Ginger in the Morning (1974)

PG | 75 mins | Drama, Romance | 5 March 1974

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HISTORY

       A 1 Mar 1972 HR news item, which incorrectly identified director Gordon Wiles as “Gordon Wilde,” announced that filming for Ginger in the Morning would take place in Albuquerque, NM, starting 6 Mar 1972. The film would be shot with a video camera, and the footage subsequently transferred to film. According to a 16 Mar 1972 HR report, Louis Hexter, an investor from Dallas who made his first foray into filmmaking by financing Ginger in the Morning , was set to receive the first-ever onscreen “financier” credit for the film. Mark Miller, who wrote, executive produced and acted in the film, defended the financier’s right to take a credit, likening Hexter’s function on the film to that of a studio’s.
       A 6 Jul 1973 HR news item stated that film would premiere 5 Mar 1974 in Albuquerque, NM; Atlanta, GA; Augusta, GA; Dallas, TX; Denver, CO; Jacksonville, FL; and Salt Lake City, UT. Mark Miller was scheduled to appear at the Albuquerque, NM, opening as well as the Dallas, TX, opening where he would be joined by actress Sissy Spacek, incorrectly identified in the news item as “Cissy Spacek.”
       A 14 Apr 1981 Var news item reported that, after Sissy Spacek won an Oscar for her performance in Coal Miner’s Daughter (1980, see entry), the home video version of Ginger in the Morning surged in popularity, and several foreign markets, including England, Finland, Germany, Italy, Spain, Russia, and Albania, expressed interest in theatrical rights.

      End credits contain a written statement in which the producers thank the following organizations and individuals: New Mexico Film ... More Less

       A 1 Mar 1972 HR news item, which incorrectly identified director Gordon Wiles as “Gordon Wilde,” announced that filming for Ginger in the Morning would take place in Albuquerque, NM, starting 6 Mar 1972. The film would be shot with a video camera, and the footage subsequently transferred to film. According to a 16 Mar 1972 HR report, Louis Hexter, an investor from Dallas who made his first foray into filmmaking by financing Ginger in the Morning , was set to receive the first-ever onscreen “financier” credit for the film. Mark Miller, who wrote, executive produced and acted in the film, defended the financier’s right to take a credit, likening Hexter’s function on the film to that of a studio’s.
       A 6 Jul 1973 HR news item stated that film would premiere 5 Mar 1974 in Albuquerque, NM; Atlanta, GA; Augusta, GA; Dallas, TX; Denver, CO; Jacksonville, FL; and Salt Lake City, UT. Mark Miller was scheduled to appear at the Albuquerque, NM, opening as well as the Dallas, TX, opening where he would be joined by actress Sissy Spacek, incorrectly identified in the news item as “Cissy Spacek.”
       A 14 Apr 1981 Var news item reported that, after Sissy Spacek won an Oscar for her performance in Coal Miner’s Daughter (1980, see entry), the home video version of Ginger in the Morning surged in popularity, and several foreign markets, including England, Finland, Germany, Italy, Spain, Russia, and Albania, expressed interest in theatrical rights.

      End credits contain a written statement in which the producers thank the following organizations and individuals: New Mexico Film Commission, Larry Hamm - Charles Cullin; Betty Egan's Rancho Encantado; La Fonda Hotel; Town House Motel; Suzette International Ltd.; and Chaparral Casting.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
17 Mar 1972.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 1972.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Mar 1972.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 1972.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 1972
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 1972
p. 21.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Apr 1972.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 1973.
---
Variety
14 Apr 1981.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
COSTUMES
Miss Oliver's ward
Fashion consultant
Neiman-Marcus
MUSIC
Mus comp & arr
Orig songs
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd boom
Sd eff
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles, opticals & processing by
MAKEUP
Miss Oliver's hair styles des by
of London West, Beverly Hills
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Prod secy
Prod accountant
Driver
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 March 1974
Production Date:
late March--early April 1972
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
75
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

A truck driver drops off a hitchhiker, Ginger Brown, at the side of the road. Ginger notices a plane flying above her and calls out, “Hello bird!” Disembarking the plane at the airport, Joe Maroney, dressed in a suit and carrying a briefcase, tells a fellow traveler that he’s been divorced for three months. The man warns Joe that he must date other women in order to get over his divorce, and suggests that he pick up a woman and take her to a motel as soon as possible. Joe then flirts with a stewardess, but her husband interrupts them. Later, Joe spots Ginger hitchhiking as he drives home. Joe passes her, then turns around to pick her up but blows a tire in the process. Ginger happens upon Joe as he replaces the tire and offers to help. She informs him that she’s headed to Colorado Springs, where her father works as a sergeant in the Air Corps. Joe tells Ginger that he’s headed to Denver and she can ride with him. Later, Ginger plays guitar and sings for Joe as he drives. When they stop at a motel, there is only one room available, so he decides to keep looking. They go for a late dinner at a restaurant in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Ginger changes into a dress in the bathroom. At the table, Joe tells Ginger she can order anything she wants. She asks if he’s married, and when he tells her “no,” she instructs him to remove his wedding ring. Later, Ginger removes the whipped cream from her dessert, explaining that she doesn’t eat foods with synthetic ingredients. Ginger then shows Joe ... +


