Silver Linings Playbook (2012)

R | 122 mins | Comedy, Romance | 16 November 2012

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HISTORY

The film commences with a logo for The Weinstein Company, followed by a title card establishing the setting: “Karel Psychiatric Facility, Baltimore.” All credits, beginning with director David O. Russell’s, appear at the end of the film.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “ A Farewell to Arms courtesy of Simon & Schuster; Singin’ in the Rain licensed by Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc.” and “Photos provided by Getty Images: Hemera Technologies; Brand X Pictures; Jupiter Images; Thinkstock; George Doyle; Media Images; Photodisc; Dick Luria.” Also in the end credits the producers thank the following individuals and organizations: Sydney Pollack; Anthony Minghella; Franklin Leonard; Lou Lombardi; Seth Berg; Wendy Christiansen; Allison O’Donnell; Jeff Rosen; Tiffany Steffens; Ridley Park Borough; Ridley Park Police Department; Ridley Township; Ridley Township Police Department; Greater Philadelphia Film Office – Sharon Pinkenson; Pennsylvania Film Office; Upper Darby Police Department; Upper Darby Township; Annheuser-Busch; Diageo; Ketel One; Pepsi; and Reebok. Following the special thanks is the written statement, “This project was made possible with the support of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Film Office.”
       As announced in a 1 Jun 2007 DV news brief, the Weinstein Company bought the film rights to Matthew Quick’s novel before it was set to be published in early 2009. At the time, Sydney Pollack and Anthony Minghella’s production company, Mirage Pictures, was on board to produce with Michelle Raimo Kouyate. Director David O. Russell’s involvement was announced in a 30 Mar 2009 HR item, which also stated that Russell would write the adaptation. According to a 3 Dec 2012 Time article, Russell’s interest stemmed partly from the fact ... More Less

The film commences with a logo for The Weinstein Company, followed by a title card establishing the setting: “Karel Psychiatric Facility, Baltimore.” All credits, beginning with director David O. Russell’s, appear at the end of the film.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “ A Farewell to Arms courtesy of Simon & Schuster; Singin’ in the Rain licensed by Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc.” and “Photos provided by Getty Images: Hemera Technologies; Brand X Pictures; Jupiter Images; Thinkstock; George Doyle; Media Images; Photodisc; Dick Luria.” Also in the end credits the producers thank the following individuals and organizations: Sydney Pollack; Anthony Minghella; Franklin Leonard; Lou Lombardi; Seth Berg; Wendy Christiansen; Allison O’Donnell; Jeff Rosen; Tiffany Steffens; Ridley Park Borough; Ridley Park Police Department; Ridley Township; Ridley Township Police Department; Greater Philadelphia Film Office – Sharon Pinkenson; Pennsylvania Film Office; Upper Darby Police Department; Upper Darby Township; Annheuser-Busch; Diageo; Ketel One; Pepsi; and Reebok. Following the special thanks is the written statement, “This project was made possible with the support of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Film Office.”
       As announced in a 1 Jun 2007 DV news brief, the Weinstein Company bought the film rights to Matthew Quick’s novel before it was set to be published in early 2009. At the time, Sydney Pollack and Anthony Minghella’s production company, Mirage Pictures, was on board to produce with Michelle Raimo Kouyate. Director David O. Russell’s involvement was announced in a 30 Mar 2009 HR item, which also stated that Russell would write the adaptation. According to a 3 Dec 2012 Time article, Russell’s interest stemmed partly from the fact that his son, Matthew, had special needs, and the character “Pat Solatano” reminded him of an older version of Matthew. He also mentioned that actor Robert De Niro had a similar situation in his family, and that they had shared stories over the years. In a 14 Sep 2012 HR article, Russell stated that he prepared for the film by visiting the institution that doubled as Karel Psychiatric Facility and spoke to several patients with bipolar disorder.
