment wall, which took over a month to construct. Alves also helped design a robot and the Presidential escape pod.
       Costume Designer Stephen Loomis relied partially on items found at city dumps for the “trash clothes” worn by prison inmates, who would have likely found their clothing in dumpsters. For Snake Plissken’s outfit, Loomis imagined what “1997 camouflage fatigues” would look like, if they were intended to allow Snake to blend into the “burnt-out, decaying prison/city.”
       Director of Photography Dean Cundey reunited with Carpenter for the fourth time on Escape from New York . On the set, Cundey introduced a “computerized light modulator,” which he and Joy Brown had invented and built. Using the modulator for the first time ever, Cundey was able to mimic the light patterns of fire instead of relying on actual fire during photography. Cundey also utilized a Panaglide image stabilization rig, which he helped popularize on Carpenter’s Halloween , for aproximately 25 percent of the production to capture the smooth moving camera shots indicative of the technology.
       A 15 Oct 1980 Var article noted that the two months following principle photography were reserved for editing, scoring and mixing, and ongoing special effects work at Roger Corman’s Venice, CA, studio, to be concluded by Apr or May in preparation for a Jul 1981 release date. According to production notes, Corman’s New World Pictures utilized a number of different optical effects, including “matte paintings, glass paintings, 3D models, time-lapse photography, and model animation” to create all of the film’s special effects. Among the models built was a “ten-foot by ten-foot scale miniature” of Manhattan, with surrounding water, and Brooklyn visible in the distance. Roy Arbogast oversaw the “live” effects, such as explosions and the operation of mechanical devices like the President’s escape pod. Arbogast and Carpenter would work together again on a number of future projects, including Carpenter’s follow-up film, the special effects-heavy The Thing (1982, see entry).
       According to a Jun 1981 Millimeter article, the Elicon Camera Control System was used to capture roughly 12 to 14 special effects segments, including the sequence in which Snake pilots a jet glider down Wall Street. The exceedingly precise “computer-controlled camera movement repetition device,” which earned its developers, Peter Regla and Dan Slater, an Academy Award in Technical Achievement, allowed for the creation of in-camera mattes. In Escape From New York , the device was predominantly used to recreate the film’s New York City backdrop. This eased and expedited the matting process by eliminating the need for more complex blue screen matting techniques. As a result, the sequences captured using the Elicon Camera Control System were completed nearly a month ahead of schedule.
       A 15 Oct 1980 Var article reported that principle photography wrapped on 9 Oct 1980, after an all-night shoot at the base of the Statue of Liberty. In a 24 Oct 1980 HR article, Carpenter claimed the shoot was the first in history allowed at nighttime at the site of the famed statue. The locale served as the exterior for the United States Police Force’s control room.
       A 16 Apr 1981 DV article reported that the film previewed to an enthusiastic audience as an unannounced feature at Filmex, the former-annual Los Angeles film festival. The article also revealed the film had been set to screen at the USA Film Festival in Dallas, but was pulled from the schedule because they did not have the equipment to screen the film’s “double system [work] print.”
       A 14 Jul 1981 HR news item announced that the film opened to just over $4.1 million in box-office grosses on 579 screens, screening best in New York City, where it pulled in $922,367 from 96 theaters. A 28 Jul 1981 HR article reported that Escape From New York had earned nearly $11.8 million in US box office receipts, from 476 theaters and drive-ins. According to a 21 Jul 1981 HR news item, an Avco Embassy Vice-President identified the film’s 10-day opening of just over $9 million as the biggest in the company’s history.
       The film received generally favorable reviews. In a 12 Jun 1981 HR review, Arthur Knight stated, “it’s the film’s incessant action, along with its imagination, that will spell out the success of Escape From New York .” A positive 17 Jun 1981 Var review also predicted good business for the film, even against higher-budget competition like Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981, see entry) and Superman II (1981, see entry), identifying the film’s moral depth, Carpenter’s “visually smooth style,” and Russell’s leading man performance as major contributors to the film’s overall success. Var also praised Dean Cundey’s “darkly ominous lensing,” the economical, yet convincing special effects, Todd Ramsay’s editing, and Carpenter and Howarth’s original score.
