Gravity (2013)

PG-13 | 91 mins | Science fiction | 4 October 2013

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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HISTORY

The film begins with the prologue: “At 600km above planet Earth the temperature fluctuates between ♦258 and -148 degrees Fahrenheit. There is nothing to carry sound, no air pressure, no oxygen. Life in space is impossible.”
       On 7 Oct 2010, HR announced that actress Sandra Bullock was negotiating with Warner Bros. for the starring role of “Ryan Stone” in Gravity, after a pending deal with Natalie Portman fell through. At that time, Robert Downey, Jr., had been cast as “Matt Kowalski” and director-writer-producer Alfonso Cuarón was preparing for production with his co-writer and son, Jonás Cuarón. According to HR, Gravity began at Universal Pictures as an Angelina Jolie vehicle, but when the property moved to Warner Bros., Jolie was denied her $20 million fee and left the project. The studio subsequently considered Marion Cotillard, Blake Lively, and Scarlett Johansson, before briefly re-engaging Jolie. A 17 Dec 2010 HR news item announced that George Clooney had been hired to replace Downey, Jr., who left the project mid-Nov 2010 just as Bullock’s casting was confirmed. Principal photography was scheduled to begin spring 2011, after Clooney finished filming The Ides of March (2011, see entry). While the 7 Oct 2010 Var reported the film was originally budgeted at $80 million, a 4 Oct 2013 LAT article speculated that the cost reached $110 million.
       According to a 9 Sep 2013 LAT article, Cuarón waited four years to make the picture, biding his time until technology caught up with his vision. In addition, Cuarón and his team, including ... More Less

The film begins with the prologue: “At 600km above planet Earth the temperature fluctuates between ♦258 and -148 degrees Fahrenheit. There is nothing to carry sound, no air pressure, no oxygen. Life in space is impossible.”
       On 7 Oct 2010, HR announced that actress Sandra Bullock was negotiating with Warner Bros. for the starring role of “Ryan Stone” in Gravity, after a pending deal with Natalie Portman fell through. At that time, Robert Downey, Jr., had been cast as “Matt Kowalski” and director-writer-producer Alfonso Cuarón was preparing for production with his co-writer and son, Jonás Cuarón. According to HR, Gravity began at Universal Pictures as an Angelina Jolie vehicle, but when the property moved to Warner Bros., Jolie was denied her $20 million fee and left the project. The studio subsequently considered Marion Cotillard, Blake Lively, and Scarlett Johansson, before briefly re-engaging Jolie. A 17 Dec 2010 HR news item announced that George Clooney had been hired to replace Downey, Jr., who left the project mid-Nov 2010 just as Bullock’s casting was confirmed. Principal photography was scheduled to begin spring 2011, after Clooney finished filming The Ides of March (2011, see entry). While the 7 Oct 2010 Var reported the film was originally budgeted at $80 million, a 4 Oct 2013 LAT article speculated that the cost reached $110 million.
       According to a 9 Sep 2013 LAT article, Cuarón waited four years to make the picture, biding his time until technology caught up with his vision. In addition, Cuarón and his team, including visual effects supervisor Tim Webber and director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki, invented techniques to create “elastic shots,” combining live action, computer-generated imagery (CGI), computerized robots generally used in factory assembly lines, and a custom-made, twenty by ten foot cube “light box,” containing “196 2-by-2 foot panels fitted with 4,096 [LED] lights,” as noted in the 18 Oct 2013 HR. Each of the lights had individual controls, projecting beams on the faces of Bullock and Clooney to indicate their characters’ environment. Action inside the “light box” was filmed with an Arri Alexa digital camera, but eighty percent of the picture was animated by computer, even the clear visors of the actors’ spacesuits.