       A 14 Sep 2012 HR article stated that actor Mark Wahlberg was originally attached to play Pat, but his deal could not be negotiated for undisclosed reasons. As stated in Time, actor Bradley Cooper, who replaced Wahlberg, related to Pat as an Italian-American from Philadelphia, PA, and a longtime fan of the Philadelphia Eagles. Joining the cast after a five-year hiatus from motion pictures, Chris Tucker signed on to play the supporting character, “Danny,” according to a 6 Dec 2012 Rolling Stone article. Tucker had received a reported $25 million salary on his last film, Rush Hour 3 (2007, see entry), after which the Internal Revenue Service filed reports that Tucker “owed $11.5 million in back taxes” in 2010. Russell commented, in reference to Tucker’s status as a supporting player in Silver Linings Playbook, that “bringing that kind of a star to this kind of a role, it’s like he stepped back to step forward.”
       Principal photography was set to begin in fall 2011, according to a 7 Sep 2011 HR item, and lasted thirty-three days, as stated in the 3 Dec 2012 Time. A 19 Nov 2012 LAT item reported that the production budget was $21 million.
       According to a 23 Nov 2012 WSJ article, Pat’s wedding song in Quick’s novel was not “My Cherie Amour” by Stevie Wonder but “Songbird” by Kenny G; however, WSJ clarified that the Stevie Wonder song did exist in Quick’s original manuscript, but the author had later changed it due to “a licensing snag.” Russell reverted to “My Cherie Amour” in the film as he felt that the Kenny G song might not translate to the screen as comically as Stevie Wonder’s tune.
       A 15 Nov 2012 HR news item reported that the Weinstein Company had cancelled their original wide release plans set for 21 Nov 2012 in favor of a platform release, with the film opening in 400 theaters instead of 1,500 or 2,000, and expanding to more venues in early Dec 2012. Prior to theatrical release, the film was shown in more than 200 “word-of-mouth screenings” designed to increase awareness, as stated in a 29 Oct 2012 LAT article.
       Critical reception was predominantly positive. In a 22 Nov 2012 LAT brief, critic Kenneth Turan urged moviegoers to see Silver Linings Playbook, calling it “a complete success from a team of singular talents.” Joe Morgenstern of WSJ deemed it “the best movie so far this year” in his 16 Nov 2012 review, while the 21 Sep 2012 HR lauded its outstanding ensemble cast and “anchoring lead performances” by Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence. As of 30 Dec 2012, the film had grossed $36 million worldwide, as reported by a PR Newswire item of the same date.
       Silver Linings Playbook was named as one of AFI’s Movies of the Year. Jennifer Lawrence won an Academy Award for Actress in a Leading Role, and the film received the following Academy Award nominations: Best Picture; Actor in a Leading Role (Bradley Cooper); Actor in a Supporting Role (Robert De Niro); Actress in a Supporting Role (Jacki Weaver); Director; Film Editing; and Writing (Adapted Screenplay). The film won the Toronto International Film Festival’s “People’s Choice Award,” as announced in a 17 Sep 2012 DV item. Jennifer Lawrence received a Golden Globe award for Best Performance by an Actress - Comedy or Musical; and the film received the following Golden Globe nominations: Best Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical; Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical (Jennifer Lawrence); Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical (Bradley Cooper); and Best Screenplay – Motion Picture (David O. Russell). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
1 Jun 2007.
---
Daily Variety
9 Apr 2009
p. 1, 9.
Daily Variety
17 Sep 2012.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 2009
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Sep 2011.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 2012.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 2012
p. 52.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 2012.
---
Los Angeles Times
20 Sep 2012
Section D, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
29 Oct 2012
Section D, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
16 Nov 2012
Section D, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
19 Nov 2012
Section D, p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
22 Nov 2012
Section D, p. 3.
New York Times
16 Nov 2012
Section C, p. 1.
PR Newswire
30 Dec 2012.
---
Rolling Stone
6 Dec 2012.
---
Time
3 Dec 2012
p. 66.
Variety
23 Sep 2012
p. 19, 31.
WSJ
16 Nov 2012
Section D, p. 5.
