Valley Girl (1983)

R | 92 mins | Comedy, Romance | 1983

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HISTORY


       The film marked director Martha Coolidge's first commercial feature production, and was made for less than $1 million, according to a 5 May 1983 LAT article.
       According to a 17 Jan 1983 DV news item, Pumpko Industries, musician Frank Zappa's company, filed a $100,000 suit against the production to prevent its release, claiming "false designation of origin, unfair competition, and dilution of trademark." Zappa’s daughter, Moon Unit Zappa, recorded the hit song “Valley Girl” on Frank Zappa’s 1982 album Ship Arriving Too Late to Save a Drowning Witch . A 12 May 1983 LAT article entitled “’Valley Girl’ – Era or Fad – Lives on in Merchandising,” discusses the fad set off by Zappa’s song. In the year following its release, “Valley Girl” inspired books, buttons, a clothing store, and, arguably, Coolidge’s film. However, according to LAT , a judge ruled against Frank Zappa’s lawsuit in March 1983, asserting “there would be no confusion in the public’s mind between the song and the film."
       The film grossed $1 million in its first weekend, according to LAT . Critics generally found the film likeable. Var praised Martha Coolidge’s thoughtful direction, saying the film showed “the clear imprint of its female director…the end result is far superior to the usual teen sexploitation picture cranked out by a lot of leering males.”
       According to an 18 Jul 1984 Var article, Coolidge, actress Lee Purcell, who performed the role of “Beth Brent,” actress Colleen Camp, who played “Sarah Richman,” and director of photography Frederick Elmes filed a joint suit against Atlantic Releasing Company for $5 million. The ... More Less


       The film marked director Martha Coolidge's first commercial feature production, and was made for less than $1 million, according to a 5 May 1983 LAT article.
       According to a 17 Jan 1983 DV news item, Pumpko Industries, musician Frank Zappa's company, filed a $100,000 suit against the production to prevent its release, claiming "false designation of origin, unfair competition, and dilution of trademark." Zappa’s daughter, Moon Unit Zappa, recorded the hit song “Valley Girl” on Frank Zappa’s 1982 album Ship Arriving Too Late to Save a Drowning Witch . A 12 May 1983 LAT article entitled “’Valley Girl’ – Era or Fad – Lives on in Merchandising,” discusses the fad set off by Zappa’s song. In the year following its release, “Valley Girl” inspired books, buttons, a clothing store, and, arguably, Coolidge’s film. However, according to LAT , a judge ruled against Frank Zappa’s lawsuit in March 1983, asserting “there would be no confusion in the public’s mind between the song and the film."
       The film grossed $1 million in its first weekend, according to LAT . Critics generally found the film likeable. Var praised Martha Coolidge’s thoughtful direction, saying the film showed “the clear imprint of its female director…the end result is far superior to the usual teen sexploitation picture cranked out by a lot of leering males.”
       According to an 18 Jul 1984 Var article, Coolidge, actress Lee Purcell, who performed the role of “Beth Brent,” actress Colleen Camp, who played “Sarah Richman,” and director of photography Frederick Elmes filed a joint suit against Atlantic Releasing Company for $5 million. The group claimed they were owed a portion of the film's profits based on previous contractual agreements.
       An 18 Jul 2008 DV article announced that MGM was developing a musical remake of the film.

       The end credits contain an acknowledgement for the following organizations and individuals: Tuxedos by Tuxedo Den, Granada Hills, CA; Chrysler Corp; Pico Rents; Fromageries Bel, Inc.; Kern Foods, Inc.; Hickory’s Best; The Dannon Company, Inc.; Party King of Tarzana; Natural Protein Products; The Linen Trees; Judy Baker; Spy’s International; Laurel Canyon Sportswear; Cort Furniture; Vie De France International; Frieda of California; Western Bagel; Calistoga Mineral Water Co.; Tecate Beer; Total Fitness Inc.; Judy Keppler; Sasson; Fleece Chemise; Judi Baker Wiesenhutter; Ball Gowns by Bonnie Strauss and Jessica McClintock.


