Flight (2012)

R | 138 mins | Drama | 2012

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HISTORY

All credits appear at the end of the film. End credits include the following acknowledgement: “In Memory of Ed Limato, 1936-2010.” Also in the end credits, producers thank the following organizations: Braves Productions, Inc.; WXIA/WATL-TV, Atlanta; and CNN. Appearing after the “thanks” is the written statement: “Paramount Pictures Corporation did not receive any payment or other consideration, or enter into any agreement, for the depiction of tobacco products in this film.” As mentioned in end credits, the film was made “with the participation of” the Georgia Film, Music & Digital Entertainment Office, a division of the Georgia Department of Economic Development.
       According to production notes from AMPAS library files, screenwriter John Gatins first conceived of Flight in 1999 when he was working as a technical advisor on a military-themed film. Gatins was inspired by his fellow advisors, naval pilots, who told stories about landing airplanes in harsh conditions on aircraft carriers. A 19 Dec 2012 DV brief reported that, in 2006, producers Laurie MacDonald and Walter Parkes became interested in the project after reading Gatin’s first forty pages, and, after eighteen months of development, the first draft of the screenplay was completed in 2007. As stated in a 3 Nov 2012 LAT article, Gatins, who quit drinking and doing drugs in 1993, drew heavily on his own experience as a former addict to create the character of “Whip Whitaker.” Furthermore, in order to convey a realistic crash sequence, the writer conducted extensive research and took details directly from a real-life account involving an airplane with a snapped tail that was forced to invert before a crash landing.
       In 2009, Denzel Washington read the ... More Less

All credits appear at the end of the film. End credits include the following acknowledgement: “In Memory of Ed Limato, 1936-2010.” Also in the end credits, producers thank the following organizations: Braves Productions, Inc.; WXIA/WATL-TV, Atlanta; and CNN. Appearing after the “thanks” is the written statement: “Paramount Pictures Corporation did not receive any payment or other consideration, or enter into any agreement, for the depiction of tobacco products in this film.” As mentioned in end credits, the film was made “with the participation of” the Georgia Film, Music & Digital Entertainment Office, a division of the Georgia Department of Economic Development.
       According to production notes from AMPAS library files, screenwriter John Gatins first conceived of Flight in 1999 when he was working as a technical advisor on a military-themed film. Gatins was inspired by his fellow advisors, naval pilots, who told stories about landing airplanes in harsh conditions on aircraft carriers. A 19 Dec 2012 DV brief reported that, in 2006, producers Laurie MacDonald and Walter Parkes became interested in the project after reading Gatin’s first forty pages, and, after eighteen months of development, the first draft of the screenplay was completed in 2007. As stated in a 3 Nov 2012 LAT article, Gatins, who quit drinking and doing drugs in 1993, drew heavily on his own experience as a former addict to create the character of “Whip Whitaker.” Furthermore, in order to convey a realistic crash sequence, the writer conducted extensive research and took details directly from a real-life account involving an airplane with a snapped tail that was forced to invert before a crash landing.
       In 2009, Denzel Washington read the script and agreed to play Whip, and Robert Zemeckis came on board to direct in Apr 2011, as reported in a 21 Apr 2011 HR news item. According to a 21 Oct 2012 LAT article, Flight marked Zemeckis’s return to live-action filmmaking after 2000’s Cast Away (see entry). Along with Washington, Zemeckis, who was an avid pilot himself with 1,600 hours of flying experience, waived his usual “multi-million dollar fee” to accommodate the $31 million production budget.
       As stated in production notes, principal photography began 12 Oct 2011 in Atlanta, GA. The story was shot sequentially over forty-eight days, and, as per Zemeckis’s request, Gatins was on set during production to advise and make changes as “revelations occurred.”
       The airplane shown in the film was constructed at EUE/Screen Gems in Atlanta. A custom jet was built on Stage 5 based on plans by production designer Nelson Coates, who combined elements from Boeing 737 and McDonnell Douglas MD-80 aircraft. To simulate turbulence, the jet was placed on air mattresses rigged with three-foot springs; and, for the sequence in which the airplane inverts, a “rotisserie rig” was assembled that could rotate separate sections of the jet that weighed 11,500 pounds. Footage from the two sections that were turned upside down, each fourteen-rows in length, was combined to give the appearance of the entire plane inverting at once. To portray the airplane’s passengers throughout the crash sequence, stunt performers were cast, although Zemeckis was adamant that the crash victims look like ordinary people. The stunt players were sometimes inverted “for up to two minutes per take,” numerous times per day, held in place by seat belts that a safety advisor deemed capable of securing them for up to a minute each time.