WSJ
23 Nov 2012
Section D, p. 4.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
The Weinstein Company presents
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-exec prod
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
"A" cam/Steadicam op
"A" cam 1st asst
"A" cam 2d asst
"B" cam op
"B" cam 1st asst
"B" cam 2d asst
Film loader
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Gen op
Basecamp gen op
Rigging gaffer
Best boy rigging gaffer
Key grip
Best boy grip
"A" cam dolly grip
"B" cam dolly grip
Key rigging grip
Best boy rigging grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Graphic artist
Art dept coord
Art prod asst
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Ed prod asst
Ed prod asst
Ed prod asst
Film runner
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
3d prop
Charge scenic
Scenic foreman
Cam scenic
Industrial
Industrial
Industrial
Scenic
Scenic
Scenic
Scenic
Scenic
Scenic
Set dec leadman
Set dec foreman
Set dec buyer
Set dec buyer
Set dec warehouseman
On set dresser
Addl on set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const coord
Const foreman
Const asst
Const asst
Shop craft
Shop craft
Shop craft
Shop craft
Shop craft
Shop craft
Shop craft
Shop craft
Shop elec
Tool foreman
Key const grip
Const grip
Const grip
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Set cost
Set cost
Cost prod asst
MUSIC
Mus/Score prod
Mus supv
Score rec and mixed by
Midi supv and prep
Mus prod coord
Tech supv
Mus rec and mixed at
Personal asst
Asst mus supv
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
2d boom/Utility
Utility
Playback mixer
Playback mixer
Video assist
Video assist utility
Supv sd ed/Des
Supv dial/ADR ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley dancer
Foley mixer
Foley mixer
Foley ed
Foley asst
Foley rec at
ADR mixer
ADR rec at
ADR mixer, Todd AO
ADR mixer, Sony Pictures Studios
ADR voice casting
ADR voice casting, The Loop Squad
ADR voice casting, The Loop Squad
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec eng
Re-rec at
Dolby sd consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Opticals
A Technicolor company
Visual eff
Visual eff supv, Dive
Visual eff creative supv, Dive
Visual eff prod, Dive
Visual eff coord, Dive
Visual eff exec prod, Dive
Visual eff prod supv, Dive
Visual eff ed, Dive
Asst visual eff ed, Dive
Compositor, Dive
Compositor, Dive
Compositor, Dive
Compositor, Dive
Compositor, Dive
3D lead, Dive
Paint artist, Dive
Digital col, Dive
Addl visual eff
Exec in charge of bus and legal affairs, The Weins
Exec in charge of bus and legal affairs, The Weins
DANCE
Choreog
Asst choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup dept head/Makeup: Mr. Cooper
Makeup: Mr. De Niro
Key makeup artist
1st makeup artist
Hair dept head/Stylist: Mr. Cooper
Hair stylist: Mr. De Niro
Key hair stylist
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Key office prod asst
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Asst to Mr. Russell
Asst to Mr. Russell
Asst to Mr. Russell
Asst to Ms. Gigliotti
Asst to Mr. Cohen
Asst to Mr. Gordon
Asst to Mr. Parra
Asst to Mr. Cooper
Asst to Ms. Lawrence
Asst to Mr. De Niro
Prod asst to Mr. De Niro
Dialect coach
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
2d asst accountant
2d asst accountant
Payroll accountant
Accounting clerk
Post prod accountant
Asst loc mgr
Loc coord
Loc scout
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc prod asst
Security supv
Loc principals/Extras casting
Loc principals/Extras casting
Loc principals/Extras casting
Unit pub
Medic
Medic
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation co-capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Rights & clearances by
Rights & clearances, Entertainment Clearances
Rights & clearances, Entertainment Clearances
Product placement by
Product placement coord, Stone Management
Product placement coord, Stone Management
Catering provided by
Chef, Tony's Food Service, Inc.
Cook, Tony's Food Service, Inc.
Cook, Tony's Food Service, Inc.
Cook, Tony's Food Service, Inc.
