The Fugitive (1993)

PG-13 | 130 mins | Drama | 1993

Producer:

Arnold Kopelson

Cinematographer:

Michael Chapman

Production Designer:

Dennis Washington

Production Company:

Warner Bros., Inc.
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HISTORY


       The film was based on the television series The Fugitive starring David Janssen and created by Roy Huggins, which ran on ABC from 1963 to 1967.
       According to production notes in the AMPAS research library, producer Arnold Kopelson developed the film for five years. A 27 Aug 1992 DV article announced Harrison Ford’s renewed interest in the role of Dr. Richard Kimble, which he had considered three years prior when director Stephen Frears was in discussions to direct. In the interim, Walter Hill was attached as director with Alec Baldwin cast in the role of Dr. Kimble. Andrew Davis was chosen to direct after Ford replaced Baldwin. The DV article noted that Ford had previously replaced Baldwin in the role of Jack Ryan, which Baldwin played in The Hunt for Red October (1990, see entry), and Ford played Ryan in Patriot Games (1992) and Clear and Present Danger (1994, see entries). After Ford committed to the project, Kopelson claimed that the actor was “an integral part of the production process,” contributing to “creative decisions, such as rewriting, casting, art direction, set design, and costumes."
       In a 2 Dec 1992 DV news item, Kopelson described the film’s budget as “$30 million plus.” According to production notes, The Fugitive was shot over fifteen weeks in Chicago and North Carolina. For the train wreck, the crew traveled to Dillsboro, North Carolina and used the Smokey Mountain Railway. The train weighed 250,000 pounds and was derailed at 45 miles per hour. Also according to production notes, Davis filmed the Chicago St. Patrick’s Day Parade in ... More Less


       The film was based on the television series The Fugitive starring David Janssen and created by Roy Huggins, which ran on ABC from 1963 to 1967.
       According to production notes in the AMPAS research library, producer Arnold Kopelson developed the film for five years. A 27 Aug 1992 DV article announced Harrison Ford’s renewed interest in the role of Dr. Richard Kimble, which he had considered three years prior when director Stephen Frears was in discussions to direct. In the interim, Walter Hill was attached as director with Alec Baldwin cast in the role of Dr. Kimble. Andrew Davis was chosen to direct after Ford replaced Baldwin. The DV article noted that Ford had previously replaced Baldwin in the role of Jack Ryan, which Baldwin played in The Hunt for Red October (1990, see entry), and Ford played Ryan in Patriot Games (1992) and Clear and Present Danger (1994, see entries). After Ford committed to the project, Kopelson claimed that the actor was “an integral part of the production process,” contributing to “creative decisions, such as rewriting, casting, art direction, set design, and costumes."
       In a 2 Dec 1992 DV news item, Kopelson described the film’s budget as “$30 million plus.” According to production notes, The Fugitive was shot over fifteen weeks in Chicago and North Carolina. For the train wreck, the crew traveled to Dillsboro, North Carolina and used the Smokey Mountain Railway. The train weighed 250,000 pounds and was derailed at 45 miles per hour. Also according to production notes, Davis filmed the Chicago St. Patrick’s Day Parade in real time, so the filmmakers were only able to utilize the three-hour window of the parade to shoot the street chase in which Sam Gerard pursues Richard Kimble.
       A 14 Jul 1993 WSJ article discussed Warner Bros.’ TV ads for the film, which were estimated by a rival studio executive to cost between $12 and $15 million. The studio aired long 90-second advertisements nightly on several networks to attract not only existing fans but younger people with no knowledge of the television series, in order to make the most of their PG-13 rating.
       The film opened in 2,000 theaters on August 6, 1993 to positive reviews. Critics appreciated the story-driven suspense, unfettered by excessive violence, gratuitous pop songs, or bad language. Var described the film as “a consummate nail-biter that never lags…has a sympathetic lead, a stunning antagonist, state-of-the-art special effects, top-of-the-line craftsmanship and a taut screenplay.” According to Box Office Mojo, the film earned $187,875,760 during its theatrical run.
       The film was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Tommy Lee Jones won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor.

       The end credits contain a “Special Thanks” to the following organizations: Mayor and the People of the City of Chicago; Chicago Film Office; The Chicago Police Department; Illinois Film Office; University of Chicago Hospitals; Cook County Hospital; Cook County Sheriff’s Department; Cook County Jail; Chicago Transit Authority; Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago; Graham County Rescue Squad; United States Marshal Service for the Northern District of Illinois; Great Smoky Mountains Railway, North Carolina.