       A 13 Mar 2007 DV news item announced that talent agency CAA was shopping a remake of the film, with Gerard Butler set to star, Neal Moritz to produce, and Ken Nolan to write. A 15 Aug 2007 HR news item later reported that Len Wiseman was in talks to direct the remake, with Carpenter acting as Executive Producer. The article also revealed that the remake would weave an origin story for Snake into the original premise. A 23 Apr 2010 DV article announced that Breck Eisner was in talks to direct the long-developing remake from New Line for Moritz’s Original Films. Gerard Butler had since left the project “over creative differences.” A 21 Jul 2011 Empire article reported that New Line and Warner Bros. had opted out of the project. The article also indicated that, in addition to Wiseman and Eisner, Brett Ratner and Jonathan Mostow were considered as directorial options and Jeremy Renner, Josh Brolin, and, most recenty, Tom Hardy, had been courted as possible leads to replace Butler.
       A 30 Jul 2003 HR article announced the creation of a multi-media Snake Plissken franchise called “The Snake Plissken Chronicles,” resulting from a series of deals set up by Russell, Carpenter, and Hill, who, under the company Snake World, “jointly owned the character rights.” Namco Hometek Inc. bought the rights to create “The Snake Plissken Chronicles” video games, using Russell’s likeness and voice, with the first game scheduled for a Christmas 2005 release. Production IG secured the rights to make an anime movie titled Chronicles of Snake , also to feature Russell’s voice. Additionally, after publishing two issues of a comic book entitled “John Carpenter’s Snake Plissken Chronicles,” HR noted that Hurricane Comics extended their existing deal with Snake World, buying the rights for a three-year comic book series of bimonthly episodes. The extension deal also added Russell, Carpenter, and Hill as executive producers of the comic series.
       A 1996 sequel, Escape From L.A. (see entry), directed by Carpenter, produced by Hill, and starring Russell, received poor reviews. A 2 Nov 1995 DV news item reported that Russell had been paid $10 million to “reprise his role.” Actor Cliff Robertson played the role of the U.S. President.



The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Michael Thielvoldt, an independent scholar.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Apr 1981.
---
Daily Variety
2 Nov 1995.
---
Daily Variety
13 Mar 2007.
---
Daily Variety
23 Apr 2010.
---
Empire
21 Jul 2011.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Oct 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 1981
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jul 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jul 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 2003.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 2007.
---
Los Angeles Times
10 Jul 1981
p. 1.
Millimeter
Jun 1981.
---
New York Times
10 Jul 1981
p. 6.
Variety
15 Oct 1980.
---
Variety
17 Jun 1981
p. 14.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring
Special Appearance by
Special Appearance by
Special Appearance by
as
+

PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Debra Hill Production
A City Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit dir of photog
2d unit cam op
2d unit cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d unit asst cam
2d unit asst cam
Gaffer
Rigging gaffer
Best boy elec
Flicker box tech
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Stills
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Graphic des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice ed
Asst to asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead man
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const foreman
Propmaker foreman
Propmaker foreman
Propmaker
Paint supv
Paint foreman
Stand-by painter
Painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men's cost
Women's cost
MUSIC
In assoc with, Mus
Orig mus performed by
Orig mus performed by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
Spec synthesizer sd
Asst sd ed
Stereo rec
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec visual eff by
Producer-liaison, New World/Venice
Project supv, New World/Venice
Dir of photog, New World/Venice
Dir of photog, New World/Venice
Dir of photog, New World/Venice
Dir of photog, New World/Venice
Elicon cam op, New World/Venice
Elicon cam op, New World/Venice
Elicon cam op, New World/Venice
Miniature const, New World/Venice
Eng, New World/Venice
Matte artwork, New World/Venice
Matte artwork, New World/Venice
Matte artwork, New World/Venice
Rotoscope, New World/Venice
Rotoscope, New World/Venice
Lab liaison, New World/Venice
Gaffer, New World/Venice
Cam asst, New World/Venice
Cam asst, New World/Venice
Assoc prod, New World/Venice
Prod mgr, New World/Venice
Prod accountant, New World/Venice
Prod secy, New World/Venice
Graphic displays by
Titles/Opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist supv
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting/Asst to the prods
Extra casting, St. Louis
Extra casting, Los Angeles
Prod office coord
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Unit pub
Weapons adv
Craft service
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Prod asst
Office prod asst
Accountant
Avco nominee
Creative mobile tech
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Meals
Asst to the assts
Loc contact
Loc contact
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Bandstand Boogie," music by Charles Albertine, courtesy Cherio Corporation
"Engulfed Cathedral," by Claude Debussy.