Craft service
2d craft service
Addl craft service
Addl craft service
Addl craft service
Post prod supv
Post prod coord
Exec in charge of physical prod, The Weinstein Com
Exec in charge of post prod, The Weinstein Company
Exec in charge of mus, The Weinstein Company
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Pat stunt double
Pat Sr. stunt double
Dolores stunt double
Danny stunt double
Tomboy girl stunt
Indian stunt #1
Indian stunt #2
Police stunt #1
Police stunt #2
Tailgater stunt #1
Tailgater stunt #2
Tailgater stunt #3
Tailgater stunt #4
Tailgater stunt #5
Stunt driver
Utility stunt
Utility stunt
Tiffany test double
COLOR PERSONNEL
Digital intermediate
A Technicolor company
Digital intermediate col
Digital intermediate prod
Digital intermediate ed
Digital col asst
Digital col asst
Digital col asst
Digital col asst
Imaging tech
Imaging tech
Imaging tech
Imaging tech
Digital restoration
Digital restoration
Digital restoration
Data tech
Data tech
Data tech
[Col by]
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Silver Linings Playbook by Matthew Quick (New York, 2008).
AUTHOR
MUSIC
"Unsquare Dance," written by Dave Brubeck, performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet, courtesy of Derry Music Company
"Amore a Forza," written and performed by Piero Piccioni, courtesy of IDM Music Ltd. on behalf of Bixio and Cinevox Records Srl
"Popeye's Clog," written and performed by Evan Lurie
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MUSIC
"Unsquare Dance," written by Dave Brubeck, performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet, courtesy of Derry Music Company
"Amore a Forza," written and performed by Piero Piccioni, courtesy of IDM Music Ltd. on behalf of Bixio and Cinevox Records Srl
"Popeye's Clog," written and performed by Evan Lurie
"Cesaroni's Tango," written and performed by Andrea Guerra, courtesy of IDM Music Ltd. on behalf of Bixio and Cinevox Records Srl
"Devil Tango," written and performed by Evan Lurie, courtesy of IDM Music Ltd. on behalf of Bixio and Cinevox Records Srl
"Maria," written by Leonard Bernstein & Stephen Sondheim, performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet, courtesy of Derry Music Company.
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SONGS
"My Cherie Amour," written by Stevie Wonder, Henry Crosby & Sylvia Moy, performed by Stevie Wonder, courtesy of Motown Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Always Alright," written by Zachary Cockrell, Heath Fogg, Brittany Howard & Steven Johnson, performed by Alabama Shakes, courtesy of ATO Records, LLC, by arrangement with District Music, LLC
"Rain in My Eyes," written and performed by Joan Shaw, courtesy of Tuff City Records, by arrangement with Ocean Park Music Group
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SONGS
"My Cherie Amour," written by Stevie Wonder, Henry Crosby & Sylvia Moy, performed by Stevie Wonder, courtesy of Motown Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Always Alright," written by Zachary Cockrell, Heath Fogg, Brittany Howard & Steven Johnson, performed by Alabama Shakes, courtesy of ATO Records, LLC, by arrangement with District Music, LLC
"Rain in My Eyes," written and performed by Joan Shaw, courtesy of Tuff City Records, by arrangement with Ocean Park Music Group
"Hard to Find," written and performed by William Kimball, courtesy of Stonewall Productions
"What Is and What Should Never Be," written by Jimmy Page & Robert Plant, performed by Led Zeppelin, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
"Buffalo," featuring Mountain Man, written by Joe Newman, Gus Unger-Hamilton, Gwil Sainsbury & Thom Green, performed by Alt-J, courtesy of Canvasback Music/Atlantic Records, under license from Infectious Music, Ltd. for North America
"The Moon of Manakoora," written by Frank Loesser & Alfred Newman, performed by Les Paul & Mary Ford, courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from EMI Film & Television Music
"Monster Mash," written by Leonard L. Capizzi & Robert Pickett, performed by CrabCorps
"Goodnight Moon," written by Lawrence McVinnie & Ambrosia Parsley, performed by Ambrosia Parsley and the Elegant Too
"Now I'm a Fool," written by Josh Homme & Jessie Hughes, performed by Eagles of Death Metal, courtesy of Downtown Records, by arrangement with Rekords Rekords