       Webber noted that his staff of computer graphics (CG) animators at Framestore in London, England, had to relearn their craft, applying laws of physics in outer space, such as zero gravity and lack of air resistance. Unofficially advised by NASA, Lubezki and the visual effects crew worked to portray the ninety-minute duration of daytime that is consistent with orbits around Earth, and matched light sources with the characters’ location above their home planet, including “cool blue lights” when they were orbiting over the ocean, and “warmer colors” reflecting the African desert. Another innovation of the production was a “12-wire rig with a carbon-fiber harness,” in which Bullock was controlled by puppeteers and filmed by various cameras on a “motion-control rig” to portray tumbling through space. CG sequences were created in 3D, while the live action scenes were filmed in 2D and later converted to 3D.
       As noted in a 14 Oct 2013 Time article, the film’s custom technology posed risks to the production, since there were no means of immediate replacement or repair. On the first day Bullock was scheduled to perform in the “light box,” crewmembers discovered the floor emitted electric shocks. It was also challenging to comfortably position the actors in their harnesses and maintain the impression of weightlessness. According to the 9 Sep 2013 LAT, Bullock mentioned her hardships during production to an audience at the Toronto Film Festival, noting that she was isolated and “whipped around” in the “light box” for prolonged periods of time, but that her solitude and duress were filtered back into her character.
       Despite the fact that space is devoid of sound, supervising sound editor/sound designer Glenn Freemantle conveyed resonance that occurs through physical contact and other vibrations, such as breathing and movement. The 18 Oct 2013 HR stated that many of the film’s sound effects were recorded with contact microphones at automobile factories and hospitals, as well as experimenting with recording a guitar, submerged in water.
       Cuarón told Time that he filmed the picture with a third main character in mind. He stated that the camera was neither intended to depict Bullock’s point of view, nor an objective perspective of her plight, but rather a “third astronaut… the audience.” With the aim to immerse the audience with plausible, yet otherworldly visual spectacles, Cuarón wanted his viewers to project their own “emotional experience… onto the screen in a primal way.” Production neared its end in early Oct 2011, as noted in the 3 Oct 2011 Var.
       According to various contemporary sources, including the 4 Jul 2013 LAT, the picture had been prepared for a Nov 2012 release, but in May 2012, Warner Bros. pushed the opening back nearly one year, to 4 Oct 2013. Gravity premiered 28 Aug 2013 on opening night of the Venice Film Festival. It was the first 3-D picture to open the festival, but was not considered for competition. It also screened at the Toronto Film Festival on 8 Sep 2013.
       While critics praised the film, scientists pointed out its inaccuracies, including the erroneously clear view of Earth, as noted by astronaut Buzz Aldrin in an 8 Oct 2013 LAT article, and the fact that the Hubble Space Telescope and the International Space Station are in “vastly different orbits,” with distances impossible to traverse, as reported in the 1 Oct 2013 NYT. Although several NASA members were consultants on the film, including uncredited astronaut Catherine “Cady” Coleman and Andrew Thomas, who is credited onscreen as “astronaut advisor,” NASA declined to provide official production support. An unidentified Gravity filmmaker told LAT that NASA was deterred by the picture’s depiction of space travel dangers. However, the film’s 4 Oct 2013 release coincided with the 2013 U.S. federal government shutdown, in which 97% of NASA employees were left out of work, and the agency subsequently amended its stance on the production. Coleman and astronaut Michael J. Massimo were provided to publicize the film, participating in “question-and-answer sessions” at public screenings, as well as giving interviews about the scientific aspects of the picture. Reflecting on the more accurate parts of Gravity, the astronauts stated that space debris is indeed a real threat, as is space sickness, but they also indicated that astronaut undergarments are not as flattering as Bullock’s athletic undershirt and shorts.