A truck driver drops off a hitchhiker, Ginger Brown, at the side of the road. Ginger notices a plane flying above her and calls out, “Hello bird!” Disembarking the plane at the airport, Joe Maroney, dressed in a suit and carrying a briefcase, tells a fellow traveler that he’s been divorced for three months. The man warns Joe that he must date other women in order to get over his divorce, and suggests that he pick up a woman and take her to a motel as soon as possible. Joe then flirts with a stewardess, but her husband interrupts them. Later, Joe spots Ginger hitchhiking as he drives home. Joe passes her, then turns around to pick her up but blows a tire in the process. Ginger happens upon Joe as he replaces the tire and offers to help. She informs him that she’s headed to Colorado Springs, where her father works as a sergeant in the Air Corps. Joe tells Ginger that he’s headed to Denver and she can ride with him. Later, Ginger plays guitar and sings for Joe as he drives. When they stop at a motel, there is only one room available, so he decides to keep looking. They go for a late dinner at a restaurant in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Ginger changes into a dress in the bathroom. At the table, Joe tells Ginger she can order anything she wants. She asks if he’s married, and when he tells her “no,” she instructs him to remove his wedding ring. Later, Ginger removes the whipped cream from her dessert, explaining that she doesn’t eat foods with synthetic ingredients. Ginger then shows Joe a picture of her ex-boyfriend, Clayton, and he responds in kind, sharing a picture of his ex-wife, Marcy. Later, by a fire, Ginger explains that her relationship ended because Clayton was “too much of a crusader,” and she is a pacifist. After dinner, Joe remembers that his friend, who lives in Santa Fe and is currently out of town, offered to let Joe stay at his house. There, Ginger finds several paintings signed by Joe. She then realizes the house is actually his. Joe tells Ginger about his friend Charlie who served in the Korean War with him. He mentions that he’d like Ginger to meet Charlie some day and then kisses her. Elsewhere, Charlie tries to kiss a stewardess outside a plane and tells her he’s on his way to see Joe. Ginger takes a bath at Joe’s house, and he talks to her from another room, explaining that he moved to Santa Fe from New York three months ago. Out of the bath, Ginger suggests to Joe that they burn the photographs of their exes. She then tells Joe that she “digs” him and would like to spend a few nights with him but promises to “split” afterwards. Joe reluctantly agrees, and Ginger takes some money, heading out to buy groceries for breakfast. While she’s away, Charlie arrives at Joe’s house, and Salvador, his Spanish-speaking driver, brings Charlie’s bags in. Joe urges the men to leave, but his friend refuses. Joe explains that Ginger, a “hippie-hitchhiker,” is staying with him. Meanwhile, she returns to the house and overhears Joe explaining that he picked her up because he is “desperate,” and she’s “a sure thing.” Offended, Ginger insists that Charlie stay and asks Salvador to take her to the nearest bus stop. While Ginger packs her things, Charlie pays Salvador to leave then consoles the girl. Ginger proceeds to cry, telling Joe that he ruined “the most beautiful day of her whole life.” Joe asks her to stay, and she agrees only if Charlie promises to stay as well. The next day, on New Year’s Eve, Charlie’s ex-wife, Sugar, calls and complains to Joe that her ex-husband hasn’t been paying child support. Joe leaves to meet her at the airport, then drives her back to the house. In the meantime, Ginger tells Charlie that she’s pregnant. When Joe returns with Sugar, Charlie sarcastically welcomes her. Later, they all go to a Mexican restaurant for a New Year’s Eve celebration. Charlie tells Joe his plans to sell his “mud business” and buy a ranch in Sonora, Mexico, encouraging his friend to invest in the ranch with him. However, when Sugar overhears, she tells Charlie she won’t let him sell the mud company, which she co-owns. They fight, and the group is thrown out of the restaurant. Back at Joe’s house, Charlie argues with Sugar about the child support he refuses to pay. She accuses him of cheating on her during their ten-year marriage, and he counters by calling her “frigid.” During the heated argument, Charlie accidentally mentions Ginger’s pregnancy. The girl informs Joe that the baby belongs to Clayton, who didn’t want to be a father. Joe insults her when he suggests she should have been on birth control. The women then leave together. Joe and Charlie head back to town, and wander the streets, drinking. Charlie boasts that he once hit Sugar in the jaw, and that she retaliated by hitting him with a golf club and almost fracturing his skull. The men share a laugh, but a police captain interrupts. After Joe and Charlie inform the officer that they are war heroes, exaggerating their exploits in Korea, the captain escorts them home. Hung over the next morning, the men eat breakfast at a diner. Charlie tells a story about his late father and worries that he has let him down. To cheer him up, Joe takes his friend for a drive in the mountains. Elsewhere, Ginger and Sugar share a meal at a restaurant. Ginger encourages Sugar to take Charlie back. In the mountains, Joe laments losing Ginger, and wonders why he can’t get her out of his thoughts. The men, who are still a bit drunk, spot a group of children and challenge them to a snowball fight. The police captain happens upon them and, once again, escorts them home. There, Sugar and Ginger await. Sugar apologizes to Charlie and asks him to take her back. In another room, Ginger asks Joe to love her. Joe argues that he’s not a hippie and doesn’t agree with “free love.” He adds that he may be unable to handle Ginger having another man’s child. Charlie interrupts to inform them that he’s taken Sugar back. Ginger hitches a ride with Charlie and Sugar, leaving Joe alone. Later, Charlie calls Joe to tell him that they left Ginger at the bus station. Joe rushes to the station, but, when he arrives, the bus to Colorado has already left. Joe sees the police captain and begs him to stop Ginger’s bus. The captain agrees to help. Soon after, they track down the bus and the police captain pulls it over. Joe climbs aboard and asks Ginger to come with him, but she refuses. The captain lends Joe money so that he can buy a ticket to ride on the bus. As they head to Colorado, Joe urges Ginger to return with him. He tells her he loves her, and that he wants to help raise her child. Distracted by Joe, the bus driver swerves off to the side of the road. Joe disembarks there and doesn’t get back on. As the bus pulls away, he sees Ginger standing across the road. Together, they hitchhike for a ride back to Santa Fe. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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