"Girl from the North Country," written by Bob Dylan, performed by Bob Dylan with Johnny Cash, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Don' You Worry 'Bout a Thing," written and performed by Stevie Wonder, courtesy of Motown Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Silver Lining," written by Diane Warren, performed by Jessie J, courtesy of Lava/Universal, Republic Records
"Hello Operator," written by Jack White, performed by The White Stripes, courtesy of Third Man Records
"Hey Big Brother," written by Dino Fekaris & Nickolas Zesses, performed by Rare Earth, courtesy of Motown Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Willie Willie," written by Will Schaefer, courtesy of APM Music
"Street Cadence," written by Gordon Henderson, performed by UCLA Bruin Marching Band, courtesy of UCLA Marching Band
"Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," written by Ralph Blane & Hugh Martin, performed by Frank Sinagra, courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from EMI Film & Television Music
"Guarapiranga," written by Tomaz Di Cunto, performed by Toco, courtesy of Schema Records
"Sway," written by Norman Gimbel, Pablo Beltran Ruiz & Luis Demetrio Traconis Molina, performed by Tribute Beat, courtesy of IDM Music Ltd. on behalf of Pattaya America Inc.
"Fell in Love with a Girl," written by Jack White, performed by The White Stripes, courtesy of Third Man Records
"Misty," written by Johnny Burke & Erroll Garner, performed by Johnny Mathis, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing.
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DETAILS
Release Date:
16 November 2012
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 16 November 2012
Production Date:
began fall 2011
Physical Properties:
Sound
Datasat Digital Sound in selected theatres; Dolby® Digital in selected theatres
Color
Technicolor; Kodak
Duration(in mins):
122
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
47848
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When Pat Solatano is released from an eight-month stay at the Karel Psychiatric Facility in Baltimore, Maryland, his mother, Dolores, arrives to pick him up. Pat asks Dolores to give Danny, a fellow patient, a ride back to their hometown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Dolores reluctantly agrees. However, once the three are on the road, she receives a call from the hospital and learns that Danny does not have permission to leave. Dolores returns Danny to Karel and reprimands Pat for lying to her. Later that day, Pat, Sr. is surprised to see his son when he and Dolores return home and asks if Pat was legally permitted to leave Karel, reminding them that the hospital stay was court-ordered. Dolores assures her husband that the release was court-approved, and they change the subject to Pat, Sr.’s plans to open a cheese steak restaurant. Concerned that Pat, Sr. has been making money through bookmaking, Pat asks how the operation will be funded, but Pat, Sr. urges him not to worry about it. Mentioning that he’s lost weight, Pat announces his plans to exercise and read the books listed on a class syllabus created by his wife Nikki, a high school teacher, in order to mend his broken marriage. Pat, Sr. warns that Nikki sold their house and moved on, but Pat ignores him. One night, Pat reads Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, one of the selections on Nikki’s syllabus, and becomes irate when he reaches the ending, throwing the book out the window and waking his parents to complain about ... +


When Pat Solatano is released from an eight-month stay at the Karel Psychiatric Facility in Baltimore, Maryland, his mother, Dolores, arrives to pick him up. Pat asks Dolores to give Danny, a fellow patient, a ride back to their hometown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Dolores reluctantly agrees. However, once the three are on the road, she receives a call from the hospital and learns that Danny does not have permission to leave. Dolores returns Danny to Karel and reprimands Pat for lying to her. Later that day, Pat, Sr. is surprised to see his son when he and Dolores return home and asks if Pat was legally permitted to leave Karel, reminding them that the hospital stay was court-ordered. Dolores assures her husband that the release was court-approved, and they change the subject to Pat, Sr.’s plans to open a cheese steak restaurant. Concerned that Pat, Sr. has been making money through