The summary and note for this entry was completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Adam Tate, a student at the University of Texas at Austin, with Janet Staiger as academic advisor.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
17 Jan 1983.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jul 2008.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Mar 1983
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
29 Apr 1983
p. 1, 12.
Los Angeles Times
5 May 1983.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 May 1983.
---
New York Times
29 Apr 1983
p. 10.
Variety
13 Apr 1983
p. 18.
Variety
18 Jul 1984.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring
also starring
also starring
also starring
also starring
also starring
also starring
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PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr/1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit cam op
1st cam asst
2d cam asst
Gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Key grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Negative cutting by
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Asst set dec
Asst set dec
Prop master
COSTUMES
Ward consultant
Cost jewelry
Ball gowns by
Ball gowns by
MUSIC
Orig mus
Orig mus
Mus ed
Mus supv
Mus cleared by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Re-rec
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
Asst hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Extras casting
Extras casting
Casting asst
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Craft services
Prod coord
Prod coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to dir
STAND INS
Stunt coord
SOURCES
SONGS
Hollywood nightclub scenes featuring the Plimsouls performing: "Everywhere at Once," by Peter Case, ©1983 Baby Oh Yeah Music, BMI
"A Million Miles Away," by Case, Alkes, Fradkin, ©1982 Baby Oh Yeah Music/Nineties Music, BMI
[and] "Oldest Story in the World," by Peter Case, ©1983 Baby Oh Yeah Music, BMI. All the recordings of The Plimsouls, courtesy of The David Geffen Co. "He Could Be the One," by B. Paine & L. Paine, ©1982 Televox Music/House of Paine, BMI, Headstock Music/Painful Songs, ASCAP
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SONGS
Hollywood nightclub scenes featuring the Plimsouls performing: "Everywhere at Once," by Peter Case, ©1983 Baby Oh Yeah Music, BMI
"A Million Miles Away," by Case, Alkes, Fradkin, ©1982 Baby Oh Yeah Music/Nineties Music, BMI
[and] "Oldest Story in the World," by Peter Case, ©1983 Baby Oh Yeah Music, BMI. All the recordings of The Plimsouls, courtesy of The David Geffen Co. "He Could Be the One," by B. Paine & L. Paine, ©1982 Televox Music/House of Paine, BMI, Headstock Music/Painful Songs, ASCAP
"Johnny Are You Queer?," by B. Paine & L. Paine, ©1981 WB Music Corp./Paine-American Music, ASCAP, Warner Tamerlane Publ. Corp., BMI
"School Is In," by Gary Anderson and Gene Barge, ©1961 Rockmasters Inc., BMI
All recordings of Josie Cotton courtesy of Elektra/Asylum Records
"Girls Like Me," Bonnie Hayes with the Wild Combo, by Bonnie Hayes, Almo Music Corp./Puntoons, ASCAP, courtesy of Slash Records
"Shelley's Boyfriend," Bonnie Hayes with the Wild Combo, by B. Hayes and S. Savage, Almo Music Corp./Puntoons, ASCAP
