The Animal Kingdom (1932)

78, 85 or 90 mins | Romance | 28 December 1932

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HISTORY

The Animal Kingdom was the first film to be screened commercially in RKO's Roxy Theatre. According to FD , The Animal Kingdom was an example of the kind of "adult fare" that production head David O. Selznick was pushing RKO to produce. Leslie Howard, William Gargan and Ilka Chase appeared in the Broadway production of Philip Barry's play and reprised their stage roles for this film. Gargan received $550 per week for his work, while Ann Harding earned $93,000 for the entire production. Karen Morley was announced as a cast member in HR . Modern sources state that Selznick wanted Morley for the role of "Cecilia," but eventually cast Myrna Loy for her superior beauty. RKO borrowed Loy from M-G-M for the film. Modern sources also claim that Katharine Hepburn, who was fired from the original Broadway production, vied for the part as well. Before Harding was cast, RKO considered Irene Dunne for the role of "Daisy," according to HR news items. According to a FD pre-production news item, screenwriter Horace Jackson was to assist in the casting of the film. FD news items claim that director Edward Griffith used a "new method" of filming for this production. To speed up filming, six small sets adjoining one another on one large set were built. This technique was designed to save ten days of shooting time. However, because Harding became ill, production was delayed by a week and actually took longer than usual. According to files in the MPAA/Collection at the AMPAS Library, RKO considered re-issuing Animal ... More Less

The Animal Kingdom was the first film to be screened commercially in RKO's Roxy Theatre. According to FD , The Animal Kingdom was an example of the kind of "adult fare" that production head David O. Selznick was pushing RKO to produce. Leslie Howard, William Gargan and Ilka Chase appeared in the Broadway production of Philip Barry's play and reprised their stage roles for this film. Gargan received $550 per week for his work, while Ann Harding earned $93,000 for the entire production. Karen Morley was announced as a cast member in HR . Modern sources state that Selznick wanted Morley for the role of "Cecilia," but eventually cast Myrna Loy for her superior beauty. RKO borrowed Loy from M-G-M for the film. Modern sources also claim that Katharine Hepburn, who was fired from the original Broadway production, vied for the part as well. Before Harding was cast, RKO considered Irene Dunne for the role of "Daisy," according to HR news items. According to a FD pre-production news item, screenwriter Horace Jackson was to assist in the casting of the film. FD news items claim that director Edward Griffith used a "new method" of filming for this production. To speed up filming, six small sets adjoining one another on one large set were built. This technique was designed to save ten days of shooting time. However, because Harding became ill, production was delayed by a week and actually took longer than usual. According to files in the MPAA/Collection at the AMPAS Library, RKO considered re-issuing Animal Kingdom in 1935 and 1937, but was informed by the PCA that they would not approve the film for censorship reasons. Modern sources state that in spite of initial good grosses in New York, the film lost RKO $110,000 in profits. In 1946, Peter Godfrey directed Dennis Morgan, Ann Sheridan and Alexis Smith in One More Tomorrow , Warner Bros.' version of Barry's play. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
16 Jul 32
p. 6.
Film Daily
19 Jul 32
p. 8.
Film Daily
16 Aug 32
p. 6.
Film Daily
5 Oct 32
p. 12.
Film Daily
12 Oct 32
p. 15.
Film Daily
18 Oct 32
p. 6.
Film Daily
15 Nov 32
p. 8.
Film Daily
23 Dec 32
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 32
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Aug 32
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 32
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Nov 32
p. 3.
International Photographer
1 Jan 33
p. 35.
Motion Picture Herald
10 Dec 32
p. 44.
New York Times
30 Dec 32
p. 14.
Variety
3 Jan 33
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir addl scenes
Asst dir
Asst dir addl scenes
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Asst cam
Asst cam
Photog addl scenes
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Unit mgr
Still photog
STAND INS
Double
Stand-in for Leslie Howard
Stand-in for Myrna Loy and Ann Harding
Stand-in
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Animal Kingdom by Philip Barry (New York, 12 Jan 1932).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 December 1932
Production Date:
1 October--25 November 1932
addl scenes 7 December 1932
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 December 1932
Copyright Number:
LP3643
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Photophone System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78, 85 or 90
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