bookmaking, Pat asks how the operation will be funded, but Pat, Sr. urges him not to worry about it. Mentioning that he’s lost weight, Pat announces his plans to exercise and read the books listed on a class syllabus created by his wife Nikki, a high school teacher, in order to mend his broken marriage. Pat, Sr. warns that Nikki sold their house and moved on, but Pat ignores him. One night, Pat reads Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, one of the selections on Nikki’s syllabus, and becomes irate when he reaches the ending, throwing the book out the window and waking his parents to complain about it. The next day, Pat attends a mandatory therapy session. As he signs in at the doctor’s office, “My Cherie Amour,” a song by Stevie Wonder, is playing and Pat demands that the receptionist turn it off. When she says she can’t, Pat knocks over a magazine rack. As he sits down with Dr. Cliff Patel, Pat accuses the therapist of playing the song on purpose, and Cliff admits that he did it to see if the song still triggered a violent response. Pat explains to Cliff how he came to hate the song, which was his wedding song, saying that he came home from his high school teaching job one day to find Nikki and another teacher, Doug Culpepper, having sex in the shower while “My Cherie Amour” played on a stereo. Pat admits to snapping and brutally beating the man, but says he refuses to take any medication for his bipolar disorder because he dislikes how it makes him feel. Back at home, Pat’s father, Pat, Sr., who is highly superstitious, asks him to watch a Philadelphia Eagles football game on television, believing that Pat will turn the team’s luck around. Observing that Pat, Sr. holds a special handkerchief and frequently reorganizes his remote controls while watching the game, Pat accuses his father of obsessive-compulsive disorder and goes for a run. While running, Pat stops by the high school where he used to work, and the principal ushers him away. After returning home, Pat attempts to call Nikki but his father stops him, reminding him of the restraining order that forbids Pat from contacting her. The doorbell interrupts, and police officer Keogh appears, warning Pat to stay away from his old school and his old house as he is in danger of violating Nikki’s restraining order. In another session with Cliff, Pat tells the doctor the philosophy he adopted at Karel: if a person works as hard as he can and stays positive, he has a chance at a “silver lining.” Cliff encourages Pat to work on a strategy to use in moments when he becomes enraged. That Sunday, Pat goes to his friend Ronnie’s house for dinner with Ronnie, his wife Veronica, and her younger sister, Tiffany. After Pat learns that Tiffany’s husband Tommy, a police officer, recently died, he and Tiffany discuss the various psychotropic drugs they have been prescribed for mental problems. Abruptly, Tiffany leaves her seat at the dinner table and demands that Pat walk her home. Outside, Tiffany offers to have sex with Pat, but he refuses, reminding her that he is married. When she claims to be married too, Pat tells Tiffany that her husband is dead. Tiffany cries on Pat’s shoulder then slaps his face and storms away. At home, Pat searches for his wedding video in a panic and wakes his parents up in need of help. Tortured by mental images of his wife’s infidelity and his own violent response, Pat accidentally elbows his mother in his face. Pat, Sr. retaliates, and the father and son exchange punches until Officer Keogh shows up. The next day, Dolores and Pat, Sr. ensure that Pat takes his medication. On another run, Pat sees Tiffany, who confronts him about treating her poorly. Tiffany says she knows she has a reputation for being promiscuous, but she has passed that stage in her life and embraces both her flaws and her attributes, asking if Pat can say the same about himself. At Pat’s next therapy session, Cliff suggests that Tiffany might just need a friend and encourages Pat to be there for her. Soon after, Pat and Tiffany meet for dinner, and she offers to break the law by delivering a letter from Pat to Nikki. Tiffany admits to spiraling downward after Tommy’s death and getting fired from her job after sleeping with eleven different people at her office. Pat offends Tiffany by suggesting that she is crazier than he, and Tiffany storms out, rescinding her offer to deliver his letter. Outside