"Eyes of a Stranger," Payolas, by P. Hyde and B. Rock, Irving Music of Canada, Ltd./Blotch Music PRO, administered by Irving Music, Inc., BMI, courtesy of A&M Records
"Love My Way," The Psychedelic Furs, by J. Ashton, T. Butler, R. Butler and V. Ely, Blackwood Music Inc., BMI, courtesy of Columbia Records
"Angst in My Pants," Sparks, by Ron Mael and Russell Mael, Hansa France Rights administered in USA & Canada by April Music Inc., ASCAP, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
"Jukebox," The Flirts, by B. Orlando, Jackaroe Music Publishers/Bobby "O" Music, ASCAP, courtesy of Vanguard Recording Society Inc./"O" Records
"I Melt with You," Modern English, by Modern English, Beggars Banquet Music, Ltd., ASCAP, courtesy of Sire Records
"I La-La-La Love You," Pat Travers, by Pat Travers, Black Pearl Music, ASCAP, courtesy of Polygram Records
"She Talks in Stereo," Gary Myrick and The Figures, by Gary Myrick, Not Suitable Music, ASCAP, courtesy of Epic Records
"Time to Win," Gary Myrick, by Gary Myrick, Jay Ferguson and Curly Smith, Not Suitable Music/Painless Music Inc./Curly Smith Music, ASCAP, courtesy of Epic Records
"Eaten by the Monster of Love," performed by Sparks, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
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DETAILS
Release Date:
1983
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 29 April 1983
Copyright Claimant:
Atlantic Releasing Corporation
Copyright Date:
7 October 1983
Copyright Number:
PA194584
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
92
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26992
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Teenager Julie Richman lives in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles County. At the Sherman Oaks Galleria, Julie shops with her friends Loryn, Stacey, and Suzi. Julie admits that she is tired of her boyfriend, Tommy, and would rather date Brad. On the escalator, Julie runs into Tommy and breaks up with him. When she returns his bracelet, Tommy warns that she will want him back. Later, at the beach, Loryn tells a friend about Suzi’s party that evening and Fred, a punk from Hollywood, overhears the address. As his friend Randy emerges from the ocean, the valley girls admire his body and Fred runs to tell him about the party. That night, Julie and Stacey dress in Julie’s bedroom and discuss Loryn’s self-proclaimed sexual prowess. Stacey warns Julie against flirting with Brad because Tommy will be at the party, but Julie is determined to make a connection with her latest infatuation. As the girls leave, Julie's parents, Steve and Sarah Richman, reminisce about being hippies. Julie talks to Brad at Suzi’s party, but he is unresponsive and Tommy reminds her that she'll soon be back with him. Meanwhile, Suzi tells her mother, Beth Brent, about her crush on Skip. Upstairs, Tommy waits for Loryn at the bathroom door and lures her into the bedroom. When Randy and Fred arrive at the party and hesitantly walk inside, Randy notices Julie. The boys’ punk style distinguishes them from the crowd of preppy valley teenagers. Randy encourages Fred to pursue Stacey while he approaches Julie. She is surprised to learn that Randy was the ... +


