One from the Heart (1982)

R | 101 mins | Musical | 11 February 1982

Full page view
HISTORY

The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Melissa Pope, a student at Oregon State Univeristy, with Jon Lewis as academic advisor.

When the film ends, a blue curtain closes across the screen and the following text appears: “Filmed entirely on the Stages of Zoetrope Studios.”
       The end credits contain the following acknowledgements: “Special Thanks to Mickey Hart; Bobby Vega.”
       A 26 Mar 1979 New West news item announced that Francis Coppola refused an offer from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) to direct One from the Heart for $2 million cash, a percentage of the film’s gross and a share of its total profits. New West noted that the deal represented one of the “largest fee(s) ever offered to a director” to date. Although MGM courted other directors at a lower rate after Coppola’s rejection, a 5 Dec 1979 Var news item reported that Coppola finally agreed to direct the picture for MGM. Jill Clayburgh and Michael Douglas were attached to the project in starring roles, but neither actor appears in the film.
       As stated in a 2 Feb 1981 NYT article, Armyan Bernstein’s original script was a romantic comedy set in Chicago, IL. MGM contracted Bernstein and Ed Feldman to produce, but Coppola resisted working as a studio employee and sought to purchase the rights to the film for his twelve year-old independent company, Zoetrope Studios. According to NYT, MGM agreed to the deal in exchange for distribution rights in the U.S. and Canada, as ...

More Less

The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Melissa Pope, a student at Oregon State Univeristy, with Jon Lewis as academic advisor.

When the film ends, a blue curtain closes across the screen and the following text appears: “Filmed entirely on the Stages of Zoetrope Studios.”
       The end credits contain the following acknowledgements: “Special Thanks to Mickey Hart; Bobby Vega.”
       A 26 Mar 1979 New West news item announced that Francis Coppola refused an offer from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) to direct One from the Heart for $2 million cash, a percentage of the film’s gross and a share of its total profits. New West noted that the deal represented one of the “largest fee(s) ever offered to a director” to date. Although MGM courted other directors at a lower rate after Coppola’s rejection, a 5 Dec 1979 Var news item reported that Coppola finally agreed to direct the picture for MGM. Jill Clayburgh and Michael Douglas were attached to the project in starring roles, but neither actor appears in the film.
       As stated in a 2 Feb 1981 NYT article, Armyan Bernstein’s original script was a romantic comedy set in Chicago, IL. MGM contracted Bernstein and Ed Feldman to produce, but Coppola resisted working as a studio employee and sought to purchase the rights to the film for his twelve year-old independent company, Zoetrope Studios. According to NYT, MGM agreed to the deal in exchange for distribution rights in the U.S. and Canada, as well as twenty percent of the film’s equity. Although MGM accepted responsibility for the picture’s completion funds, Zoetrope was accountable for financing the production, which Coppola planned to film at his studio’s newly acquired sound stages at the former General Service Studio at 1040 North Las Palmas in Hollywood, CA. $8 million of the film’s $15 million budget was backed by Chase Manhattan Bank and the remaining $7 was secured by presales to foreign distribution companies.
       However, Coppola’s decision to make the film a musical fantasy instead of a romantic comedy increased the budget by another $8 million, including $4.5 million for an “animated background” and $500,000 for a miniature recreation of Fremont Avenue in Las Vegas, NV, and “foreign tax-shelter investors” withdrew from the project two weeks before production began on 3 Feb 1981. Coppola told NYT that the investors were “burnt out from Superman II ” (1981, see entry) and upset that “MGM refused to make a minor monetary accommodation.” NYT reported that Zoetrope was having difficulty meeting payroll and, unbeknownst to Coppola, its executives accepted a fifteen percent reduction in their salaries to keep the studio afloat. Coppola explained that the company’s assets were linked to “nonliquid” resources, such as real estate and equipment, and although he expected MGM to help “on a short-term basis,” the studio was unwilling to lend its support to Zoetrope when the tax-sheltered investors dropped out.
