Inside Moves (1980)

PG | 113 mins | Drama | 12 December 1980

Director:

Richard Donner

Cinematographer:

Laszlo Kovacs

Editor:

Frank Moriss

Production Designer:

Charles Rosen

Production Company:

Goodmark Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

End credits include “A Special Thanks to”: “The management and team members of the Golden State Warriors, the Phoenix Suns, and the Indiana Pacers,” and, “ADEPT (Assisting the Disabled with Employment Placement and Training) Panorama City, CA.”
       On 6 Mar 1978, Publishers Weekly announced that Paramount Pictures’ 20 Feb 1978 acquisition of screen rights to the upcoming Todd Walton 1978 novel, Inside Moves, was followed by a lucrative deal with New American Library. Anticipating a hit film, the publisher purchased paperback rights to the novel for $150,000, with an additional $50,000 to be paid during film production and bonus $100,000 “increments” based on its performance as a best seller.
       According to studio production notes in AMPAS library files, the picture’s nine-week shooting schedule began 31 Jan 1980 without a distribution deal. By that time, Paramount had dropped out of the project, and it was being independently financed by first-time producers Mark M. Tanz and R. W. Goodwin’s Goodmark Productions, Inc., as noted in a 7 Dec 1981 DV news item. A 20 Feb 1980 Var brief announced the casting of double-amputee Harold Russell, who won an Academy Award for his the role of “Homer Parrish,” a disabled WWII veteran, in William Wyler’s The Best Years of Our Lives (1946, see entry).
       No director, producer, or filming schedule for Inside Moves was publicized as of the 20 Feb 1980 Var news item, despite the fact that production was already underway, but a 10 Mar 1980 HR news item listed Richard Donner as director, and noted that he was ... More Less

End credits include “A Special Thanks to”: “The management and team members of the Golden State Warriors, the Phoenix Suns, and the Indiana Pacers,” and, “ADEPT (Assisting the Disabled with Employment Placement and Training) Panorama City, CA.”
       On 6 Mar 1978, Publishers Weekly announced that Paramount Pictures’ 20 Feb 1978 acquisition of screen rights to the upcoming Todd Walton 1978 novel, Inside Moves, was followed by a lucrative deal with New American Library. Anticipating a hit film, the publisher purchased paperback rights to the novel for $150,000, with an additional $50,000 to be paid during film production and bonus $100,000 “increments” based on its performance as a best seller.
       According to studio production notes in AMPAS library files, the picture’s nine-week shooting schedule began 31 Jan 1980 without a distribution deal. By that time, Paramount had dropped out of the project, and it was being independently financed by first-time producers Mark M. Tanz and R. W. Goodwin’s Goodmark Productions, Inc., as noted in a 7 Dec 1981 DV news item. A 20 Feb 1980 Var brief announced the casting of double-amputee Harold Russell, who won an Academy Award for his the role of “Homer Parrish,” a disabled WWII veteran, in William Wyler’s The Best Years of Our Lives (1946, see entry).
       No director, producer, or filming schedule for Inside Moves was publicized as of the 20 Feb 1980 Var news item, despite the fact that production was already underway, but a 10 Mar 1980 HR news item listed Richard Donner as director, and noted that he was concurrently filming a less violent, family-friendly version of the picture for television. At that time, the film had already been rated R by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), but the decision was successfully appealed, and Inside Moves was released with a PG rating.
       During production, a 4 Apr 1980 DV article stated that the set for Oakland, CA’s two-story “Max’s Bar” was constructed in a garage in the Echo Park district of Los Angeles, CA. The space was reportedly rented for $1,600 a month, with an additional cost of $140,000 for material and labor. Also included were adjoining facades and a gas station set “across the street” from Max’s Bar. Production designer Charles Rosen stated that the set for Max’s Bar was based on New York City’s oldest bar, McSorley’s Old Ale House. The crew filmed at the garage for nearly two months. In addition, filming took place at Echo Park Lake.
       When production was complete, Donner screened two twenty-minute “featurettes” at the May 1980 Cannes Film which resulted in extensive interest from distributors, according to production notes. Associated Film Division secured domestic distribution rights, while Producers Sales Organization contracted the picture for foreign sales.
       The film marked actor David Morse’s feature film debut.
       Inside Moves was released to mixed, but generally positive reviews. Although the 10 Dec 1980 Var complained the picture was a “highly conventional and predictable look at handicapped citizens trying to make it in everyday life,” the 19 Dec 1980 NYT stated that the film was “so effectively offbeat that it rises above its own potential for sappiness.”
       Inside Moves was nominated for one Academy Award in the category Actress in a Supporting Role (Diana Scarwid).
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Apr 1980
p. 2.
Daily Variety
7 Dec 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Mar 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Dec 1980
p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
18 Dec 1980
p. 1.
New York Times
19 Dec 1980
p. 18.
Publishers Weekly
6 Mar 1978
p. 34.
Variety
20 Feb 1980.
---
Variety
10 Dec 1980
p. 32.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring
Starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
+