       Test audience surveys indicated an opening weekend box-office gross of up to $45 million, but Gravity surpassed expectation to earn $1.4 million its opening night and $55.6 million total in its first three days of release, according to various contemporary sources, including the 7 Oct 2013 LAT and WSJ. The earnings marked the largest Oct-debut grosses in motion picture history, as well as the biggest opening in Bullock’s career. Despite market trends showing decreased 3-D film attendance, Gravity sold more 3-D tickets its opening weekend than those of previous blockbusters, such as Avatar (2009, see entry), Alice in Wonderland (2010, see entry), and Life of Pi (2012, see entry). An 18 Oct 2013 WSJ item reported that Gravity had earned $200 million, worldwide, in two weeks, and speculated that the picture would ultimately gross over $500 million.
       Gravity was named one of AFI’s Movies of the Year in 2013. It was nominated for Golden Globe awards in the following motion picture categories: Best Picture -- Drama, Best Performance by an Actress -- Drama, and Best Original Score. Alfonso Cuarón won a Golden Globe for Best Director. The film was also nominated for three Academy Awards in the following categories: Actress in a Leading Role, Production Design, and Best Picture. It won seven Academy Awards for Cinematography, Directing, Film Editing, Music (Original Score), Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, and Visual Effects.
       End credits include the following acknowledgments: “A mi mamá, gracias,” and, “The producers would like to thank: Guillermo Del Toro, Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarritu, Tim Sexton, James Cameron, David Fincher, Robert Richardson, Fred Waldman, Marty Wickman, Bob Wotherspoon, Ryan McGuire.” Also included is the statement: “Filmed at Shepperton Studios in England and on location in Lake Powell, Arizona” and, “The Major League Baseball trademarks depicted in this motion picture were licensed by the Major League Baseball Properties, Inc.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
7 Oct 2010.
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Hollywood Reporter
17 Dec 2010.
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Hollywood Reporter
29 Aug 2013.
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Hollywood Reporter
18 Oct 2013.
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Los Angeles Times
4 Jul 2013
Section D, p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
9 Sep 2013.
---
Los Angeles Times
4 Oct 2013
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
4 Oct 2013
Section B, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
7 Oct 2013
Section D, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
8 Oct 2013
Section D, p. 1.
New York Times
1 Oct 2013
Section D, p. 1.
New York Times
4 Oct 2013
p. 1.
Time
14 Oct 2013.
---
Variety
7 Oct 2010.
---
Variety
20 Oct 2010.
---
Variety
3 Oct 2011.
---
Variety
28 Aug 2013.
---
WSJ
7 Oct 2013
Section B, p. 5.
WSJ
18 Oct 2013
Section D, p. 1.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXTS
A Warner Bros. Pictures Presentation
An Esperanto Filmoj Produktado
A Heyday Films Production
An Alfonso Cuarón Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
1st asst dir, Addl unit
2d asst dir
2d asst dir, Addl unit
3d asst dir
Unit prod mgr, Arizona unit
1st asst dir, Arizona unit
Unit prod mgr, Addl photog
1st asst dir, Addl photog
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Cam op
Steadicam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Motion control op
Motion control op
Lighting supv, Addl unit
Chief lighting elec
Best boy
Rigging gaffer
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
LED lighting tech
LED lighting tech
Key grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
2d asst cam, Addl unit
Chief lighting tech, Addl unit
Video op, Addl unit
Motion control op
Cam equip supplied by
Cam cranes supplied by
Lighting equip by
Motion picture products
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Supv art dir
Concept artist
Concept artist
Concept artist
Concept artist
3-D concept modeller
3-D concept modeller
3-D concept modeller
3-D concept modeller
3-D concept modeller
Illustrator
Illustrator
Illustrator
3-D draughtsman
Graphic artist
Graphic artist
Art dept coord