Academic Network participant. University of Texas, Austin. Advisor: Prof. Janet Staiger; Student: Tate. lfr 09/2010 NOTE 9 Feb 93 HR prod chart lists 3 Feb 1993 as first day of princ photog. Stub by MSG More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
27 Aug 1992.
---
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1992.
---
Daily Variety
10 Aug 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Aug 1993
p. 5, 28.
Los Angeles Times
6 Aug 1993
p. 1.
New York Times
6 Aug 1993
p. 1.
Variety
9 Aug 1993
p. 34.
WSJ
14 Jul 1993.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Keith Barish/Arnold Kopelson Production
An Andrew Davis Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir, 2d unit - North Carolina
Dir, 2d unit - Chicago
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir, 2d unit - North Carolina
1st asst dir, 2d unit - Chicago
2d asst dir
2d asst dir, 2d unit - North Carolina
2d asst dir, 2d unit - Chicago
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-prod
Co-prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog, 2d unit - North Carolina and 2d uni
Dir of photog, 2d unit - Chicago
"A" cam op
"B" cam/Steadicam op
"B" cam/Steadicam op
Cam op, 2d unit - North Carolina
Cam op, 2d unit - North Carolina
Aerial cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Video assist
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Rigging gaffer
Key grip, 2d unit - North Carolina
Best boy
Best boy, 2d unit - North Carolina
Dolly grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const coord, 2d unit - North Carolina
Leadman
Leadman
MUSIC
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Scoring mixer
Score co-prod by
Orch cond
Saxophone solos by
Courtesy of Elektra Entertainment
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Supv dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Sd fx ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR asst
ADR asst
ADR asst
ADR asst
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff coord
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Visual eff supv
Spec visual eff by
Introvision prod
Cam, Introvision
Cam, Introvision
Art dir, Introvision
Model shop supv
Model maker
Miniature pyrotechnics
Processed flashback fx
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Key hair stylist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Chicago casting by
Chicago casting by
Casting assoc
Chicago casting asst
Chicago extras casting
North Carolina casting
Helicopter pilot, Chicago
Helicopter pilot, Chicago
Helicopter pilot, North Carolina
Video & computer supv
Computer engineering & graphics
Loc mgr, 2d unit - North Carolina
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst, 2d unit - North Carolina
DGA trainee
DGA trainee
Prod accountant
Prod secy
Prod secy, 2d unit - North Carolina
Asst prod secy
Asst prod secy
Exec asst
Asst to Mr. Davis
Asst to Mr. Davis
Asst to Mr. Ford
Asst to Mr. Kopelson
Asst to Mr. Kopelson
Asst to Mr. Macgregor-Scott
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Transportation coord
Transportation coord, 2d unit - North Carolina
Transportation capt
Unit pub
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Roy Huggins.
AUTHOR
MUSIC
Saxophone solos by Wayne Shorter, courtesy of Elektra Entertainment.
SONGS
"The Thrill Is Gone," written by Roy Hawkins and Rick Darnell, performed by B. B. King and Bobby Bland, courtesy of MCA Records
"Tahiti Tahiti," written by Marc Chantereau, Pierre-Alain Dahan and Slim Pezin, performed by Voyage, courtesy of Productions Sirocco.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 6 August 1993
New York opening: week of 6 August 1993
Production Date:
began 3 February 1993
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, a division of Time Warner Entertainment Company, LP
Copyright Date:
5 October 1993
Copyright Number:
PA659535
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
Astro Color Laboratories, Inc.
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with Panavision® cameras and lenses; Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
130
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32575
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Helen Kimble, the wife of Dr. Richard Kimble, struggles against an attacker. She wields a gun, but the attacker twists it from her grip and shoots her. Shortly before midnight, the Chicago police arrive at the Kimble residence. Officers escort Richard to the station for further questioning. Meanwhile, a local reporter informs viewers that the circumstances of Helen's murder are vague, but they do know that the Kimbles attended a fundraiser earlier that evening. In the interrogation room, Richard sits silently and reflects. Earlier that night, at a fundraising gala, Dr. Charles Nichols returns Richard's car keys, having borrowed the vehicle earlier that day. Helen eyes Richard as she endures a boring conversation with Dr. Alec Lentz. Later, on the ride home, Richard receives a call to assist in a late-night operation. Helen promises to wait up for him. Back in the interrogation room, Richard snaps out of his memories as two officers question him about the scratches on his neck. Richard admits that Helen scratched him as he tried to move her, and becomes irate when he realizes the officers suspect him of murdering his wife for a hefty insurance policy. Richard insists that a one-armed man broke into his house and killed Helen, but officers observing him from a two-way mirror believe Richard to be the prime suspect. Some time later, a judge sentences Richard to death after he is found guilty of murdering his wife. On a bus to the state penitentiary, Richard watches a fellow prisoner fake a seizure. When a guard unlocks the cage to help, the prisoner stabs him. An older guard shoots the prisoner, and, during a struggle with another convict, accidentally ... +