       After failing to garner the support of United Artists, which was releasing the film for MGM, Coppola was urged by his colleagues to declare bankruptcy and make the film “under the protection of the state,” but Coppola, who risked his personal wealth and $30 million in debt to make Apocalypse Now (1979, see entry) was not afraid do the same for One from the Heart. Noting that he once gambled $1000 in Las Vegas to buy a $20,000 camera and lost, Coppola said his precarious approach to financing films posed a threat to the major Hollywood Studios which, he said, “laugh at me” while fearing his competition. Coppola claimed that the expense of recreating the Las Vegas strip at Zoetrope was justified because the film was “not about the real Las Vegas” but rather “a metaphor,” and he argued that the excess budget was a consequence of studio fees and salaries, not the set and special effects. NYT reported that the actors rehearsed for six weeks before principal photography and Coppola planned the shooting schedule for one month, instead of two months, to reduce costs.
       As reported in various contemporary sources, including HR on 5 Feb 1981 and LAT on 6 Feb 1981, Coppola held a press conference at Zoetrope on 4 Feb 1981, one day after shooting began, to announce his use of innovative techniques on the production which he termed “electronic cinema.” A 20 Jul 1981 Film Journal news item reported Coppola’s “entirely new concept in film production” allowed the studio to save money on film stock by shooting scenes on videotape first, editing them, and then capturing the final cut on film. Describing the set, LAT depicted an “on-the-spot editing center,” video streaming through monitors in real time and storyboard sketches screened on videodisc, layered with dialogue and soundtrack. Coppola stated in the press conference that there was no longer a need for “post” in “post-production” because in an “electronic studio… you have everything on hand, image and sound, and can instantly reorganize things in the patterns you want.” He added that his innovations marked the beginning of a “communications revolution.”
       Despite its technological advances, the film continued to provoke financial problems for Zoetrope. LAT and the 5 Feb1981 HR article noted that the studio’s story department closed and more layoffs were pending. Coppola had committed to funding the project with $1 million per week from his personal assets for eight weeks of shooting, reflecting a schedule of two months rather than the shortened, one-month plan he had previously arranged. LAT stated that the director found free labor at Bancroft High School, which was located near the studio, and thirty student interns worked on the production three days a week. Although Coppola complained that banks and Hollywood studios were interfering with his efforts, he intended to accelerate production so it would be ready for a 4 Jul 1981 release.
       As reported in a 6 Feb 1981 DV article, just days after Coppola’s press conference, Zoetrope president Bob Spiotta announced that the studio was unable to meet its payroll. However, Zoetrope’s staff of over five hundred personnel “voted unanimously” to continue working on the film without compensation “as long as proves necessary.” Although union leaders were willing to support the employees’ decision for a short time, Coppola was pressured to find new sources of financial support.
       During the third week of production, a 21 Feb 1981 NYT news item reported that Coppola received an anonymous gift “in the hundreds of thousands” of dollars, enough to keep the production running for another week. NYT noted that Coppola had recently guaranteed $1 million of his own assets from properties in San Francisco, CA, and used it as collateral to secure a loan from Chase Manhattan. Paramount Pictures agreed to invest $500,000 in “an upcoming” Zoetrope production while giving the same amount to Coppola as a “personal loan.” A 12 Jan 1982 NYT article stated that the property Paramount purchased from Zoetrope was titled Interface.
       An undated 1981 LAHExam article, written in the fifth week of production, reported that the Zoetrope staff, whose wages had been restored to half their regular rates, would be paid full salaries again due to an $8 million loan to Coppola from Canadian businessman, Jack Singer. According to LAHExam, Coppola had depleted his “negotiable assets.” Although the anonymous gift, reportedly $500,000, and the funding from Paramount, kept the production active for several weeks, Zoetrope was again threatened with bankruptcy. Singer, who wanted to initiate a career as a film producer and set up the company Jack Singer Productions for the picture, is not credited or acknowledged in the film. As noted in LAHExam, Singer negotiated for a return on his investment, including interest, as well as a share of the picture’s profits. According to a 1 Jan 1982 LAT article, Coppola agreed to use the Zoetrope property at General Studios as collateral for $3 million of the Singer’s loan, and Singer retained $5 million until viewing the film upon its completion. Although a 20 Apr 1981 Var news item announced that principal photography ended 16 Apr 1981, the picture was not finished until the second week of Jan 1982, according to LAT, and Singer refused to pay the remaining $5 million after viewing the film.