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring
Starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Co-starring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
The Golden State Warriors
[and]
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Goodmark Production
A Richard Donner film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
2d unit dir/1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Asst dir trainee
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit dir of photog
2d unit dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Key grip
Dolly grip
Best boy
Grip
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst to the gaffer
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Video op
Loader
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set des
Set dec
Prop leadman
Prop leadman
Const coord
Paint foreman
Prop foreman
Prop foreman
Prop master
Asst prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus ed
Sound track compiled by
Sound track business affairs
Sound track creative services
Sound track mus coord
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom man
Cableman
Supv sd ed
Loop ed
Asst loop ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Foley mixer
Foley by
Vocal eff adv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Main title sequence & end credits prod and des by
New York
MAKEUP
Make-up supv
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec in charge of prod
Casting
Casting
Addl casting by
Basketball tech adv
Jerry's basketball double
Scr supv
Prod admin
Loc mgr
Prod coord
Asst to the prod
Asst to Richard Donner
Asst to Richard Donner
Asst to Richard Donner
Medical tech adv
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Post-prod accountant
Transportation capt
Transporation co-capt
Police coord
Policeman
Policeman
Fire safety officer
First aid
Craft services
Catering by SunRise
Cook/Driver
Cook/Driver
Unit pub
Cakes by
STAND INS
Roary's jump
Lucius' stunt double
Stunt driver
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Inside Moves by Todd Walton (Garden City, 1978).
AUTHOR
MUSIC
"Lonely Bull," performed by Herb Alpert, composed by Sal Lake, courtesy of A&M Records, Incorporated.
"Captain Bligh," performed by Count Basie & Zoot Sims, composed by Count Basie & Zoot Sims, courtesy of Pablo Records Inc.
SONGS
"Put Your Dreams Away," performed by Frank Sinatra, words and music by R. Lowe, P. Mann & S. Weiss, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
"What Have You Got To Lose," performed by Pablo Cruise, words and music by Eric Kaz & Gloria Loring, courtesy of A&M Records, Incorporated
"It's Your Move," performed by Leo Sayer, words and music by Michael Omartian, Michael Price & Dan Walsh, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
+
SONGS
"Put Your Dreams Away," performed by Frank Sinatra, words and music by R. Lowe, P. Mann & S. Weiss, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
"What Have You Got To Lose," performed by Pablo Cruise, words and music by Eric Kaz & Gloria Loring, courtesy of A&M Records, Incorporated
"It's Your Move," performed by Leo Sayer, words and music by Michael Omartian, Michael Price & Dan Walsh, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
"I Can't Tell You Why," performed by The Eagles, words and music by Timothy Schmit, Glenn Frey & Don Henley, courtesy of Elektra/Asylum Records
"Outside," performed by Ambrosia, words and music by Michael McDonald & David Pack, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
"Something's Missing (In My Life)," performed by Lady Sylvia, words and music by Paul Jabara & Jay Asher, courtesy of Full Moon/Warner Bros. Records Inc.
"Just Be Free," performed by The Spinners, words and music by Alvin Fields & Michael Zager, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corporation
"You Make It So Hard (To Say No)," performed by Boz Scaggs, words and music by Boz Scaggs, courtesy of Columbia Records and Tapes
"Beautiful Dreamer," performed by Lady Sylvia, words and music by Paul Jabara & Jay Asher, courtesy of Full Moon/Warner Bros. Records Inc.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 December 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 12 Dec 1980; New York opening: 19 Dec 1980
Production Date:
began 31 Jan 1980 in Los Angeles, California
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Color by Technicolor®
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®; Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
113
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Oakland, California, a man named Roary saunters into a high-rise building, takes an elevator to the tenth floor, and jumps out the window. However, his suicide attempt is thwarted by trees and a woman’s parked car. After convalescing at a hospital, Roary is discharged with an awkward limp and moves into a disheveled halfway house. One day, Roary discovers “Max’s Bar,” where a group of disabled comrades habitually play cards, and he returns the next day to befriend the regulars. Jerry Maxwell, a basketball virtuoso moonlighting as a bartender, introduces Roary to the gang, including “Stinky,” who is blind; “Wings,” a double-amputee with hooks for hands; and the wheelchair-bound “Blue Lewis.” When the men inquire about Roary’s injury, he admits to the attempted suicide and Stinky counters with humor, stating that Roary’s logic is backwards: people usually become crippled first, then commit suicide. As the men chuckle, Jerry’s girl friend, Ann, appears at the bar and Roary learns that the young woman works as a prostitute to support her heroin addiction. When Ann leaves, Jerry invites Roary to attend a Golden State Warriors’ basketball game that evening. There, Jerry annoys the team members by “coaching” them from the sidelines, but the Warriors lose by one point because star player Alvin Martin fails to shoot in the last two seconds of the game. Outraged, Jerry challenges Alvin to a one-on-one game the following day and Alvin agrees. Although Jerry outmaneuvers his opponent, he is hindered by his injured knee and loses by one point. Still, Jerry and Roary celebrate the close match. When Roary wonders aloud if there is ... +


