Janie (1944)

100 mins | Comedy | 2 September 1944

Director:

Michael Curtiz

Producer:

Alex Gottlieb

Cinematographer:

Carl Guthrie

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Although Joyce Reynolds was "introduced" in her onscreen billing, this was not her film debut. HR news items add the following information about the production: Columbia Pictures completely financed the stage play and received $40,000 of the $100,000 that Warner Bros. paid for the film rights. Cora Sue Collins was considered for the role of "Janie." Edward Arnold was borrowed from M-G-M and Robert Benchley was borrowed from Paramount for the project. Some scenes were shot on location at Malibu Lake, California. Owen Marks was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Editing. Janie was the first film in a proposed "Janie" series. After Joyce Reynolds married and temporarily retired from films, Warner Bros. dropped plans for the series. A HR news item dated 6 Mar 1945 notes that the studio revived the idea due to popular demand and subsequently went on to produce one other film, Janie Gets Married with Joan Leslie (see ... More Less

Although Joyce Reynolds was "introduced" in her onscreen billing, this was not her film debut. HR news items add the following information about the production: Columbia Pictures completely financed the stage play and received $40,000 of the $100,000 that Warner Bros. paid for the film rights. Cora Sue Collins was considered for the role of "Janie." Edward Arnold was borrowed from M-G-M and Robert Benchley was borrowed from Paramount for the project. Some scenes were shot on location at Malibu Lake, California. Owen Marks was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Editing. Janie was the first film in a proposed "Janie" series. After Joyce Reynolds married and temporarily retired from films, Warner Bros. dropped plans for the series. A HR news item dated 6 Mar 1945 notes that the studio revived the idea due to popular demand and subsequently went on to produce one other film, Janie Gets Married with Joan Leslie (see below). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
29 Jul 1944.
---
Daily Variety
25 Jul 44
p. 3.
Film Daily
25 Jul 44
p. 21.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 1943.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Nov 43
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Dec 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Dec 43
p. 4, 8
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Aug 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Feb 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Mar 45
pp. 1-2.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Feb 44
p. 1747.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
29 Jul 44
p. 2017.
New York Times
5 Aug 44
p. 16.
Variety
26 Jul 44
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff dir
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Janie by Josephine Bentham and Herschel V. Williams, Jr. as produced by Brock Pemberton (New York, 10 Sep 1942).
SONGS
"Keep Your Powder Dry," music and lyrics by Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn.
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 September 1944
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 4 August 1944
Production Date:
late December 1943--early March 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
2 September 1944
Copyright Number:
LP12810
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
100
Length(in feet):
9,497
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9989
SYNOPSIS

When the town of Hortonville is chosen as the site for an army base, newspaper editor Charles Conway writes a concerned editorial about the effect that the soldiers will have on high school girls like his seventeen-year-old daughter Janie. Janie compounds her father's worries when she accompanies her friend, Wilber "Scooper" Nolan, to a blanket party. Although the party is innocent, a photographer from Life takes pictures of the teenagers eating, dancing and necking. While Charles travels to Washington, D.C. in an attempt to obtain a needed printing press, the army moves into town. As feared, all the girls become preoccupied with the soldiers, and Charles returns home to find a picture of Janie and Scooper kissing on the cover of Life . He also discovers his friend, John Van Brunt, ensconced in the family guest room because the hotel was commandeered by the army. Then Lucile, Charles' wife, gets a call from her old friend, Thelma Lawrence, a widow, whose son Dick, an army private, is now stationed in Hortonville. On an impulse, Lucile invites Thelma to stay with them. Expecting to hate Dick, Janie is pleasantly surprised to find that he is very attractive, and Dick returns her feelings, causing Scooper to become jealous. After telling Janie how much he cares for her, Scooper swears that he is through with women. When Dick and Janie learn that the adults are all going to an American Legion dance, they make a date to spend the evening together. Their plans are thwarted, first by Janie's younger sister Elsbeth, who proclaims her intent to stay up all night, then by Janie's ... +


When the town of Hortonville is chosen as the site for an army base, newspaper editor Charles Conway writes a concerned editorial about the effect that the soldiers will have on high school girls like his seventeen-year-old daughter Janie. Janie compounds her father's worries when she accompanies her friend, Wilber "Scooper" Nolan, to a blanket party. Although the party is innocent, a photographer from Life takes pictures of the teenagers eating, dancing and necking. While Charles travels to Washington, D.C. in an attempt to obtain a needed printing press, the army moves into town. As feared, all the girls become preoccupied with the soldiers, and Charles returns home to find a picture of Janie and Scooper kissing on the cover of Life . He also discovers his friend, John Van Brunt, ensconced in the family guest room because the hotel was commandeered by the army. Then Lucile, Charles' wife, gets a call from her old friend, Thelma Lawrence, a widow, whose son Dick, an army private, is now stationed in Hortonville. On an impulse, Lucile invites Thelma to stay with them. Expecting to hate Dick, Janie is pleasantly surprised to find that he is very attractive, and Dick returns her feelings, causing Scooper to become jealous. After telling Janie how much he cares for her, Scooper swears that he is through with women. When Dick and Janie learn that the adults are all going to an American Legion dance, they make a date to spend the evening together. Their plans are thwarted, first by Janie's younger sister Elsbeth, who proclaims her intent to stay up all night, then by Janie's girl friends, who have invited their dates to meet them at Janie's house as their own parents refuse to let them go out with soldiers because of Charles's editorial. After Janie convinces Elsbeth to spend the night with their grandmother, Dick accompanies her to the bus. In the meantime, Scooper calls the base and invites all available soldiers to a party at Janie's house to prevent her from being alone with Dick. Making the best of it, the girls in turn invite all their friends, and April, the Conway's maid, happily cooks enough hot dogs to feed everyone. Still intending to stay up all night, Elsbeth directs Dick to the wrong bus, where they meet Professor Reardon, a former teacher of Dick's and the man responsible for allotting a printing press to Charles. Dick entrusts Elsbeth to Reardon and hurries back to Janie's to find the party in full swing. The neighbors complain about the noise, and the party breaks up just before Janie's parents and the military police arrive, leaving the house in a terrible mess. When a colonel from the base arrives to survey the damage, Janie makes an impassioned speech in defense of the soldiers, and after Elsbeth brings Reardon home, everything is happily resolved. Soon the soldiers are sent overseas, but just as they say goodbye, a group of Marines marches into town. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.