       According to a 3 Jun 1990 LAT article, One from the Heart also left Coppola $30 million in debt to Chase Manhattan, which ultimately funded the completion of the film, but the obligation was settled in 1983. However, Zoetrope went bankrupt after the $25 million film grossed under $10 million, including sales to foreign markets and video and cable rentals. Further contributing to Zoetrope’s bankruptcy, LAT reported, Singer manipulated the sale of the studio’s property. When the studio was listed in a foreclosure sale, Singer prevented “a higher offer” from another party “by threatening legal action that might have blocked the bid” due to his loan agreement with Coppola that held the studio as collateral. Singer then purchased the studio for a lower bid of $12.3 million, giving Zoetrope just enough money to pay off the building’s mortgage but leaving it with no assets. Singer renamed the Zoetrope campus Hollywood Center Studios.
       A 26 Jul 1990 LAT article reported that Coppola settled a long-term legal dispute with Singer, who claimed he was never compensated for his $3 loan. When Singer filed a legal petition to include Zoetrope Corp. as payment for the debt, Coppola agreed to pay Singer $8 million in cash over two years, which included interest on the original loan. Coppola was nearing completion on The Godfather, Part III (1990, see entry) and feared that Singer’s action would jeopardize the production.
       On 3 Jul 1981, LAT reported that Paramount sent a videotape of Coppola, explaining the picture and its “electronic cinema,” to exhibitors in lieu of a standard “bid letter.” Zoetrope marketing executive Max Bercutt stated that “we wanted to make it big, after all, this is a big picture,” but after a San Francisco screening, many theater owners refused to book the film based on its negative reception, as reported in a 22 Aug 1981 LAT article. Although Bercutt argued that the film was incomplete, without final sound effects and color enhancements, and should never have been screened, the exhibitors complained about the story, directing and acting. According to LAT, Coppola was still shooting “pick-up” footage in Jul 1981, making it impossible to complete the picture in time for the screening. The film’s release was rescheduled from its projected 9 Oct 1981 date, but Paramount announced that the film would be screened at the end of 1981 for Academy Award consideration.
       A 7 Jan 1982 DV news item reported that Coppola booked the film for two public previews at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, NY, on 15 Jan 1982, a month before its general release. Without authorization from Paramount, Coppola published a full-page advertisement in the NYT promoting the preview and exhibitors complained that the screenings would dilute “audience potential and market momentum.” On 11 Jan 1982, DV announced Paramount’s decision to veto its scheduled 10 Feb 1982 release of the film, even though it had already been booked at theatres nationwide. In response, Coppola announced the “termination” of Zoetrope’s relationship with Paramount at a press conference on 15 Jan 1982, the evening of the sold-out, generally well-received Radio City Music Hall screenings, according to an 18 Jan 1982 DV article. Coppola claimed that Paramount violated their contract by refusing to pay $1.6 million in completion funds which, as stated in DV, were due to the director’s “twenty-five days of eleventh hour reshooting.” However, Paramount was also angling to end their relationship with Zoetrope based on contractual violations, including the excessive shooting schedule and Coppola’s arrangement of the Music Hall previews. Coppola stated that the screenings were provoked by Paramount’s failure to finance his final work on the film. As he “no longer had the funds to complete the picture,” he hoped the previews attendance would provide “collateral so the various people I’m involved with financially will allow me to go on.”
       A 12 Jan 1982 NYT article, which estimated the completion funds at over $2 million, stated that Paramount’s negotiations with Zoetrope included only the funding of prints and advertising. The relationship between the two studios reportedly soured after the poorly received San Francisco screening, which both parties saw as an embarrassment. Coppola blamed the event on Paramount, even though the studio only had access to the prints through Zoetrope. Furthermore, Coppola contested that Paramount prevented the film’s qualification for Academy Awards by cancelling scheduled previews in Dec 1981, suggesting that the studio did not want the picture, in which they had “no financial stake,” to pose competition with their other releases, Reds (1981, see entry) and Ragtime (1981, see entry). Paramount responded that their decision was based on marketing strategy, noting that screening the film in December would jeopardize the success of the February release.