       According to production notes, locations included Green Valley Farms in Covington, GA, where the airplane crash-landed. In the same field, a Pentecostal church was erected by the crew, forty-seven-feet-high with a steeple to be broken off during the crash sequence. Whip’s family home was shot at a 250-acre farm, Hall’s Flying Ranch, outside Hampton, GA, and Atlanta’s St. Joseph’s Hospital served as the filming site for hospital scenes involving Whip and “Nicole.”
       The camera used throughout production was a RED EPIC digital camera. Because of its small size, the RED was perfect for shooting within the cramped cabin of the airplane. Additionally, three RED cameras were mounted on a helicopter for aerial footage that was pieced together and used to approximate the view outside the plane’s windscreen. For sequences in which Whip and other characters were inebriated, a Steadicam was utilized to give a floating appearance that mirrored the characters’ state of mind.
       A 7 Nov 2012 LAT article reported that Anheuser-Busch was unhappy with the film’s portrayal of their product, Budweiser beer, in association with Whip’s disordered drinking. Having received no advance warning that Budweiser would appear in the picture, Anheuser-Busch asked distributor Paramount Pictures to blur Budweiser labels from home video, television, and streaming versions of Flight, but LAT noted that Paramount had declined to comment on the issue. The article also suggested the matter was unlikely to go to court, as “the courts have typically sided with the creative community when it comes to featuring real products in movies and television shows.”
       A 10 Aug 2012 LAT item announced that Flight would make its world premiere 14 Oct 2012, as the New York Film Festival’s closing-night film. In its opening weekend two weeks later, the film grossed $25 million domestically, according to the 7 Nov 2012 LAT.
       Critical reception was largely positive with frequent praise going to the harrowing plane crash sequence, described as “freakshisly real” by Manohla Dargis in her 2 Nov 2012 NYT review. Washington’s performance was also highly lauded, and the 26 Oct 2012 HR review deemed the character of Whip “one of his meatiest, most complex roles.”
       Flight received the following Academy Award nominations: Best Actor (Denzel Washington), and Best Original Screenplay. The film also received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama (Denzel Washington).
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Oct 2012
p. 7.
Daily Variety
5 Dec 2012.
---
Daily Variety
19 Dec 2012.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Apr 2011.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Oct 2012
p. 58.
Los Angeles Times
10 Aug 2012
Section D, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
21 Oct 2012
Section D, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
1 Nov 2012.
---
Los Angeles Times
3 Nov 2012
Section D, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
7 Nov 2012
Section D, p. 5.
New York Times
2 Nov 2012
Section C, p. 1.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Voice performers:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures Presents
An ImageMovers Production
A Parkes + MacDonald Image Nation Production
A Robert Zemeckis Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
A cam/Steadicam op
1st asst photog
2d asst photog
B cam op
B 1st asst photog
B 2d asst photog
Digital imaging tech
Digital imaging tech
Aerial dir of photog
Lead video assist
Video asst
Video playback
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Chief rigging tech
Asst chief rigging elec
Dimmer op
Dimmer op
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
1st company grip
2d company grip
1st company rigging grip
2d company rigging grip
A dolly grip op
B dolly grip op
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Stills photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
Addl ed
Assoc ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Lead set des
Set des
Lead person
Set dec buyer
On set dresser
Foreperson
Foreperson
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop asst
Addl prop asst
Const coord
Const foreperson
Shop foreperson
Propmaker foreperson
Propmaker foreperson
Propmaker foreperson
Propmaker foreperson
Propmaker foreperson
Propmaker foreperson
Const buyer
Paint supv
Paint foreperson
Paint foreperson
Paint foreperson
On-set painter
Greens foreperson
Greens
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Key cost
Cost to Mr. Washington
Set cost
Set cost
Addl cost
Shopper
Shopper
Ager/Dyer
Tailor
MUSIC
Mus/Orch
Supv mus ed
Mus rec
Mus mixed
Scoring coord
Scoring prod asst
Mus contractor
Mus contractor
Mus preparation
Mus preparation
SOUND
Sd des/Re-rec mixer
Boom op
Cable person
Post prod sd services by
A Lucasfilm Ltd. Company, Marin County, California