In Oakland, California, a man named Roary saunters into a high-rise building, takes an elevator to the tenth floor, and jumps out the window. However, his suicide attempt is thwarted by trees and a woman’s parked car. After convalescing at a hospital, Roary is discharged with an awkward limp and moves into a disheveled halfway house. One day, Roary discovers “Max’s Bar,” where a group of disabled comrades habitually play cards, and he returns the next day to befriend the regulars. Jerry Maxwell, a basketball virtuoso moonlighting as a bartender, introduces Roary to the gang, including “Stinky,” who is blind; “Wings,” a double-amputee with hooks for hands; and the wheelchair-bound “Blue Lewis.” When the men inquire about Roary’s injury, he admits to the attempted suicide and Stinky counters with humor, stating that Roary’s logic is backwards: people usually become crippled first, then commit suicide. As the men chuckle, Jerry’s girl friend, Ann, appears at the bar and Roary learns that the young woman works as a prostitute to support her heroin addiction. When Ann leaves, Jerry invites Roary to attend a Golden State Warriors’ basketball game that evening. There, Jerry annoys the team members by “coaching” them from the sidelines, but the Warriors lose by one point because star player Alvin Martin fails to shoot in the last two seconds of the game. Outraged, Jerry challenges Alvin to a one-on-one game the following day and Alvin agrees. Although Jerry outmaneuvers his opponent, he is hindered by his injured knee and loses by one point. Still, Jerry and Roary celebrate the close match. When Roary wonders aloud if there is a treatment for his friend’s handicap, Jerry replies that surgeries have never been successful and he does not have enough money to pay for further treatment. Returning home, Jerry finds Ann bullied by two clients, who threaten him at knifepoint. When Roary surprises the criminals from behind, they run away. Despite Jerry’s love for the girl, he asks her to leave for good. Sometime later, bar owner, Max, suffers a heart attack and Roary visits him in the hospital. There, Jerry reveals that Max owes $11,000 to keep the tavern open, but the old man refuses to give up his establishment because it is a second home to disadvantaged members of the community. Roary offers to contribute his $10,000 trust fund and suggests that he and Jerry go into partnership. Learning of Roary’s wealth, Jerry begs his friend to pay for his knee operation, but Roary insists the bar take precedence because it is “family.” He convinces Jerry their business partnership will ultimately be lucrative enough to pay for his surgery. Reviving Max’s Bar, Roary adds a food menu and hires a pretty barmaid named Louise as Max slowly recovers. Still, Jerry is increasingly frustrated about his injury and his failure to fulfill his potential. Although he bemoans wasting thousands of dollars on Ann, she soon returns from San Francisco and they rekindle their romance. Sometime later, at Max’s Bar, Ann’s pimp, Lucius, arrives to recover a ring Ann stole. He threatens to murder Jerry if the ring is not returned. That night, Ann informs Jerry that she must reunite with Lucius to support her addiction. The pimp’s henchmen beat Jerry as Ann leaves. When Jerry is late to work the following evening, Roary finds his friend clinging to life. Jerry slowly recuperates and Roary encourages his