       On 29 Jan 1982, LAHExam announced that Zoetrope would distribute the picture itself. According to Zoetrope, various major studios, including Warner Bros. and Embassy Pictures, made “generous offers,” but Zoetrope declined and hired producer Irwin Yablans to head their new distribution wing, which was formed for the purpose of releasing One from the Heart. A 30 Jan 1982 LAT article stated that Yablans agreed to work without pay and noted that Zoetrope’s negotiations with Warner Bros. and Embassy failed because Coppola demanded a lowered distribution fee and a sizeable advance payment, as well as maintenance of “all other rights to the film” such as video and cable sales. The film was set for an 11 Feb 1982 release date in eight cities, including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Denver, San Francisco, Toronto, Seattle and Las Vegas. However, Zoetrope still hoped a deal would materialize with a major studio and in the first week of Feb 1982, Coppola announced that Columbia Pictures would distribute the picture, as reported in a 3 Feb 1982 LAT article.
       Although the picture opened on 11 Feb 1982, Columbia was discouraged by the box office receipts, which failed to surpass $1 million after one month, and decided to delay the film’s wide release which was scheduled for 12 Mar 1982, according to a 17 Mar 1982 HR news item. Columbia was reportedly testing “a new creative approach” to marketing the film.
       A 14 Nov 2003 DV news item announced that a re-release of One from the Heart would mark the first picture distributed by American Zoetrope, which had remained a production company until that time. The film opened that day at New York City’s Sunshine Cinema and was booked in twenty-five other theaters nationwide. DV noted that twenty-eight minutes of the original film had been changed and that it was re-mastered with Dolby Digital 5.1 sound. As stated in LAT, Coppola cancelled screenings of the picture not long after its 1982 release, believing that its “reception had been tainted by studio politics and media chatter.”
       Despite mixed, fairly positive reviews, the film was “considered a fiasco,” as noted by production designer Dean Tavoularis in a 9 Nov 2003 NYT news item. Tavoularis said that he was “blackballed by Hollywood” for his work on the picture.
       A 20 Jan 1982 Var review, which commends the film’s cinematography, noted Coppola’s claim that Vittorio Storaro deserved to be credited as director of photography. According to Var, union policy prevented Storaro from being billed in that capacity because he was foreign. The picture was shot with the Academy Aperture 1:37 image ratio, which had been largely abandoned by American producers after 1954.
       One from the Heart was nominated for one Academy Award in 1982 in the category of Music (Original Song Score and Adaptation Score) for Tom Waits.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
22 Jan 1981.
---
Daily Variety
6 Feb 1981
p. 1, 44.
Daily Variety
7 Jan 1982
p. 1, 47.
Daily Variety
11 Jan 1982.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jan 1982
p. 1, 3, 51.
Daily Variety
13 Aug 1990.
---
Daily Variety
14 Nov 2003.
---
Film Journal
20 Jul 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Feb 1981
p. 1, 4.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jan 1982
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 1982
p. 1, 41.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Mar 1982.
---
LAHExam
1981.
---
LAHExam
21 Feb 1981
p. 1, 4.
LAHExam
29 Jan 1982.
---
Los Angeles Times
6 Feb 1981
Section H, p. 1, 13.
Los Angeles Times
8 Mar 1981.
---
Los Angeles Times
3 Jul 1981
Section F, p. 1, 6-7.
Los Angeles Times
22 Aug 1981
Section C, p. 3, 7.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jan 1982
Section VI, p. 1, 6.
Los Angeles Times
3 Feb 1982
Section VI, p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
22 Jan 1982
Section G, p. 1, 6.
Los Angeles Times
30 Jan 1982.
---
Los Angeles Times
3 Jun 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
26 Jul 1990.
---
New West
26 Mar 1979.
---
New York Times
2 Feb 1981
Section C, p. 13.
New York Times
21 Feb 1981
p. 2, 47.
New York Times
12 Jan 1982
Section C, p. 11.
New York Times
17 Jan 1982
p. 56.