Supv sd ed/Re-rec mixer, Skywalker Sound
Re-rec mixer, Skywalker Sound
Addl re-rec mixer, Skywalker Sound
Addl re-rec mixer, Skywalker Sound
Dial/ADR supv, Skywalker Sound
Dial ed, Skywalker Sound
Dial ed, Skywalker Sound
ADR ed, Skywalker Sound
Sd eff ed, Skywalker Sound
Asst supv sd ed, Skywalker Sound
Asst dial ed, Skywalker Sound
Sd eff rec, Skywalker Sound
Sd des intern, Skywalker Sound
Asst re-rec mixer, Skywalker Sound
ADR mixer, Skywalker Sound
ADR rec, Skywalker Sound
Loop grop
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley mixer
Foley rec
Foley rec
Foley asst
Digital transfer
Digital transfer
Video services
Video services
Eng services
Eng services
Digital ed services
Digital ed services
Digital ed services
Client services
Client services
Accountant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreperson
Shop foreperson
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Motion base control op
Motion base op
Motion base tech
Visual eff by
Digital art dir, Atomic Fiction
Compositing supv, Atomic Fiction
Visual eff prod, Atomic Fiction
Visual eff assoc prod, Atomic Fiction
Digital prod mgr, Atomic Fiction
Visual eff coord, Atomic Fiction
Computer graphics supv, Atomic Fiction
Anim supv, Atomic Fiction
Anim, Atomic Fiction
Anim, Atomic Fiction
Digital artist, Atomic Fiction
Digital artist, Atomic Fiction
Digital artist, Atomic Fiction
Digital artist, Atomic Fiction
Digital artist, Atomic Fiction
Digital artist, Atomic Fiction
Digital artist, Atomic Fiction
Matte painter, Atomic Fiction
Matte painter, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Digital compositor, Atomic Fiction
Lead developer, Atomic Fiction
Visual eff ed, Atomic Fiction
Visual eff ed, Atomic Fiction
Prod asst, Atomic Fiction
Prod asst, Atomic Fiction
Systems eng, Atomic Fiction
Systems eng, Atomic Fiction
End titles
End titles, Scarlet Letters
MAKEUP
Makeup dept head
Key makeup artist
Makeup artist to Mr. Washington
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hair dept head
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist to Mr. Washington
Addl hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Helicopter pilot
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod supv
Prod supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Prod secy
Prod secy
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Loc casting
Background casting
Background casting asst
Unit pub
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
2d asst accountant
2d asst accountant
Payroll accountant
Accounting clerk
Accounting clerk
Asst to Mr. Zemeckis
Asst to Mr. Zemeckis
Asst to Mr. Zemeckis
Asst to Mr. Parkes
Asst to Ms. MacDonald
Asst to Mr. Starkey
Asst to Mr. Starkey
Asst to Mr. Rapke
Asst to Mr. Rapke
Asst to Ms. Martin
Exec asst to Mr. Washington
Security to Mr. Washington
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
NTSB investigation consultant
Addiction consultant
Studio teacher
Transportation coord
Los Angeles transportation capt
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation dispatcher
Picture car coord
Picture car mechanic
Picture car mechanic
Aviation adv
Flight trainer
Flight attendant trainer
Medic
Medic
Craft service
Commercial airline mockups provided by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Digital intermediate provided by
DI prod
DI finishing artist
DI management
DI management
DI management
Dailies provided by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Alcohol," written by Stephen Duffy & Steven Page, performed by Barenaked Ladies, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
"Feelin' Alright," written by Dave Mason, performed by Joe Cocker, courtesy of A&M Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises and Straight Ahead Productions Ltd.
"Under the Bridge," written by Flea, John Fruscianti, Anthony Kiedis & Chad Smith, performed by Red Hot Chili Peppers, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
+
SONGS
"Alcohol," written by Stephen Duffy & Steven Page, performed by Barenaked Ladies, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
"Feelin' Alright," written by Dave Mason, performed by Joe Cocker, courtesy of A&M Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises and Straight Ahead Productions Ltd.
"Under the Bridge," written by Flea, John Fruscianti, Anthony Kiedis & Chad Smith, performed by Red Hot Chili Peppers, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
"Sweet Jane," written by Lou Reed, performed by Cowboy Junkies, courtesy of Sony Music Canada & RCA Records Label, by arrangement with SONY Music Licensing
"Sympathy for the Devil," written by Mick Jagger & Keith Richards, performed by The Rolling Stones, courtesy of ABKCO Music and Records, Inc.
"Gimme Shelter," written by Mick Jagger & Keith Richards, performed by The Rolling Stones, courtesy of ABKCO Music and Records, Inc.