Helen Kimble, the wife of Dr. Richard Kimble, struggles against an attacker. She wields a gun, but the attacker twists it from her grip and shoots her. Shortly before midnight, the Chicago police arrive at the Kimble residence. Officers escort Richard to the station for further questioning. Meanwhile, a local reporter informs viewers that the circumstances of Helen's murder are vague, but they do know that the Kimbles attended a fundraiser earlier that evening. In the interrogation room, Richard sits silently and reflects. Earlier that night, at a fundraising gala, Dr. Charles Nichols returns Richard's car keys, having borrowed the vehicle earlier that day. Helen eyes Richard as she endures a boring conversation with Dr. Alec Lentz. Later, on the ride home, Richard receives a call to assist in a late-night operation. Helen promises to wait up for him. Back in the interrogation room, Richard snaps out of his memories as two officers question him about the scratches on his neck. Richard admits that Helen scratched him as he tried to move her, and becomes irate when he realizes the officers suspect him of murdering his wife for a hefty insurance policy. Richard insists that a one-armed man broke into his house and killed Helen, but officers observing him from a two-way mirror believe Richard to be the prime suspect. Some time later, a judge sentences Richard to death after he is found guilty of murdering his wife. On a bus to the state penitentiary, Richard watches a fellow prisoner fake a seizure. When a guard unlocks the cage to help, the prisoner stabs him. An older guard shoots the prisoner, and, during a struggle with another convict, accidentally shoots the bus driver, causing the bus to careen off the road onto a railroad track. The older guard unlocks Richard’s handcuffs so he can administer medical care to the younger guard, then flees when he sees a train approaching. Seconds before the train collides with the bus, Richard pushes the injured young guard out a window and jumps to safety. Copeland, a fellow prisoner, helps Richard unlock his shackles, and the two run in separate directions. Soon after, Sam Gerard and his team of Federal Marshals arrive at the crash site where the local police have begun an investigation. The old guard claims that he saved the young guard and that all prisoners perished, but Gerard disproves him after the empty shackles are found. Gerard announces that Dr. Richard Kimble is a fugitive. On the run, Richard steals a mechanic's coveralls and goes to a local hospital. He cares for his wounds, shaves off his beard, and steals a sleeping patient’s clothes. An officer passes in the hallway, but Richard eludes him. However, as Richard leaves the building, the wounded guard arrives in an ambulance and recognizes him. Wearing a doctor’s coat, Richard gives orders to the paramedics who take the young guard inside, then steals the ambulance and speeds away. Gerard and his team catch up with Richard via helicopter. Richard enters a tunnel that runs through a viaduct and stops the ambulance. Leaving the vehicle, he escapes into the sewer, but Gerard and his partner, Cosmo, are close behind. Gerard wades through the sewage pipe in pursuit. When he slips and loses his gun, Richard retrieves it. Holding Gerard at gunpoint, Richard pleads that he did not kill Helen. Gerard responds, “I don’t care,” and continues in pursuit of Richard to the end of the pipe where the water drops into a massive viaduct. Gerard uses another gun strapped inside his jacket to arrest Richard, but Richard makes the desperate decision to leap, falling hundreds of feet into the churning water below. Although his team members believe that Richard has perished, Gerard insists they continue their pursuit. Emerging from the river, Richard finds a wooded area and rests. He dreams of Helen and her murder. The next morning, Gerard and his crew head back to Chicago. Richard dyes his hair darker and hitchhikes back to Chicago as well. Gerard and his team locate Copeland at an ex-lover's home. Copeland holds hostage young Marshal Newman, but Gerard defuses the altercation by firing two quick bullets to Copeland's head. A despondent Newman questions Gerard's risky methods, to which the latter replies, "I don't bargain." Richard calls his lawyer from a payphone and asks for money. Gerard monitors the call and deduces that Richard is now in Chicago. Later, Richard stops Dr. Nichols outside his country club and asks for cash. Nichols offers his help, but Richard quickly leaves. Gerard instructs his crew to allow Richard to "re-enter his life," so his capture