SONGS
"Everyone's Going to New York," music and lyrics by Nick Castle.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
John Carpenter's Escape from New York
Release Date:
10 July 1981
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 10 July 1981
Production Date:
4 August--November 1980
Copyright Claimant:
Avco Embassy Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
12 August 1981
Copyright Number:
PA110942
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo
Color
Metrocolor®
Lenses/Prints
Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
99
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26272
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1988 the crime rate in the United States rose four hundred percent. As a result, Manhattan has been converted into the country’s only maximum-security penitentiary. The nation’s entire prisoner population now lives inside the 50-foot containment wall surrounding the island, with no guards inside, and only one rule: “once you go in, you don’t come out.” In the present year, 1997, a control tower operator tries unsuccessfully to respond to a mayday sent from an aircraft using the call sign “David 14,” code for Air Force One. Government officials soon discover that Air Force One has been hijacked by a Marxist revolutionary. Aides equip the President of the United States with a tracking device, and he settles into an escape pod, ejecting from Air Force One as the plane crashes onto the island of Manhattan. Police quickly infiltrate the prison to save the President, but a prisoner presents a severed finger as evidence that the President has been taken captive and threatens to execute him if the police do not leave. With limited options, Police Commissioner Bob Hauk turns to recently processed prisoner and former war hero, Snake Plissken, for help. Snake, who was arrested for robbing a Federal Reserve depository, shows contempt for Hauk as he proposes Snake’s mission: in the next twenty-four hours, if Snake can recover the President alive, along with the time-sensitive information he is carrying, he will receive a full pardon. Snake accepts. To ensure Snake’s compliance, two pin-sized explosives are embedded in his neck. Equipped with a tracer that sends a tracking signal, a homing device tuned to the President’s signal, and a small arsenal, Snake flies a jet glider into the ... +


In 1988 the crime rate in the United States rose four hundred percent. As a result, Manhattan has been converted into the country’s only maximum-security penitentiary. The nation’s entire prisoner population now lives inside the 50-foot containment wall surrounding the island, with no guards inside, and only one rule: “once you go in, you don’t come out.” In the present year, 1997, a control tower operator tries unsuccessfully to respond to a mayday sent from an aircraft using the call sign “David 14,” code for Air Force One. Government officials soon discover that Air Force One has been hijacked by a Marxist revolutionary. Aides equip the President of the United States with a tracking device, and he settles into an escape pod, ejecting from Air Force One as the plane crashes onto the island of Manhattan. Police quickly infiltrate the prison to save the President, but a prisoner presents a severed finger as evidence that the President has been taken captive and threatens to execute him if the police do not leave. With limited options, Police Commissioner Bob Hauk turns to recently processed prisoner and former war hero, Snake Plissken, for help. Snake, who was arrested for robbing a Federal Reserve depository, shows contempt for Hauk as he proposes Snake’s mission: in the next twenty-four hours, if Snake can recover the President alive, along with the time-sensitive information he is carrying, he will receive a full pardon. Snake accepts. To ensure Snake’s compliance, two pin-sized explosives are embedded in his neck. Equipped with a tracer that sends a tracking signal, a homing device tuned to the President’s signal, and a small arsenal, Snake flies a jet glider into the city. He lands the glider, atop a World Trade Center tower and descends, via elevator, into the city below. Snake picks up the President’s signal at the Air Force One crash site and follows it to the basement of the Fox Theatre, where he discovers an old drunkard wearing the President’s tracking device. Assuming the President dead, Snake requests an exit from Hauk, but the Commissioner demands that Snake continue. Back on the hunt, Snake encounters a roving band of subway-dwelling cannibals, known as “Crazies,” who have surfaced in search of “food.” Running for his life, Snake accidentally breaks the walkie-talkie he has been using to communicate with Hauk but manages to escape with the help of a cabbie who first recognized him at the Fox Theatre. Driving Snake to safety, the cabbie informs him