Andy Warhol's Dracula (1974)

X | 106 mins | Horror | 1974

Director:

Paul Morrissey

Writer:

Paul Morrissey

Producer:

Andrew Braunsberg

Cinematographer:

Luigi Kuveiller

Production Designer:

Enrico Job
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HISTORY

The working title for the film was Blood for Dracula .
       According to a 2 Jan 1996 Village Voice article, director Paul Morrissey first joined Andy Warhol’s Factory in 1965, and served not only as a filmmaker, but as Warhol’s manager, for almost ten years. Morrissey directed both Andy Warhol’s Dracula and Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein (1974, see entry) in 1973, one after the other. The films were shot at Cinecittà studio in Rome, Italy, with financing provided by Carlo Ponti, as noted in a Jul 1974 edition of Coast . A 14 Jul 1974 NYT article stated that Ponti provided $700,000 for the “two-picture package.”
       In a 3 May 1974 HR article, Morrissey stated that he used a crew of sixty people on the film. According to a 27 Feb 1974 Var article, Morrissey allowed “Dracula” to move about during the daytime, instead of having to stay in his coffin during sunlight hours, as vampire lore typically mandated, due to production constraints; Morrissey’s film was not scheduled to allow extra time for night shooting, specifically for the scenes covering Dracula’s travel to Italy.
       A 25 Jul 1974 LAT news item reported that the film had been picked as an “official entry” in the Atlanta Film Festival, with a screening set for 16 Aug 1974. The Jul 1974 Coast stated that the film had not been picked up by a distributor to that time. An 11 Apr 1974 DV news item erroneously identified the film as Scars for Dracula when pointing out that Bryanston Pictures, distributor ... More Less