On the night of his engagement party, Tom Collier, a Connecticut publisher, receives an ocean liner radiogram from Daisy Sage, his former lover and best friend, announcing her imminent arrival in New York. After Tom reassures his fiancée, Cecelia Henry, that his interest in Daisy, a commercial artist, is purely friendly, he leaves his party to break the news of his engagement to Daisy. Before Tom can share his news, however, Daisy confesses that, since learning how to paint in Paris, she has decided to pursue serious painting as a career and wants him to go to Mexico with her. Daisy also confesses her desire to marry and have a baby with Tom. Although startled by Daisy's sudden shift in attitude toward him, Tom tells her about his June wedding and insists that they continue their friendship. Devastated, Daisy refuses the friendship, and Tom returns to Connecticut to marry Cecelia. Months later, Tom sees a posted announcement about Daisy's first gallery showing in New York. Although Cecelia agrees to go with Tom to the show's opening, she feigns a headache just before their departure and, using an enticing dressing gown, subtly seduces Tom into staying home with her. Cecilia also persuades Tom to fire the rough-edged "Red" Regan, a washed-up boxer who now works as Tom's butler. To Tom's relief, Red, aware that Cecilia disapproves of him, announces that he has been offered another job and wants to quit. Soon after, a lonely and bored Tom visits Daisy in New York to rekindle their friendship. Although grateful for Tom's honest criticism of her paintings, a still enamored Daisy panics at the ... +


On the night of his engagement party, Tom Collier, a Connecticut publisher, receives an ocean liner radiogram from Daisy Sage, his former lover and best friend, announcing her imminent arrival in New York. After Tom reassures his fiancée, Cecelia Henry, that his interest in Daisy, a commercial artist, is purely friendly, he leaves his party to break the news of his engagement to Daisy. Before Tom can share his news, however, Daisy confesses that, since learning how to paint in Paris, she has decided to pursue serious painting as a career and wants him to go to Mexico with her. Daisy also confesses her desire to marry and have a baby with Tom. Although startled by Daisy's sudden shift in attitude toward him, Tom tells her about his June wedding and insists that they continue their friendship. Devastated, Daisy refuses the friendship, and Tom returns to Connecticut to marry Cecelia. Months later, Tom sees a posted announcement about Daisy's first gallery showing in New York. Although Cecelia agrees to go with Tom to the show's opening, she feigns a headache just before their departure and, using an enticing dressing gown, subtly seduces Tom into staying home with her. Cecilia also persuades Tom to fire the rough-edged "Red" Regan, a washed-up boxer who now works as Tom's butler. To Tom's relief, Red, aware that Cecilia disapproves of him, announces that he has been offered another job and wants to quit. Soon after, a lonely and bored Tom visits Daisy in New York to rekindle their friendship. Although grateful for Tom's honest criticism of her paintings, a still enamored Daisy panics at the thought of being with him and leaves suddenly for Nova Scotia. Later, however, Cecilia telephones Daisy and invites her and two of Tom's former New York friends, cellist Franc Schmidt and novelist Joe Fiske, to Tom's overnight birthday party. Curious about Cecilia, Daisy buries her feelings and accepts the invitation. At the party, Daisy criticizes Tom for turning his distinguished publishing company into a pulp fiction factory, a change precipitated by the greedy Cecilia. Daisy then sees Cecilia embracing Owen, her would-be lover and Tom's lawyer, whom Cecilia has persuaded to engineer a lucrative merger deal for Tom's publishing house. Disgusted, Daisy abruptly leaves the party and tells Tom that she feels only pity for him. After shutting Tom out of her bedroom as punishment for refusing to accept his domineering father's offer to move into the family house in New York, Cecilia then plans an intimate dinner for two. Over champagne, Cecilia continues her manipulations until Tom finally sees through her. At last fed up, Tom signs over to Cecilia a generous check that his father had given him as a birthday gift and announces to Red, who has since been rehired, that he is returning to his "wife" in New York. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.