may be easier. Richard rents a basement apartment then heads to the prosthetics department at Cook County Hospital, where he steals a maintenance identification badge and uniform as a disguise. Gerard later questions Nichols, who admits that he has recently seen Richard, but insists on his innocence. Haunted by nightmares of Helen’s murder, Richard uses his new disguise to research prosthetics patients at the hospital, in search of the one-armed man. At his basement apartment, Richard awakens to police cars swarming outside. However, the officers are there to arrest a drug dealer upstairs. At the station, the drug-dealer informs the police that Richard has been living in the basement of his building. At the hospital, Richard steals files for a handful of patients who match the one-armed man’s age and prosthetic type. In the hallway, facing a large influx of patients, a female doctor asks Richard to take a young patient to an observation room. Richard checks the patient’s x-rays and discovers that he needs emergency surgery, so he delivers him to the operating room instead. Meanwhile, Gerard searches Richard's apartment and finds evidence that Richard has been spending time at Cook County Hospital. When the female doctor learns that Richard overrode her orders, she takes his badge and calls security, but Richard runs away. Gerard arrives at the hospital and realizes that Kimble has been conducting his own investigation. Gerard creates his own list of suspects from the database of prosthetics patients. Later, Richard visits a convict who may be his wife’s killer, but discovers in the visitation room that the man is black. Gerard spots Richard as he leaves City Hall. However, Richard eludes Gerard and Cosmo as he blends into the St. Patrick's Day Parade outside. Some time later, Richard breaks into the home of another on his list, Fredrick Sykes. Inside, he finds a picture of Sykes with Dr. Lentz, whom he met at the gala the night of Helen’s murder. He also finds indications that Sykes works for the pharmaceutical company Devlin-MacGregor. Convinced that Sykes is his wife’s killer, Richard calls Gerard from the Sykes’ phone and leaves it off the hook so the call can be traced. As Gerard and his team investigate, Sykes arrives and indicates that he works security for Devlin-MacGregor. Gerard finds Sykes suspicious. Over the phone, Richard reveals to Nichols that he thinks Devlin-MacGregor and Lentz were after him because he discovered that their drug, RDU-90, caused liver damage. Richard believes Lentz had something to do with Helen’s murder, but Nichols informs Richard that Lentz is now dead. At their office, Gerard and Cosmo discuss Devlin-MacGregor's annual profits, becoming suspicious of Lentz as well. Richard receives help from medical archivist Bones, who gives him a tissue sample of a patient who used Provasic, Devlin-MacGregor's drug containing RDU-90. Lab analyst Cathy helps Richard discover that the original tissue samples have been replaced with healthy samples. Though Richard suspects Lentz of forging the samples, Cathy determines that half of the approved samples were signed for on the day of Lentz’s death. Richard then realizes that Nichols, who also supervised the study, must have approved the false samples. At the same time, Newman questions Bones and discovers that Nichols was Lentz’s boss, disproving Nichols’ former statement to Gerard that he had never met Lentz. Leaving the hospital, Richard boards a train on his way to confront Nichols. Sykes follows him on board and shoots a cop in his pursuit of Richard. Richard subdues Sykes, secures him to a railing using the injured cop’s handcuffs, and leaves the train. Gerard learns of Richard's train fight and heads toward the hotel-based medical conference where Richard confronts Nichols. Interrupting Nichols’ speech promoting Provasic, Richard physically battles with Nichols. The fight continues to the hotel's roof, where a police helicopter pursues the men. Richard pushes Nichols through a skylight, and they both fall into an elevator shaft. The elevator travels down to the laundry room, where Richard continues to chase Nichols. Gerard and Cosmo arrive, and Gerard calls out to Richard that he knows the truth about Helen's murder, urging him to give up the chase. Just before Nichols has the chance to shoot Gerard, Richard knocks him to the ground. Driving away from the scene in an unmarked car, Gerard uncuffs Richard.
+

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Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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