The working title for the film was Blood for Dracula .
       According to a 2 Jan 1996 Village Voice article, director Paul Morrissey first joined Andy Warhol’s Factory in 1965, and served not only as a filmmaker, but as Warhol’s manager, for almost ten years. Morrissey directed both Andy Warhol’s Dracula and Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein (1974, see entry) in 1973, one after the other. The films were shot at Cinecittà studio in Rome, Italy, with financing provided by Carlo Ponti, as noted in a Jul 1974 edition of Coast . A 14 Jul 1974 NYT article stated that Ponti provided $700,000 for the “two-picture package.”
       In a 3 May 1974 HR article, Morrissey stated that he used a crew of sixty people on the film. According to a 27 Feb 1974 Var article, Morrissey allowed “Dracula” to move about during the daytime, instead of having to stay in his coffin during sunlight hours, as vampire lore typically mandated, due to production constraints; Morrissey’s film was not scheduled to allow extra time for night shooting, specifically for the scenes covering Dracula’s travel to Italy.
       A 25 Jul 1974 LAT news item reported that the film had been picked as an “official entry” in the Atlanta Film Festival, with a screening set for 16 Aug 1974. The Jul 1974 Coast stated that the film had not been picked up by a distributor to that time. An 11 Apr 1974 DV news item erroneously identified the film as Scars for Dracula when pointing out that Bryanston Pictures, distributor for Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein , did not pick up distribution rights to Andy Warhol’s Dracula .
       The film opened to mixed reviews. Critics pointed to two vomit scenes as the most climactic and entertaining of the film. The 5 Nov 1974 HR review lauded Enrico Job’s production design and Luigi Kuveiller’s photography. While Kevin Thomas, in a 6 Nov 1974 LAT review, also acknowledged the film as aesthetically pleasing, he lamented that Morrissey had too much talent for “such sickening junk.” After the film was released with an X-rating, an 18 Aug 1975 Box report announced that the MPAA had re-rated the film to an R.
       A 10 Mar 1982 Var news item announced that Silverstein International Corp. would be selling both Andy Warhol’s Dracula and Andy Warhol’s Frankenstein to foreign distributors, screening the film to interest buyers at the 1982 American Film Market in Los Angeles, CA.
       According to a 23 Jun 1993 HR article, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, NY, was restoring Andy Warhol’s feature-length and short films, including Andy Warhol’s Dracula . Following the restoration, domestic and foreign “theatrical, TV and home video outlets” would be offered the chance to license the films individually or, in some cases, as packages. HR noted that several stars of Warhol films, including Joe Dallesandro, were expected to promote the restored versions. Proceeds from the sales were set to go to the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, specifically towards artists’ grants.
       Director Roman Polanski played an uncredited cameo in the film as an Italian villager.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
25 Nov 1974
p. 4738.
Box Office
18 Aug 1975.
---
Coast
Jul 1974
p. 65.
Daily Variety
11 Apr 1974
p. 1, 4.
Hollywood Reporter
3 May 1974.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Nov 1974
pp. 3-4.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 1993.
---
LAHExam
6 Nov 1974.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Nov 1974.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 Jul 1974.
---
New York Times
20 Feb 1974
p. 16.
New York Times
14 Jul 1974
Section II, p.1.
New York Times
8 Feb 1975.
---
Newsweek
24 Feb 1975
p. 84.
Variety
20 Feb 1974
p. 16.
Variety
27 Feb 1974.
---
Variety
10 Mar 1982.
---
Village Voice
2 Jan 1996.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Still cam
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
COSTUMES
Ward supv
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Continuity
1st prod asst
Accountant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Inspired by the novel Dracula by Bram Stoker (London, 1897).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Blood for Dracula
Release Date:
1974
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 6 November 1974
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
106
MPAA Rating:
X
Countries:
Italy, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Count Dracula’s assistant, Anton, informs Dracula that he must leave Romania as soon as possible. Anton suggests they go to Italy, where the Count’s title will impress people and the odds of finding a virgin are higher, as Dracula must drink a virgin’s blood to survive. The men help Dracula’s vampire sister into a coffin, then set off for Italy in a car with Dracula’s coffin strapped to the top. In Italy, young women of the Di Fiori family tend to the land on their estate. One of them takes her top off due to the heat, and another follows. Their mother yells at them from the patio to cover up. Mario, the gardener, appears and asks two of the girls if he’ll see them later. Dracula and Anton arrive at a stranger’s house in Italy and request to stay. Anton explains to the owners of the house that Dracula’s first wife died, and now he is looking to get married to a virgin. The man of the house suggests Dracula meet the daughters of the Di Fiori family, but the woman interjects, calling the oldest daughter “a tramp.” Dracula dislikes Italy and wants to leave, but Anton encourages him to first meet the Di Fiori sisters. Dracula’s body convulses uncontrollably and he requests to be let out for the night. Anton refuses him. At the Di Fiori home, the Marchesa tells her husband that she wants one of their daughters to marry Count Dracula. Anton later visits and asks the Marchese to confirm that his daughters are virgins. He also warns that Dracula’s car has a coffin on top, which holds the Count’s dead uncle, whom they are ... +