Teenager Julie Richman lives in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles County. At the Sherman Oaks Galleria, Julie shops with her friends Loryn, Stacey, and Suzi. Julie admits that she is tired of her boyfriend, Tommy, and would rather date Brad. On the escalator, Julie runs into Tommy and breaks up with him. When she returns his bracelet, Tommy warns that she will want him back. Later, at the beach, Loryn tells a friend about Suzi’s party that evening and Fred, a punk from Hollywood, overhears the address. As his friend Randy emerges from the ocean, the valley girls admire his body and Fred runs to tell him about the party. That night, Julie and Stacey dress in Julie’s bedroom and discuss Loryn’s self-proclaimed sexual prowess. Stacey warns Julie against flirting with Brad because Tommy will be at the party, but Julie is determined to make a connection with her latest infatuation. As the girls leave, Julie's parents, Steve and Sarah Richman, reminisce about being hippies. Julie talks to Brad at Suzi’s party, but he is unresponsive and Tommy reminds her that she'll soon be back with him. Meanwhile, Suzi tells her mother, Beth Brent, about her crush on Skip. Upstairs, Tommy waits for Loryn at the bathroom door and lures her into the bedroom. When Randy and Fred arrive at the party and hesitantly walk inside, Randy notices Julie. The boys’ punk style distinguishes them from the crowd of preppy valley teenagers. Randy encourages Fred to pursue Stacey while he approaches Julie. She is surprised to learn that Randy was the boy she saw on the beach that afternoon. Meanwhile, Loryn asks Tommy if they will be a couple because of the romantic interlude at Suzi's party and he criticizes her for betraying Julie. Tommy tells Loryn that he won’t disclose her disloyalty if she keeps the affair a secret. Back at the party, Tommy notices Randy flirting with Julie and starts a fight. When Fred and Randy are thrown out, Randy sees Julie watching from the window. As they drive away, Randy insists that he and Fred return to the party. Randy sneaks back in through the bathroom window and hides in the shower. In time, Julie uses the bathroom to apply makeup and Randy invites her to go for a ride. She agrees but insists on bringing Stacey. As Randy drives over the mountain to Hollywood, Stacey protests and insists that Julie keep their date with the punks a secret. At Fred and Randy’s hangout, a seedy club, the teens discuss the differences between suburban life in the valley and the less affluent, urban culture of Hollywood. Julie admits to feeling an emotional connection to Randy and they kiss. Later, as Randy and Julie make out in the car on Mulholland Drive, Fred chases Stacey. When Randy insists on seeing Julie the following day, she is embarrassed to admit that she works at her parents’ health food restaurant. Julie returns home at dawn, but Steve and Sarah unconvincingly claim they are not upset. During a driver's education class at school, Julie tells Loryn and Suzi about her evening with Randy, and Stacey is furious. As Julie becomes distracted from the driving course, the instructor leaps from the car. Julie’s friends warn that her reputation will be threatened if she dates outside of their social circle. Meanwhile, Skip delivers groceries to Beth. She attempts to seduce her daughter’s love interest, but says that Suzi will be home soon and suggests they meet again. Randy pays Julie a surprise visit at work and they leave for a date in the valley. Randy and Julie soon fall in love. At school, Tommy seeks out Loryn, Suzi, and Stacey to inquire about Julie’s recent preoccupation. He suggests that they pressure Julie into breaking up with Randy. That night at Suzi’s slumber party, the girls caution Julie that she will lose her popularity because of Randy. Later, Julie asks her father for advice. Steve shows Julie photographs of himself as a hippie and says that the way people look is less important than who they are inside. Torn between her love for Randy and her social life, Julie decides to appease her friends and break up with Randy. She announces her decision at a coffee shop, but Loryn is less enthusiastic than Suzi and Stacey because of her experience with Tommy. Just then, Tommy passes their table and the girls leave Julie alone with him. She tells Tommy that her relationship with Randy has ended and he gives her his bracelet to confirm their renewed commitment. That night, Randy arrives at Julie's house unannounced and she turns him away. Realizing that Julie has been overcome by her friends’ desire for conformity, Randy becomes enraged and returns to Hollywood. In a drunken stupor, he makes love with a former girlfriend at the club. Later, Randy provokes a fight with gangsters. When Fred finds his friend beaten in an alleyway, he encourages Randy to pursue Julie. Over the next several weeks, Randy shows Julie his determination with a series of surprise encounters, but she is not swayed. Back on Mulholland Drive overlooking the valley, Randy is desperate and Fred offers to devise a plan for revenge on Tommy. Some time later, Skip returns to the Brent household and finds Suzi in her mother’s shower. Beth catches them making love in her bedroom. On prom night, Tommy picks up Julie in a limousine and Steve smokes marijuana to relieve his anxiety. Fred and Randy secretly watch as the event begins, but when Randy asks Fred to reveal his strategy for the evening, his friend admits that he has nothing more planned. As Tommy and Julie wait backstage to be announced prom king and queen, Randy punches Tommy. The boys continue to fight while the music cues the prom king and queen to accept their honor. After Randy subdues Tommy, he escorts Julie off stage. Tommy runs after them, but Julie throws a paper plate of food in his face, inciting a food fight. Randy and Julie run outside and jump into Tommy’s limousine. As they drive away, Julie tosses Tommy's bracelet out the window.
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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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