friend to become a professional basketball player, but Jerry gives up hope. In response, Jerry’s cohorts from Max’s Bar drive to Alvin Martin’s mansion, and the basketball star agrees to loan money for Jerry’s operation. When Jerry refuses, Alvin insists the money represents “curiosity,” not charity, because Jerry may prove to be a professional player after all. Sometime later, Jerry leaves his friends for surgery at Stanford University, but fails to return. Months later, on Christmas day, the Max’s Bar gang throws a welcome home party for Jerry, but he slips away undetected after watching his friends from afar. Meanwhile, Roary and Louise dance cheek-to-cheek. When a bartender holds mistletoe over their heads, they kiss and the crowd cheers. As the party disbands, Roary receives a telephone call from Jerry, who invites him to an upscale tavern. There, Jerry announces his acceptance to a semi-professional basketball team but stipulates that the bar regulars are not invited to his first game. Back at Max’s, Jerry’s disabled friends are offended by the slight, but Roary and Louise join Alvin at the game, and Jerry leads the team to victory. Afterward, Roary escorts Louise home and they kiss. Although Louise declares her love for Roary, she insists they remain friends because his disability may provoke sexual difficulties, and she does not want to hurt him. Roary shrugs off the rejection, but still harbors affection for the girl. Later, at the bar, the regulars watch a television interview with Jerry, who has finally been accepted into the National Basketball Association (NBA). In the coming days, Roary shaves his beard and demonstrates his physical improvements to court Louise, but she admits to a secret relationship with Jerry. Betrayed by his closest friends, Roary returns to the building he jumped from, but refrains from a second suicide attempt, and instead confronts Jerry as he practices for his first NBA game the following evening. Noting Jerry’s selfishness and his failure to inquire about his own injury, Roary confesses that he tried to kill himself because he had no ambition. He now realizes he has infinitely more integrity than Jerry, who remains crippled by his own ego. That night, Louise visits Roary to announce the end of her relationship with Jerry and reveals her desire to become Roary’s lover. The next day, Jerry finally returns to Max’s Bar. He admits to being afraid of his friends’ disabilities, but now realizes he is the only “real cripple” among them. Fearing a lack of support, Jerry decides to opt out of his first NBA game that evening. However, the bar regulars encourage Jerry to follow his dream. That night, Max, who has recovered from his heart attack, decides to close the bar for the first time in twenty-five years so the comrades can attend Jerry’s game. Before they leave, Roary sees Ann on the street, still working as a prostitute and high on heroin. She begs Roary for money and insists Jerry will never succeed. At the game, Roary notices the arrival of Ann’s pimp, Lucius, and obstructs the pimp’s path down the stadium stairs. Lucius topples over, cowers in pain, and endures an injury of his own. Noticing the commotion, Jerry looks up from the court and makes eye contact Roary. The reunited friends lift their fists in solidarity. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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