They Went That-A-Way & That-A-Way (1978)

PG | 106 mins | Comedy | 5 October 1978

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HISTORY

An article by Hedy Kleyweg in the 13 Mar 1978 issuue of HR announced that Atlanta-based TIPS, The International Picture Show Company, would open a west coast regional distribution office in Los Angeles on 15 Mar 1978 to distribute TIPS productions to the thirteen Western states. Kleyweg also reported that They Went That-a-Way & That-a-Way, would be the second TIPS production (after The Billion Dollar Hobo, 1978, see entry), and would begin principal photography on 3 Apr 1978. A 3 Aug 1978 DV story announced the opening of additional TIPS offices in Chicago, IL; San Francisco, CA; and Dallas, TX, and stated that They Went That-a-Way & That-a-Way, would open 5 Oct 1978 in Atlanta, GA. According to a 24 May 1978 item in HR, the film's premiere was scheduled to take place at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta on 17 Aug. The film opened in Los Angeles at the Fairfax Theater on 29 Nov 1978.
       The Samuel Goldwyn Television Company acquired television and non-theatrical rights to They Went That-a-Way & That-a-Way and The Billion Dollar Hobo, as reported in the 29 Jun 1978 issue of HR.
       Among the Georgia locations used in the film were the Nunnally estate on Blackland Road in Atlanta, then owned by Prince Faisal M. Saud al Kabir; and the office of then Georgia governor George Busbee.
       A 20 Aug 1980 article in Var outlined a lawsuit filed by TIPS against the Directors Guild of America (DGA) over the "right to make individual contracts that conflict with guild ...

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An article by Hedy Kleyweg in the 13 Mar 1978 issuue of HR announced that Atlanta-based TIPS, The International Picture Show Company, would open a west coast regional distribution office in Los Angeles on 15 Mar 1978 to distribute TIPS productions to the thirteen Western states. Kleyweg also reported that They Went That-a-Way & That-a-Way, would be the second TIPS production (after The Billion Dollar Hobo, 1978, see entry), and would begin principal photography on 3 Apr 1978. A 3 Aug 1978 DV story announced the opening of additional TIPS offices in Chicago, IL; San Francisco, CA; and Dallas, TX, and stated that They Went That-a-Way & That-a-Way, would open 5 Oct 1978 in Atlanta, GA. According to a 24 May 1978 item in HR, the film's premiere was scheduled to take place at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta on 17 Aug. The film opened in Los Angeles at the Fairfax Theater on 29 Nov 1978.
       The Samuel Goldwyn Television Company acquired television and non-theatrical rights to They Went That-a-Way & That-a-Way and The Billion Dollar Hobo, as reported in the 29 Jun 1978 issue of HR.
       Among the Georgia locations used in the film were the Nunnally estate on Blackland Road in Atlanta, then owned by Prince Faisal M. Saud al Kabir; and the office of then Georgia governor George Busbee.
       A 20 Aug 1980 article in Var outlined a lawsuit filed by TIPS against the Directors Guild of America (DGA) over the "right to make individual contracts that conflict with guild agreements." Edward Montagne was said to have been hired as director on the film for a period of three weeks at a salary of $20,000. Montagne was apparently replaced by Stuart E. McGowan, and subsequently filed an arbitration action against That Way Productions and received a $25,000 award on the basis that the minimum DGA fee for a feature film was $45,000. Unable to collect the award from the production company, the DGA sought to collect from the distributor TIPS, which in turn prompted TIPS to take legal action. The outcome of this suit has not been determined.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1978
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 1978
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 1978
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 1978
---
Variety
6 Dec 1978
p. 32
Variety
20 Aug 1980
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Stuart E. McGowan
Dir
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Pres/Exec prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog/Cam op
1st asst cam
Ayne Stewart Coffey
2d asst cam
Still man
Gaffer
Best boy
2d elec
Key grip
Best boy
Set grip
Set grip
Asst grip
Asst grip
Crane op
Crane op
Lighting equip
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
D.E.B. Film Services, Inc.
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Set dresser
Set dresser
Plant des
COSTUMES
Cost des
1st ward girl
2d ward girl
MUSIC
Mus prod by
Mus mixer
SOUND
Boom woman
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup
Asst makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Post prod co-ord/Casting
Extra casting
Prod asst
Prod's representative
Cinemobile driver
Utility driver
Loc facilities
Prod secy
Prod bookkeeper
Loc auditor
Security man
Prod services
General Partner, Filmway Associates
STAND INS
Stunt coord/Stunts
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
SOURCES
SONGS
"That-A-Way," lyrics by Herb Martin; "Love Monster," music by Wayne White, singer Shack Jones.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 October 1978
Premiere Information:
Benefit premiere screening at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta, GA: 17 Aug 1978; Atlanta-area opening: 5 Oct 1978; Los Angeles opening: 29 Nov 1978
Production Date:
began 3 Apr 1978
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
The International Picture Show Company
5 February 1979
PA25114
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Color by Deluxe®
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
106
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Parked behind a billboard in a speed trap, Powder Springs police officers Dewey and Wallace get on each other’s nerves as they wait for speeding drivers to pass by. Dewey calls in to the police station by car radio, but gets only passing attention from Bill, his commanding officer. While Dewey attempts to get his attention, Bill receives a phone call from Governor Ron Clark asking him to look out for some of the governor’s friends who will be coming into town on a visit. A speeding foreign sports car races by their position, with Dewey and Wallace taking off in pursuit. Unfortunately, their gas pedal gets stuck and they wreak havoc on the town before finally crashing into the police station. Seeing a way out of having to deal with his incompetent staff, Bill recommends Dewey and Wallace to the Governor for positions with the state police. At the state capitol, Governor Clark gives his new officers an assignment: to pose as inmates of the Goose Creek Prison Farm, become friendly with prisoner Butch Collins, and find out what has become of the $200 thousand in government funds that Collins stole twenty years before. The governor gives Dewey and Wallace a month to obtain the information. He also informs them that only the three of them know anything about this clandestine effort, and the governor’s staff will disavow any knowledge of their actions. On their first day at the prison farm, Dewey and Wallace run afoul of a prisoner named Brick and his hangers-on when Dewey points Brick out as the one who threw a rock at ...