"Ain't No Sunshine," written & performed by Bill Withers, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with SONY Music Licensing
"Never Get Out of These Blues Alive," written by John Lee Hooker, performed by John Lee Hooker featuring Van Morrison, John Lee Hooker courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises, Van Morrison courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
"What's Going On," written by Renaldo Benson, Alfred Cleveland & Marvin Gaye, performed by Marvin Gaye, courtesy of Motown Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Going Down," written by Don Nix, performed by Jeff Beck Group, courtesy of Epic Records, by arrangement with SONY Music Licensing
"With a Little Help from My Friends," written by John Lennon & Paul McCartney
"Feelin' Alright," written by Dave Mason, performed by Traffic, courtesy of Island Records Ltd., under license from Universal Music Enterprises.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
2012
Premiere Information:
World premiere at New York Film Festival: 14 October 2012
Los Angeles and New York openings: 2 November 2012
Production Date:
began 12 October 2011 in Atlanta
Physical Properties:
Sound
Datasat Digital Sound in selected theatres; Dolby® Digital in selected theatres
Color
DeLuxe®
Duration(in mins):
138
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
47695
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Commercial airplane pilot Whip Whitaker and his girlfriend, stewardess Katerina Marquez, wake up in their hotel room in Orlando, Florida, after a night of boozing and drug taking. Whip receives a phone call from his ex-wife Deana and the two argue over sending their teenage son, Will "Knuckles," to a private school. He then takes a hit of marijuana and snorts a line of cocaine. An hour later, Whip boards his airplane at the airport and greets Katerina in a professional manner, to hide their personal relationship. Whip settles into his captain's chair for his flight to Atlanta, Georgia, and introduces himself to his new co-pilot, Ken Evans. Meanwhile, on the ground in Atlanta, Nicole, a drug addict and prostitute, leaves a seedy motel room while counting the money given to her by her john. She then drives to a pornographic movie set to buy drugs from her friend Kip, who is acting in the sleazy production. Kip tries to convince Nicole to act in the film also, but she refuses. Regardless, Kip hands her a baggie of heroin gratis. Back at the airport, Whip takes off during a torrential rainstorm, but expertly guides the plane through the turbulence and is soon flying in clear skies above the clouds. Later during the flight, Whip soothes the passengers' rattled nerves over the intercom and secretly empties two small bottles of vodka into a bottle of orange juice. Meanwhile, at her apartment, Nicole overdoses after injecting heroin into her arm. Up in the air, a mechanical malfunction abruptly sends the plane into a nosedive. Whip orders Ken to dump the fuel tanks and to drop the wing flaps, which stops their ... +


Commercial airplane pilot Whip Whitaker and his girlfriend, stewardess Katerina Marquez, wake up in their hotel room in Orlando, Florida, after a night of boozing and drug taking. Whip receives a phone call from his ex-wife Deana and the two argue over sending their teenage son, Will "Knuckles," to a private school. He then takes a hit of marijuana and snorts a line of cocaine. An hour later, Whip boards his airplane at the airport and greets Katerina in a professional manner, to hide their personal relationship. Whip settles into his captain's chair for his flight to Atlanta, Georgia, and introduces himself to his new co-pilot, Ken Evans. Meanwhile, on the ground in Atlanta, Nicole, a drug addict and prostitute, leaves a seedy motel room while counting the money given to her by her john. She then drives to a pornographic movie set to buy drugs from her friend Kip, who is acting in the sleazy production. Kip tries to convince Nicole to act in the film also, but she refuses. Regardless, Kip hands her a baggie of heroin gratis. Back at the airport, Whip takes off during a torrential rainstorm, but expertly guides the plane through the turbulence and is soon flying in clear skies above the clouds. Later during the flight, Whip soothes the passengers' rattled nerves over the intercom and secretly empties two small bottles of vodka into a bottle of orange juice. Meanwhile, at her apartment, Nicole overdoses after injecting heroin into her arm. Up in the air, a mechanical malfunction abruptly sends the plane into a nosedive. Whip orders Ken to dump the fuel tanks and to drop the wing flaps, which stops their rapid descent – but only for a minute. As the plane rushes toward the ground again, Whip calmly orders Ken and stewardess Margaret Thomason to help him work the instruments to enact a complicated maneuver that rolls the plane upside-down, which steadies it out again. In the inverted passenger compartment, Katerina rescues a boy who has fallen out of his seat. Although she buckles the terrified kid back in safely, when Whip reverts the plane right side up, Katerina is brutally bounced around the cabin. Both engines burst into flames, but Whip is able to glide the plane to a rough emergency landing in an empty field. Knocked unconscious in the crash, Whip later wakes up in a hospital in south Atlanta with a concussion and other minor injuries. He is greeted by his friend, pilots' union representative Charlie Anderson, who