New York Times
3 Jun 1990.
---
New York Times
26 Jul 1990.
---
New York Times
9 Nov 2003.
---
Variety
5 Dec 1979.
---
Variety
20 Apr 1981.
---
Variety
26 Aug 1981.
---
Variety
20 Jan 1982
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Francis Coppola
Dir
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Francis Coppola
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Steadicam® op
Snorkel cam
Addl cam op
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam dept supv
Key grip
Grip best boy
Gaffer
Best boy
Still photog
Still photog
Filmed in
Zoetrope film/video transition
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Illustrator
Graphic des
Prod illustrator
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
With, Ed
With, Ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Set artist
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
Songs & mus
Sung by
Sung by
Mus prod
Orch and addl mus scoring
SOUND
Sd des
James Webb
Prod rec
Prod rec
Prod rec
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff
Process coord
Visual eff ed
Miniature and visual eff photog
Miniature supv
Motion control photog
Motion control photog
Motion control photog
Motion control photog
Motion control photog
Miniature electronics maintenance
Matte artist
Spec eff coord
Addl visual eff
Addl visual eff
Addl visual eff
Title des
Titles
Motion control photog and matte paintings by
Opticals
DANCE
Choreog
Asst
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Spec thanks to
Spec thanks to
Zoetrope casting
Zoetrope extra casting
Zoetrope extra casting
Spec asst to the dir
Spec asst to the dir
Scr supv
Dial dir
Electronic cinema
Electronic cinema
Electronic cinema
Electronic cinema
In cooperation with
Electronic cinema
Prod coord
Prod auditor
Prod auditor
Transportation coord
Prod representative
Prod asst
Prod asst
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
With the participation of
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Supv col tech
Supv col tech
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 February 1982
Premiere Information:
San Francisco premiere: week of 17 Aug 1981; New York premiere: 15 Jan 1982; Los Angeles and New York openings: 11 Feb 1982
Production Date:
3 Feb--3 Apr 1981 in Los Angeles
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Zoetrope Studios
24 June 1982
PA141967
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo in selected theatres
Color
Processed by Technicolor®
Lenses/Prints
Filmed in Technovision
Duration(in mins):
101
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26579
SYNOPSIS

On the Fremont Avenue strip of casinos in Las Vegas, Nevada, Frannie completes her work for the day as a travel agency window dresser and returns home, spilling groceries on the front lawn. Frannie’s boyfriend, Hank, arrives and picks up after her before they greet each other in bed. In celebration of their anniversary, which is the following day, on the Fourth of July, the couple exchanges gifts. Frannie gives Hank plane tickets for a romantic getaway to Bora Bora, and Hank presents her with the deed to the house in which they live, but Frannie complains the house is a “fixer-upper” and Hank says they can’t afford a vacation. Later, Frannie gets ready to go out while Hank prepares a meal in the kitchen. After agreeing to never fight again, the couple makes love. However, at dinner, Frannie is upset that Hank bought a house without asking her. Hank is unenthusiastic about Bora Bora and argues that he knows better how to spend their money. A fight ensues and Frannie walks out, claiming their relationship is over. Frannie admits that she kissed Hank’s best friend, Moe, at a New Year’s Eve party and Hank confesses to an affair with a woman he met at the same event. Despite Hank’s protests, Frannie drives away. Sometime later, Hank interrogates Moe about kissing Frannie, but Moe retorts that Hank once slept with his girlfriend. As the friends apologize to each other, Hank tells Moe that he is suffering from his separation with Frannie. Meanwhile, Frannie’s friend, Maggie, assures her that the relationship is worth saving, but Frannie says ...