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Parked behind a billboard in a speed trap, Powder Springs police officers Dewey and Wallace get on each other’s nerves as they wait for speeding drivers to pass by. Dewey calls in to the police station by car radio, but gets only passing attention from Bill, his commanding officer. While Dewey attempts to get his attention, Bill receives a phone call from Governor Ron Clark asking him to look out for some of the governor’s friends who will be coming into town on a visit. A speeding foreign sports car races by their position, with Dewey and Wallace taking off in pursuit. Unfortunately, their gas pedal gets stuck and they wreak havoc on the town before finally crashing into the police station. Seeing a way out of having to deal with his incompetent staff, Bill recommends Dewey and Wallace to the Governor for positions with the state police. At the state capitol, Governor Clark gives his new officers an assignment: to pose as inmates of the Goose Creek Prison Farm, become friendly with prisoner Butch Collins, and find out what has become of the $200 thousand in government funds that Collins stole twenty years before. The governor gives Dewey and Wallace a month to obtain the information. He also informs them that only the three of them know anything about this clandestine effort, and the governor’s staff will disavow any knowledge of their actions. On their first day at the prison farm, Dewey and Wallace run afoul of a prisoner named Brick and his hangers-on when Dewey points Brick out as the one who threw a rock at the head guard. They also run afoul of the Warden, when Dewey accidentally breaks his office window. With no spare beds in the prison dorm, Dewey takes a folding cot; but Wallace is persuaded by Brick to use Duke’s upper bunk until he returns from solitary confinement in the “hot box.” What Brick knows and Wallace does not, is that Duke is due to return that night. When Wallace does not respond to his prodding, Duke lifts the end of the bunk and sends Wallace sliding off the mattress and out the window. When the wake-up siren sounds the next morning, Wallace is doubled up in the folding cot with Dewey. When they inquire about Butch Collins, the other prisoners tell Dewey and Wallace that he has been hit on the head and does not remember much. It turns out that Butch is a trustee in the prison kitchen. He receives packages of chocolate brownies in the mail from his sister. The brownies contain money from the bank job, and Butch cuts them open, pulls out the bills, and stuffs the money in a tea can before distributing the brownies to his fellow inmates. The long-time inmates become suspicious that Dewey and Wallace somehow know about Butch’s “secret.” When the prison doctor is let out of prison, Dewey gets tapped to take over the infirmary because his fictional prisoner profile erroneously states that he attended medical school for two years. Dewey’s first patient is the warden, who needs to have a tooth pulled. The warden demands a shot of Novocain, but Dewey accidentally injects his own right hand, losing all feeling in his hand and arm. With his arm flopping around, Dewey also manages to stick the hypodermic needle in his right leg. With great difficulty Dewey manages to get the needle close to the Warden’s mouth, but he holds it backwards and gives himself a shot in the forehead. Unable to coordinate his movements, Dewey manages to destroy the prison dentist’s office, and in his rage the warden assigns Dewey and Wallace to the “hot box.” Late at night, as Butch Collins prepares the daily baking for the prison camp, he is accosted by Duke, who tells Butch he wants the $200 thousand right away. Butch replies that he received another $3 thousand today, bringing the total on hand