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
3-D conform ed
Digital acquisition supv
Digital acquisition prod
Digital rec
Digital lab tech
Codex op
Codex op
Codex op
Digital acquisition coord
HD playback op
HD playback op
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Prod buyer
Asst set dec
Standby wireman
Standby wireman
Standby carpenter
Standby rigger
Standby rigger
Standby rigger
Prop master
Props storeman
Chargehand standby props
Dressing propman
Standby propman
Prop buyer
HOD modeller
Supv prop modeller
Supv prop modeller
Supv prop modeller
Senior prop modeller
Senior prop modeller
Senior prop modeller
Senior prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Prop modeller
Const mgr
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost coord
Cost to Ms. Bullock
Cost to Ms. Bullock
Cost to Mr. Clooney
MUSIC
Asst mus ed
Vocals
Score mixed & rec
Score mixed & rec
Score mixed & rec
Score mixed & rec
Score mixed & rec
Score mixed & rec
Score mixed & rec
Score mixed & rec
SOUND
Supv sd ed/Sd des
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer/Sd des ed
Supv dial/ADR ed
Prod sd mixer
Sd des ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Pro tools op
Sd playback op
Boom op
Foley ed
Foley artist
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
Mix tech
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
CG supv
Visual eff supv
Visual eff prod, Framestore
Compositing supv
Compositing supv
CG modeling supv
CG lighting supv
CG seq supv
CG seq supv
CG eff supv
CG simulation supv
Look development lead
Senior R&D artist
Previsualization artist
Stereoscopic supv
Spec eff supv
Spec eff supv
Visual eff prod mgr
Visual eff ed
Visual eff coord
VFX coord & lead matchmover
Visual eff asst ed
Asst visual eff coord
Matchmover
Motion control robots provided by
Motion control robots, Bot & Dolly
Motion control robots, Bot & Dolly
Motion control robots, Bot & Dolly
Motion control robots, Bot & Dolly
Visual eff
Addl CG supv, Framestore
Addl CG supv, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
CG modeller, Framestore
Rigging supv, Framestore
Rigging lead, Framestore
Rigging lead, Framestore
Rigging artist, Framestore
Rigging artist, Framestore
Rigging artist, Framestore
Rigging artist, Framestore
Rigging artist, Framestore
Rigging artist, Framestore
Rigging artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Texture artist, Framestore
Previsualisation supv, Framestore
Previsualisation artist, Framestore
Previsualisation artist, Framestore
Previsualisation artist, Framestore
Previsualisation artist, Framestore
Previsualisation artist, Framestore
Previsualisation artist, Framestore
Previsualisation artist, Framestore
Previsualisation artist, Framestore
Previsualisation artist, Framestore
Tech previsualisation, Framestore
Tech previsualisation, Framestore
Tech previsualisation, Framestore
Tech previsualisation, Framestore
Tech previsualisation, Framestore
Lead anim, Framestore
Lead anim, Framestore
Lead anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Anim, Framestore
Simulation lead, Framestore
Simulation lead, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
Simulation artist, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting lead, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG lighting artist, Framestore
CG environment lead, Framestore
Environment TD, Framestore
Environment TD, Framestore
Environment TD, Framestore
Environment TD, Framestore
Environment TD, Framestore
Stereo cam layout, Framestore
CG eff lead, Framestore
CG eff lead, Framestore
CG eff lead, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
CG eff artist, Framestore
Matte painting supv, Framestore
Matte painter, Framestore
Matte painter, Framestore
Matte painter, Framestore
Matte painter, Framestore
Matte painter, Framestore
Matte painter, Framestore
Asst TD, Framestore
Asst TD, Framestore
Asst TD, Framestore
Asst TD, Framestore
Asst TD, Framestore
Asst TD, Framestore
Addl compositing supv, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Lead compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Compositor, Framestore
Plate dimensionalisation lead, Framestore
Rotoscope lead, Framestore
Rotoscope lead, Framestore
Rotoscope lead, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Rotoscope artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Matchmove artist, Framestore