that “The Duke,” the ruthless ruler of New York, has the President. He takes Snake to The Duke’s friend, Brain, in the hopes that he can lead Snake to The Duke. As it turns out, “Brain” is Harold Helman, a former friend of Snake’s who ran out on him when last they worked together. After some threatening negotiations, Brain agrees to help. Snake, Brain, and Brain’s girlfriend, Maggie, spot The Duke’s caravan on the street outside Brain’s lair, but, at Brain’s behest, they do not engage The Duke just yet. Instead, Snake stealthily carjacks one of The Duke’s vehicles, after the cabbie ditches them, and the three rush ahead of the caravan to free the President before The Duke returns home. Snake successfully infiltrates a train car where the President has been tied up. A guard shoots Snake in the leg with an arrow, but Snake kills him and unbinds the President. As Snake and the President attempt to escape, The Duke’s forces overtake them. With the President back in shackles, The Duke sends Hauk a message demanding amnesty for all prisoners in exchange for the President, along with the President’s briefcase, which lacks the important cassette tape Hauk is interested in recovering. Believing Snake is incapacitated, Hauk readies a last resort team to raid the city. Meanwhile, The Duke forces Snake to battle a large man to the death before a large audience. Brain and Maggie use the distraction to free the President from The Duke’s guards. Having located the jet glider, they intend to steal it and turn over the President to Hauk themselves in exchange for pardons. In the ring, Snake kills his competitor and wins over the crowd. As the masses cheer his name, Snake activates his tracking bracelet, which is now being worn by one of The Duke’s men. After a prisoner announces loudly that Brain has taken the President, the room clears and Snake makes a getaway. He catches up with Brain, Maggie, and the President atop the World Trade Center, where a band of prisoners assault them and push the glider over the building’s edge. Snake and the others retreat into the building, working their way down to the lobby where Brain’s car awaits. Snake wants to leave Brain and Maggie behind, punishment for having double-crossed him, but only Brain knows the whereabouts of the President’s cassette tape. When the car will not start, Snake checks under the hood. Instead of an engine, he finds a man with a crossbow. The Duke and his gang emerge from the shadows. Snake fires a well-aimed shot at a steam valve, which provides cover enough for the group to escape. Outside the building, the cabbie pulls up and they pile into his ride. Snake takes the wheel and they tear off for the 69th Street Bridge, their route out of the prison. Along the way, they discover that the cabbie has the President’s cassette tape, having earlier traded his hat for it. Once on the bridge, Brain navigates a path around numerous land mines, but a wrong turn totals the car and kills the cabbie. The remaining three continue on foot. Soon after, Brain hits a land mine and explodes. With Brain dead, Maggie decides to sacrifice herself. Snake gives Maggie his gun, and she faces off against The Duke. She opens fire on his Cadillac, and it crashes into her. The collision kills Maggie and forces The Duke to continue on foot. When the President reaches the containment wall, Snake helps him into a harness and police pull him over the wall. The Duke arrives with his machine gun, but Snake disarms and pummels him. When the harness is lowered again, Snake straps in. Snake ascends midway up the containment wall, but the President halts the pulley, purposely setting Snake up as an open target for The Duke. Re-armed, The Duke takes aim on Snake, but the President, wielding a machine gun, riddles The Duke with bullets. The President then turns the pulley back on, and Snake escapes the prison. With the President and the cassette tape safely returned, Hauk disarms the explosives in Snake’s neck minutes before their detonation time, and the President readies to address an international summit meeting on the cassette’s content. Snake asks the President what he thinks about the many people who died trying to save him, minutes before he goes on air. Distracted, the President responds with a lackadaisical, “I want to thank them. This nation appreciates their sacrifice.” Snake scowls at the response and walks away. Snake passes Hauk, who offers him another job. Snake ignores the offer and continues walking. The President begins his address; however, when the President plays the cassette tape for the summit, he discovers that the tape containing important information about fusion technology has been replaced by a tape containing big band music. In the distance, Snake pulls a cassette from his pocket and unspools the tape, destroying it.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.