Count Dracula’s assistant, Anton, informs Dracula that he must leave Romania as soon as possible. Anton suggests they go to Italy, where the Count’s title will impress people and the odds of finding a virgin are higher, as Dracula must drink a virgin’s blood to survive. The men help Dracula’s vampire sister into a coffin, then set off for Italy in a car with Dracula’s coffin strapped to the top. In Italy, young women of the Di Fiori family tend to the land on their estate. One of them takes her top off due to the heat, and another follows. Their mother yells at them from the patio to cover up. Mario, the gardener, appears and asks two of the girls if he’ll see them later. Dracula and Anton arrive at a stranger’s house in Italy and request to stay. Anton explains to the owners of the house that Dracula’s first wife died, and now he is looking to get married to a virgin. The man of the house suggests Dracula meet the daughters of the Di Fiori family, but the woman interjects, calling the oldest daughter “a tramp.” Dracula dislikes Italy and wants to leave, but Anton encourages him to first meet the Di Fiori sisters. Dracula’s body convulses uncontrollably and he requests to be let out for the night. Anton refuses him. At the Di Fiori home, the Marchesa tells her husband that she wants one of their daughters to marry Count Dracula. Anton later visits and asks the Marchese to confirm that his daughters are virgins. He also warns that Dracula’s car has a coffin on top, which holds the Count’s dead uncle, whom they are transporting back to Romania to be buried. That night, Anton visits a tavern and engages in a drinking contest with a local. The man attacks Anton, but their fight is interrupted when a woman announces that an accident has taken place outside. Anton returns to the house where he and Dracula are staying with a basket of bread soaked in blood and explains that he took the blood from the site of a car accident where a young girl was hit. Dracula sucks the blood from the bread and finds it nourishing, thereby confirming that the girl was a virgin. Later, Mario meets two of the Di Fiori girls, Rubinia and Saphiria, and has sex with Rubinia while Saphiria watches. When the girls tell Mario about Dracula, he becomes resentful and tells them he’s tired of them. He then expresses his desire to rape their fourteen-year-old sister, Perla. The next day, Dracula arrives for a stay at the Di Fiori home. After meeting the girls, Dracula goes to his room, claiming he does not feel well. Anton orders Mario to get the coffin, but Mario insists Anton help him and that it must go in the home’s private chapel, not Dracula’s room. Soon after, Saphiria visits Mario in his shed and complains that Dracula is ugly. Mario predicts that Dracula will lose his money after “the revolution,” so there is no point to marrying him. He angrily forces himself on Saphiria, but when she tells Mario that she loves him, he sends her away. That night, Dracula convulses and tells Anton that he needs to see the girls. Saphiria arrives and delivers Dracula’s dinner. He asks her to sit on the bed and questions her about her virginity. After Saphiria insists she has had no sexual experience, Dracula bites into her neck and drinks her blood. He then becomes sick and vomits in the bathroom. Meanwhile, Mario and Rubinia have sex in her room. Mario complains that someone like him could never marry one of the Di Fiori sisters. In the morning, Saphiria wears a scarf around her neck to cover the bite marks and tells the Marchesa that Dracula does not want her. Dracula later questions Mario about the Di Fiori sisters and asks if they have any suitors. Mario denies it, then argues with him about socialism. Their argument is interrupted when Dracula convulses in hunger. That evening, Rubinia bathes and tells her younger sister that she’s going to see the Count. In his quarters, Dracula tells Rubinia that Saphiria did not work out for him because she was not a virgin. He then bites into Rubinia’s neck and, yet again, becomes sick after drinking her blood. The following day, the Marchese leaves for London but promises to be back in three days. Anton visits the Marchesa to tell her that Dracula must leave because neither Rubinia nor Saphiria are virgins. However, when Anton finds out the youngest girl, Perla, is only fourteen years old, he becomes excited. Outside, Perla finds Mario chopping wood to tell him that Dracula will be leaving the next morning. Mario airs his suspicions about the Count, telling Perla that he wanted a coffin in his room and does not seem to want to get married. Mario flirts with Perla, but she walks away. That night, Dracula finds another of the sisters, Esmerelda, sitting alone in a room. She tells him that their father gambled all the family money away, and now the house is falling apart. Esmerelda remarks that she was once engaged for seventeen months. Dracula then leaves, deciding she must not be a virgin. Mario sneaks into the chapel to pry open Dracula’s coffin and finds there is no body inside. Rubinia and Saphiria arrive at Perla’s room and show her their bite marks. They confirm that Perla is a virgin before escorting her to Dracula’s room. On the way there, Perla breaks free and runs away. Elsewhere in the house, Mario runs into Perla and tells her that Dracula is a vampire and needs the blood of a virgin to stay alive. Mario informs her that because she is a virgin, she would become a vampire, too, if she were bitten. He then suggests he take Perla’s virginity so that Dracula does not want her. Mario forces himself on Perla and they have sex, until the Marchesa walks in and stops him. The Count enters the room after the others have gone and licks Perla’s blood off the floor. Soon after, Dracula overhears Mario say that Esmerelda is the only virgin left, and that he plans to attack Dracula with an axe. The Marchesa shoots Anton while Mario chases Dracula through the house. Outside, Mario wields an axe and corners Dracula, but Esmerelda appears to stop the attack, her neck now covered in a scarf. Despite Esmerelda’s resistance, Mario kills Dracula by piercing his heart with the axe’s wooden handle. Esmerelda screams and falls on top of the wooden handle, killing herself. Perla appears, but Mario leads her back inside the house.
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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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