Visual eff prod, Framestore
Visual eff prod, Framestore
Visual eff prod, Framestore
Assoc visual eff prod, Framestore
Visual eff prod mgr, Framestore
Visual eff prod mgr, Framestore
Visual eff prod mgr, Framestore
Visual eff prod mgr, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Visual eff coord, Framestore
Addl visual eff supv, Framestore
Addl visual eff supv, Framestore
Visual eff ed, Framestore
Visual eff ed, Framestore
Visual eff ed, Framestore
Visual eff ed, Framestore
Visual eff ed, Framestore
Visual eff ed, Framestore
Head of R&D, Framestore
Research & development, Framestore
Research & development, Framestore
Research & development, Framestore
Research & development, Framestore
Research & development, Framestore
Research & development, Framestore
Research & development, Framestore
Head of shading, Framestore
Shading, Framestore
Shading, Framestore
Shading, Framestore
Shading, Framestore
Prod tools, Framestore
Prod tools, Framestore
Prod tools, Framestore
Pipeline lead TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Pipeline TD, Framestore
Motion capture supv, Framestore
Motion capture TD, Framestore
Motion capture TD, Framestore
Motion capture TD, Framestore
Motion capture TD, Framestore
Motion capture TD, Framestore
Motion capture TD, Framestore
Render support, Framestore
Render support, Framestore
Render support, Framestore
Render support, Framestore
Render support, Framestore
Render support, Framestore
Chief technology officer, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Systems eng, Framestore
Data operations, Framestore
Data operations, Framestore
Addl stereographers
Addl stereographers
Spec eff floor supv
Spec eff floor supv
Spec eff coord
Spec eff lead senior tech
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff senior tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff modeller
Spec eff modeller
Spec eff modeller
Visual eff by
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Visual eff, Rising Sun Pictures
Mova motion capture services by
3-D digital services by
Senior stereographer, Prime Focus Film
Head of prod, Prime Focus Film
Stereo management, Prime Focus Film
Stereo management, Prime Focus Film
Stereo management, Prime Focus Film
Stereo management, Prime Focus Film
Stereo management, Prime Focus Film
Stereo management, Prime Focus Film
Stereo management, Prime Focus Film
Stereo management, Prime Focus Film
Visual eff by
Cyber and lidar scanning by
Facial scanning by
Addl cyber scanning by
End credits by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist to Ms. Bullock
Hair stylist to Ms. Bullock
Hair stylist to Mr. Cooney
PRODUCTION MISC
Financial controller
Prod coord
Casting
Casting
Casting
Post prod exec
Post prod supv
Post prod supv
Prod accountant
Post prod coord
Greenland casting
Greenland casting
Scr supv
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Asst to Mr. Heyman
Exec asst to Ms. Bullock
Asst to Mr. Clooney
Environmental steward
Physical trainer to Ms. Bullock
Physical trainer to Ms. Bullock
Support staff to Mr. Cuarón
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Technical robot asst
Technical robot asst
Astronaut advisor
Medical advisor
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Standby stagehand
Movement coach
Movement artist
Movement artist
Movement artist
Movement artist
Movement artist
Movement artist
Unit medic
Health & safety adv
Security
Caterer
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Asst stunt coord
Asst stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
ANIMATION
Senior anim supv
Anim supv
Lead anim
Lead anim
COLOR PERSONNEL
Supv digital col
Colour tech
Look development colorist
Digital intermediate
Digital colorist, Technicolor Creative Services
Digital intermediate prod, Technicolor Creative Se
Digital intermediate ed, Technicolor Creative Serv
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Angels Are Hard To Find," written and performed by Hank Williams Jr., courtesy of Curb Records Inc.
"Mera Joota Hai Japani," written by Shailendra and Shankar Jaikishan
"Sinigit Meerannguaq," written by Juaaka Lyberth
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SONGS
"Angels Are Hard To Find," written and performed by Hank Williams Jr., courtesy of Curb Records Inc.