More Less

On the Fremont Avenue strip of casinos in Las Vegas, Nevada, Frannie completes her work for the day as a travel agency window dresser and returns home, spilling groceries on the front lawn. Frannie’s boyfriend, Hank, arrives and picks up after her before they greet each other in bed. In celebration of their anniversary, which is the following day, on the Fourth of July, the couple exchanges gifts. Frannie gives Hank plane tickets for a romantic getaway to Bora Bora, and Hank presents her with the deed to the house in which they live, but Frannie complains the house is a “fixer-upper” and Hank says they can’t afford a vacation. Later, Frannie gets ready to go out while Hank prepares a meal in the kitchen. After agreeing to never fight again, the couple makes love. However, at dinner, Frannie is upset that Hank bought a house without asking her. Hank is unenthusiastic about Bora Bora and argues that he knows better how to spend their money. A fight ensues and Frannie walks out, claiming their relationship is over. Frannie admits that she kissed Hank’s best friend, Moe, at a New Year’s Eve party and Hank confesses to an affair with a woman he met at the same event. Despite Hank’s protests, Frannie drives away. Sometime later, Hank interrogates Moe about kissing Frannie, but Moe retorts that Hank once slept with his girlfriend. As the friends apologize to each other, Hank tells Moe that he is suffering from his separation with Frannie. Meanwhile, Frannie’s friend, Maggie, assures her that the relationship is worth saving, but Frannie says she wants nothing less than “paradise.” Later, Frannie and Hank unsuccessfully try to call each other. At a junkyard of neon signs, Frank misses Frannie and she, too, finds it difficult to concentrate back at the travel agency, where she decorates a window as Bora Bora. A stranger in a tuxedo named Ray tells Frannie that he has been to the island many times and she has not accurately captured the color of the sky. Confessing that he has admired Frannie from afar, Ray invites her to his piano performance at a club that evening and gives her a matchbook with the address. As Frannie walks away with Maggie, they unknowingly cross paths with Moe and Hank, who catch the eye of a beautiful circus performer named Leila. When Leila storms away from her trainers, Hank lights her cigarette and she asks him to meet her at the Fremont Casino that night. Frannie and Hank simultaneously prepare for their separate dates. Returning home, Frannie is surprised to see Hank, who observes that she is dressed seductively. When Hank inquires where she is going, Frannie says: “Paradise.” Although Hank tries to kiss her, Frannie packs a suitcase and reiterates that their relationship has ended. Walking along the downtown strip, Frannie accidentally gives Ray’s matchbook to a passerby who asks for a light, and when she tries to get it back, she nearly crosses paths with Hank. Discouraged, Frannie goes to a restaurant, but soon sees Ray, who explains that he is a waiter when he is not performing. After giving Frannie another customer’s club sandwich, Ray is fired and the couple goes to a vacant ballroom. Playing piano, Ray tells Frannie that he wishes to be Humphrey Bogart in the film Casablanca because he owned a fancy club and chose freedom over the love of a woman. As Ray sings, Frannie leads him onto the dance floor for a tango and they dance through the Las Vegas strip with a crowd of July fourth revelers. Meanwhile, Hank waits for Leila, who arrives late. As they make their way through the crowd, they encounter Frannie and Ray, but the couples head in opposite directions. Despite Ray’s pleas, Frannie refuses to go home with him for the night, then changes her mind. Hank takes Leila to the junkyard, which she calls the “Garden of the Taj Mahal,” and as she walks a tight rope, Hank conducts an imaginary orchestra of junked cars. At their different locations, the two couples make love. In the morning, Hank imagines that Frannie has been with another man and frantically tries to call her. Meanwhile, Ray suggests he and Frannie go to Bora Bora and she agrees. Leila realizes Hank is still in love with Frannie, but she asks him to run away with her. As Moe drives the couple to Maggie’s home in search of Frannie, Leila tells Hank that circus girls can disappear in the blink of an eye, and when they arrive at the apartment, she does just that. Hank forces his way through Maggie’s door to discover that Frannie slept elsewhere and loses his breath. When Maggie tells Hank about Ray, he rushes to Ray’s apartment, proclaiming his love for Frannie. Climbing onto the roof, Hank falls through Ray’s ceiling and finds the couple in bed. A fight ensues. Although Frannie protests, Hank carries her away in her underwear and drives home, where she says that she prefers Ray because he sings to her. Walking away, Frannie ends the relationship once and for all. Later, Frannie and Ray go to the airport on their way to Bora Bora, but Hank pursues them. As Ray and Frannie board the plane, Hank begs her not to leave and sings “You Are My Sunshine” out of tune. However, Frannie gets on the plane with Ray. Outside, in the pouring rain, Hank watches her plane take off. When Hank returns home, he collects Frannie’s clothes and puts them in the fireplace, crying. Unable to light the match, Hank sees Frannie walk through the door, and they embrace passionately.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.