a movie theater, Pat catches up to Tiffany but she makes a scene, shouting that Pat is harassing her. A group of teenagers, led by one of Pat’s neighbors, torments him by playing a recording of “My Cherie Amour,” and Pat tries to calm himself. When Officer Keogh arrives, Tiffany defends Pat, apologizing and saying that she called out for help as a joke. Pat brings his letter to Tiffany the next day, and she demands a return favor, asking Pat to be her partner at an upcoming dance competition. Soon after, Tiffany and Pat begin dance rehearsals at her house. When Pat doesn’t show enough emotion on the dance floor, Tiffany tells him the story of her husband’s death, explaining that Tommy was run over by a car while helping someone with a flat tire. Over time, they practice different styles of dance and Pat begins to improve. One morning, Pat, Sr. asks his son to go to the Eagles game on Sunday with his older brother, Jake, for good luck. He laments that he cannot go himself because he has been barred from the stadium after too many fistfights. Pat agrees and asks Tiffany if he can split his time between the game and dance rehearsal on Sunday. Tiffany does not approve, but provides Pat with a letter that Nikki has written in response to Pat’s. He reads the letter out loud, which states that Nikki is encouraged by Pat’s progress but still wary about their relationship. She writes that she needs to see something that proves Pat’s transformation. Tiffany suggests that the “something” Nikki needs to see could be their dance performance. That Sunday, Pat goes to the Eagles game with Jake and runs into Cliff at a tailgate party. When a group of racist fans appear, harassing Cliff and his Indian friends, Pat tries to stay out of the altercation but eventually joins the fray. Pat, Jake, and Cliff are arrested, and later, at the Solatano house, Pat, Sr. reprimands his sons, devastated that the Eagles lost and he no longer has the capital for his restaurant. Tiffany arrives, angry that Pat missed their dance practice, and Pat, Sr. blames the Eagles’ loss on Pat’s involvement with Tiffany. However, Tiffany argues that every time she and Pat have spent time together during an Eagles game, the Eagles have won. Pat, Sr.’s betting partner, Randy, offers Pat a chance to reclaim his money with another bet. They agree to a parlay, a two-part bet wherein Pat, Sr. must predict the winner of the Eagles’ game against the Dallas Cowboys as well as Pat and Tiffany’s score at the dance competition. Pat, Sr. bets on the Eagles and says that Tiffany and Pat will score a five out of ten with their dance. Pat discourages the bet by refusing to take part in the dance competition. He steps outside to re-read the letter from Nikki and notices a peculiar turn of phrase that Tiffany used only moments ago. Meanwhile, Tiffany tells Pat, Sr. and Dolores that the only way to get Pat to the competition is to lie to him and say Nikki will be there. The following Sunday, the Eagles game is underway as the dance competition begins at the Benjamin Franklin Hotel. Pat’s family and friends watch the Eagles game on a television in the hotel lobby while Pat and Tiffany head upstairs to check in. When Tiffany spots Nikki in the lobby, she panics and ambushes Ronnie and Veronica, who are friends with Nikki, wanting to know why they brought her there. Ronnie tells his sister-in-law that Pat should have a chance to repair his marriage. In tears, Tiffany disappears to the bar, drinks vodka, and flirts with a random man. Meanwhile, the Eagles win, and Pat, Sr. rushes to the dance floor to catch Pat and Tiffany’s performance. Pat finds Tiffany as their names are called and drags her to the dance floor, where they deliver a spirited, if unconventional, performance, earning an average score of 5.0. Having won the parlay for Pat, Sr., Tiffany and Pat scream in triumph. When Pat walks over to Nikki and whispers into her ear, however, Tiffany leaves the hotel in tears. Moments later, Pat looks for Tiffany but Pat, Sr. informs him that Tiffany left. Pat, Sr. says that Tiffany loves Pat and encourages his son to take advantage of the moment. Pat catches up to Tiffany outside and gives her a letter that he wrote one week ago declaring his love for her. They kiss passionately, and the next Sunday, Tiffany joins Pat’s family to watch the football game.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.