"Mera Joota Hai Japani," written by Shailendra and Shankar Jaikishan
"Sinigit Meerannguaq," written by Juaaka Lyberth
"Destination Anywhere," written and performed by Chris Benstead and Robin Baynton
"922 Anthem," written by Gaurav Dayal, performed by 922 featuring Gaurav Dayal, courtesy by Crucial Music Corporation
"Ready," written by Charles Leslie Scott and Chelsea Lynne Hinshaw, performed by Charles Scott featuring Chelsea Williams, courtesy of Bad Robot Productions.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 October 2013
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 4 October 2013
Production Date:
ended early October 2011
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
Copyright Date:
20 November 2013
Copyright Number:
PA1869301
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby® Digital in selected theatres; Datasat Digital Sound; SDDS Sony Dynamic Digital Sound®
Color
Prints
Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
91
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
48004
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In outer space, doctor Ryan Stone installs a prototype scanning system on the Hubble Space Telescope during her first space expedition, while veteran astronaut Matt Kowalski prepares to retire after their STS-517 mission is complete. Communicating with ground control in Houston, Texas, the astronauts learn that a Russian satellite has been intentionally detonated, sending a cloud of debris into orbit, but they are not in danger. As Kowalski entertains Houston with yarns about his romantic conquests, the astronauts suddenly receive emergency orders to abort the mission and return to their spaceship, Explorer. The debris collided with other matter causing a chain reaction, which now travels toward them at high speed. Stone is reluctant to leave, as the scanner panel is still initializing, but Kowalski demands she follow orders. Houston warns that satellites have become inoperable, and telecommunication systems are nearly defunct: the astronauts must expect “blackout” at any moment. Just then, debris hits Explorer, cutting off communications with Houston, killing a third astronaut named Shariff, and sending Stone spinning into space. She maintains radio contact with Kowalski and reports seeing the International Space Station, giving him an indication of her whereabouts. After moments of complete detachment, with no response, Stone hears Kowalski once again, asking her to shine a flashlight. Stone is frightened and losing oxygen, but Kowalski coaches her to relax. As the astronauts reunite, Kowalski tethers their spacesuits together, then uses his jetpack to thrust them toward Explorer. ... +


In outer space, doctor Ryan Stone installs a prototype scanning system on the Hubble Space Telescope during her first space expedition, while veteran astronaut Matt Kowalski prepares to retire after their STS-517 mission is complete. Communicating with ground control in Houston, Texas, the astronauts learn that a Russian satellite has been intentionally detonated, sending a cloud of debris into orbit, but they are not in danger. As Kowalski entertains Houston with yarns about his romantic conquests, the astronauts suddenly receive emergency orders to abort the mission and return to their spaceship, Explorer. The debris collided with other matter causing a chain reaction, which now travels toward them at high speed. Stone is reluctant to leave, as the scanner panel is still initializing, but Kowalski demands she follow orders. Houston warns that satellites have become inoperable, and telecommunication systems are nearly defunct: the astronauts must expect “blackout” at any moment. Just then, debris hits Explorer, cutting off communications with Houston, killing a third astronaut named Shariff, and sending Stone spinning into space. She maintains radio contact with Kowalski and reports seeing the International Space Station, giving him an indication of her whereabouts. After moments of complete detachment, with no response, Stone hears Kowalski once again, asking her to shine a flashlight. Stone is frightened and losing oxygen, but Kowalski coaches her to relax. As the astronauts reunite, Kowalski tethers their spacesuits together, then uses his jetpack to thrust them toward Explorer. He continues talking to Houston, even though there is no response, and orders Stone to set her watch timer for ninety minutes, the amount of time it will take the lethal debris to orbit Earth and return to their trajectory. The pair seize their fallen comrade, Shariff, whose face has been pierced by debris, and return to Explorer, where they discover they are the sole survivors. Abandoning ship, Kowalski uses his jetpack to channel himself and Stone in a spacewalk toward