to $45 thousand. Duke replies that the money is not coming in quickly enough, and only when he and his colleagues receive the full $200 thousand will Butch and his sister be safe. Later, when Wallace attempts to stand up to Duke’s bullying, he is challenged to a boxing match. Wallace reluctantly agrees to the bout, but is flattened with one punch when he gets into the ring. As Wallace recovers, laid out in the kitchen, Dewey offers to make him some iced tea and discovers the hidden cash. Wallace tells Dewey they will need to keep their eyes on the money until they are released from prison on the coming Saturday. However, the next morning when the prisoners are called to assembly, they are told that Governor Ron Clark, the only other person to know of their undercover assignment, has suddenly died of a heart attack. Dewey and Wallace attempt to explain their predicament to the warden, but he has them thrown out of his office. Dutch informs Brick that Butch has received another shipment of brownies, and that if they are the “right flavor,” they will be set to break out of prison. Dutch warns Brick that they must not get into trouble. If one of them is thrown in the “hot box” it will delay plans for escape. Dewey and Wallace are working in the kitchen during mess the next morning, and observe Dutch passing some of the stolen money to Brick and other prisoners. Discovering the tea can is empty, Wallace and Dewey overpower the warden and guards, and take their guns. Wallace tells the prisoners to fill the tea can with the money. Then they escape in a truck with the warden’s wife and his deputy as hostages. Unaware that the police radio in the truck is turned on, Wallace reveals that they are headed for the governor’s house. The warden attempts to alert the state police, but he and his men are again overpowered—this time by Dutch on the other inmates, who steal their uniforms and leave them tied up. To avoid being spotted, Wallace and Dewey stop at a gas station to changes vehicles, an add the station owner his wife, their dog, and an egg deliveryman to their entourage of hostages. However, the extra weight makes it impossible to get the car on the road. A rock band, touring in their customized hearse, stops at the station and Wallace purloins the hearse at gunpoint to be their new getaway car. Meanwhile, the escaped prisoners set out in pursuit, but opt to take a shortcut to the governor’s house and wait there for Dewey and Wallace to arrive. Posing as officers, the prisoners arrive during a reception for the Japanese consul, and tell the new governor that they are there to guard against a bomb threat. Wallace and Dewey manage to arrive unnoticed by the escaped prisoners. They waylay a Japanese interpreter, and Dewey dons his formal suit. With the aid of a wig and a pair of glasses, Dewey manages to pass as the interpreter, while Wallace finds and puts on a Geisha costume. They are escorted to the governor’s table, but are unable to communicate to the governor that they have the tea can with the money. Spotted by the escaped prisoners, a melee ensues. The guests, terrified over the bomb threat, panic and run, disrupting the escaped prisoners as they attempt to shoot down the escaping Dewey and Wallace, who in turn are headed off by an army of Confederate re-enactors on hand to perform for the Japanese ambassador. The state police, national guard and the warden all arrive and converge on Dewey and Wallace as they try to get away with the tea can full of cash. When everything is sorted out, Wallace ends up as the new warden at Goose Creek Prison Farm, and Dewey is his deputy.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Subject (Minor):
Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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