tells him that out of 102 passengers and crewmembers on his flight only six people have died. A National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) official informs Whip that one of the dead is Katerina. The next day, Whip is visited by his friend Harling Mays, who hands Whip a carton of cigarettes and a bottle of vodka. Whip refuses the alcohol, swearing that he's never going to drink again. Later that night, Whip sneaks into a hospital stairwell to smoke. There, he startles Nicole, who is also smoking. Whip tells Nicole that he was on the plane, but lies that he was sitting somewhere in the back. However, an ill-looking cancer patient also enters the stairwell and recognizes Whip from the news. The gaunt young man deduces that Nicole is a junkie from the obvious track marks on her arms. Before the three part ways, Whip gets Nicole to tell him her address. When he's finally well enough, Whip drives out to his family's remote farm to escape nosy reporters. Once there, he gathers the alcohol and drugs stashed around the farmhouse and dumps it all down the drain. The next morning, Whip goes to a hotel breakfast buffet room to meet Charlie and Hugh Lang, a lawyer hired by the pilots' union. Hugh states that the NTSB took blood samples from Whip while he was in the hospital, so they know he had alcohol and cocaine in his system during the flight. Whip could go to prison for the rest of his life if the NTSB wants to hold Whip accountable for the six deaths. Hugh wants Whip to sign a release giving the lawyer permission to kill Whip's toxicology report. Instead of signing, though, Whip leaves the table and orders a glass of orange juice with a side of vodka at the hotel bar. He only drinks the vodka. Later, he buys a plastic jug of cheap vodka from a convenience store and chugs it in his car. Driving home, he visits Nicole at her apartment, where she's moving out, and breaks up a physical altercation between her and her landlord. Whip gives the landlord $400 for Nicole's unpaid rent. Whip then drives Nicole to his farmhouse where they spend an intimate night together. The next morning, Hugh drives Whip out to the crash site where they watch Ellen Block, the NTSB officer in charge of the investigation, checking out the wreckage. Whip promises Hugh that he'll stop drinking until the whole matter is finally resolved. Back at the farmhouse, Whip gets drunk and passes out while watching old home videos of his son and his father. The next day, Whip picks up Nicole from her new job as a supermarket cashier and she convinces him to attend an AA meeting. However, after staying at the meeting for only a few minutes, Whip leaves abruptly. Whip then visits Ken in the hospital where the co-pilot insists he knew that Whip was drunk during the flight, but hasn't told the NTSB investigators yet. Returning to the farmhouse after her AA meeting, Nicole argues with Whip about his drinking. The next morning, she quietly leaves him for good while he's still sleeping. Later, at a hangar where the damaged plane has been reconstructed, Whip learns from Charlie and Hugh that his toxicology report has been scrubbed from the official record of the incident. However, the NTSB found the two tiny vodka bottles that Whip emptied on the flight. Since the bottles cannot be tied directly to Whip, Hugh suggests that at the upcoming NTSB hearing Whip lie and say that Katerina drank them. Whip angrily refuses to make Katerina look bad, but Hugh insists that if Whip doesn't officially lie then he's going to jail for the rest of his life. In a distressed emotional state and half-drunk, Whip visits Deana and Will at their suburban home. After a brief argument, Deana threatens to call police. Will stands up to his father and successfully orders Whip to leave. However, right outside, a group of television reporters have gathered and confront Whip with a barrage of questions, which he politely declines to answer. To sober up for the hearing, Whip holes up in Charlie's house for a week. The night before the hearing, Charlie takes Whip to a fancy hotel. When Whip is left alone in the room, the first thing he does is check the mini-bar, which is filled only with soft drinks and no alcohol. Later that night, though, Whip discovers that the door to the adjoining room has been left ajar. The other room's mini-bar is fully stocked with alcoholic drinks. Whip removes a bottle of vodka. The next morning, Hugh and Charlie find Whip passed out in the bathroom after having drunk all the liquor from the mini-bar. In order to wake him up, they call Harling, who comes to the hotel room with an ample supply of cocaine. Whip snorts a few lines and is sufficiently perked up. At the NTSB hearing, Ellen Block praises Whip for his skillful maneuvers in safely landing the plane and reveals that a broken screw in the plane's stabilizer caused the nosedive. Then, at Ellen's prodding, Whip denies that he drank or did drugs prior to the flight. He also denies that he knew Katerina on an intimate level outside of work. Ellen then asks Whip if he thinks it was Katerina who consumed the vodka on the flight. Whip stalls, then announces that he himself drank the vodka because he's an alcoholic. A year later, Whip recounts his story to a group of inmates at the prison where he's been serving out his sentence. Will then visits his father in prison to interview him for a college essay to be entitled "The Most Fascinating Person I've Never Met." +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.