the International Space Station, strategizing that they can use one of its two Soyuz escape pods to return to Earth. As the tethered astronauts float to their destination, the sun rises at Earth’s horizon, and Kowalski asks Stone what she would be doing on an average morning in her hometown of Lake Zurich, Illinois. She replies that she drives aimlessly, listening to the radio, because she was at the wheel when she got news that her four-year-old daughter was killed in a playground accident. Ever since then, she has not wanted to stop driving. As they approach the space station, Stone runs short of oxygen and Kowalski’s jetpack loses power. He notices that one Soyuz escape pod is gone and the other is stuck mid-launch with its parachute already released, making a mission back to Earth impossible. Engaging the remaining power in his jetpack, Kowalski accelerates toward the station. Upon impact, the astronauts grasp unsuccessfully for handholds and their tether is severed, but Stone remains connected to the station by a stray parachute rope. As Kowalski is pulled into space, Stone manages to seize his tether and insists on pulling him closer, but he explains they will both die if she tries to save him. Declaring that Stone is a survivor, Kowalski detaches himself and floats away to certain death. However, the astronauts remain in radio contact, and Kowalski directs Stone to the station’s air lock. He orders her to pilot the remaining Soyuz spacecraft to a Chinese space station called Tiangong that shines in the distance. Stone admits she repeatedly crashed a simulator Soyuz during her six-month astronaut training process, but she perseveres, insisting that she can use the spacecraft to save Kowalski. In response, Kowalski advises his friend to “learn to let go” and marvels at the sun shining over the Ganges, before losing contact. Stone makes her way into the station and removes her helmet, gasping for air. After making failed attempts to radio Kowalski, Stone declares she is the sole survivor of STS-517. Just then, a fire ignites in the station. Stone grabs a fire extinguisher and dodges a fireball by escaping into the Soyuz. There, she follows an instruction manual and attempts to launch, with seven minutes remaining before the debris completes its orbit. However, the spacecraft becomes tangled in its ejected parachute. As she leaves the pod to perform the necessary detachment, debris shoots through space and crashes into the station. The impact releases the Soyuz, and she climbs back into the pod, only to discover its rocket launchers are out of fuel. She tries to radio Houston or the Chinese Station, Tiangong, but instead exchanges signals with a drunken radio operator on Earth who does not speak English. As she cries, contemplating her death, tears float weightless into space. She hears the man sing lullabies to his gurgling baby, hopes to be reunited with her daughter in the afterlife, and shuts down the capsule’s oxygen. Just as she loses consciousness, Kowalski appears at the pod window, thrusts it open, and lets himself inside. Reengaging the spaceship’s air supply, Kowalski instructs Stone to use the landing jets, instead of the launchers, but she is reticent about attempting a task she failed in training. Kowalski points out that Stone is simply afraid to live, and tells her, “It is time to go home.” Stone suddenly regains consciousness and realizes Kowalski’s visit was imagined, but restarts the spaceship’s control system and plots her return to Earth. Speaking aloud, Stone asks Kowalski to visit her daughter in heaven, and reassure the girl of her mother’s love. As the Soyuz propels past Tiangong, Stone ejects herself, clutching the fire extinguisher she seized at the International Space Station, and discharges its contents to thrust her toward the spacecraft. Grasping its exterior, Stone forces an air lock door open, only to find the station near destruction. She floats into an escape pod, programs it to eject toward Earth, and waits in turbulence as Tiangong explodes. Unsure she will make it home alive, Stone declares aloud she is now ready to return, but whatever the outcome, she will embrace the challenge of her journey. The pod hurtles through space and breaks through the Earth’s atmosphere, where it releases its parachute and lands in a remote lake. Houston is unable to identify Stone’s spacecraft, but announces that a rescue mission is on the way. A fire breaks out in the pod, and it sinks into the lake. Fighting for survival, Stone pushes her way out and swims to the muddy shore. There, she rejoices at being alive, with a new appreciation for gravity, which secures her feet to the ground as she takes her first, shaky steps back on Earth. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.