Full page view
HISTORY

In the opening cast credits, Charlotte Henry appears last, however, the opening title card reads: "Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland with Charlotte Henry as 'Alice.'" End credits were missing from the viewed print. The release dialogue script in the Paramount story files at the AMPAS Library reveals that the end credits were listed in alphabetical order, as appears above. According to Paramount files, over 7,000 applicants were screened for the role of "Alice" before Charlotte Henry was chosen after a five month search. A news item in MPD notes that Charles Laughton and Mary Boland were originally cast in the film, and a HR news item noted that Charles Butterworth was tested for a role. A HR news item reported that William Cameron Menzies was loaned by Fox to co-direct the "trick sequences" of this film; however, the extent of his contribution to the film other than as screenwriter has not been determined. Various 1933 news items in MPD and correspondence between Mary Pickford and Walt Disney reveal they had planned a combination live action and animated production, possibly in color, of Alice in Wonderland , but were unable to obtain the rights to the story as the rights had been purchased in England by Paramount on 9 May 1933. Copyright records note that research was conducted at the Henry E. Huntington Library in San Marino, CA, which maintains first editions of Lewis Carroll's works. The film was released one year after the 100th anniversary of Carroll's birth, which brought public attention to Carroll's most famous work. In Jun 1931, Eva LeGallienne produced a play at ... More Less

In the opening cast credits, Charlotte Henry appears last, however, the opening title card reads: "Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland with Charlotte Henry as 'Alice.'" End credits were missing from the viewed print. The release dialogue script in the Paramount story files at the AMPAS Library reveals that the end credits were listed in alphabetical order, as appears above. According to Paramount files, over 7,000 applicants were screened for the role of "Alice" before Charlotte Henry was chosen after a five month search. A news item in MPD notes that Charles Laughton and Mary Boland were originally cast in the film, and a HR news item noted that Charles Butterworth was tested for a role. A HR news item reported that William Cameron Menzies was loaned by Fox to co-direct the "trick sequences" of this film; however, the extent of his contribution to the film other than as screenwriter has not been determined. Various 1933 news items in MPD and correspondence between Mary Pickford and Walt Disney reveal they had planned a combination live action and animated production, possibly in color, of Alice in Wonderland , but were unable to obtain the rights to the story as the rights had been purchased in England by Paramount on 9 May 1933. Copyright records note that research was conducted at the Henry E. Huntington Library in San Marino, CA, which maintains first editions of Lewis Carroll's works. The film was released one year after the 100th anniversary of Carroll's birth, which brought public attention to Carroll's most famous work. In Jun 1931, Eva LeGallienne produced a play at her Civic Repertory Theatre based on Carroll's novel, and again presented an adaptation of the novel by herself and Florida Friebus as a play on 12 Dec 1932, starring Josephine Hutchinson as "Alice." According to modern sources, Columbia was then interested in producing a film of Alice in Wonderland starring LeGallienne; however, Columbia abandoned the idea after Paramount bought the film rights. According to a 1934 DV news item, Samuel Drantowich filed suit against Paramount to prevent the exhibition of this film "on the grounds that it was made into a film in 1914" (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20 ; F1.0053). Drantowich's connection to the 1914 film and the outcome of the lawsuit has not been determined. Modern sources, including a filmography of W. C. Fields and a biography of Joseph L. Mankiewicz, indicate that Ida Lupino was considered for the role of Alice. Modern sources also credit LeRoy Prinz with Pageantry . Although one modern source speculates that the animated sequence of "The Carpenter and the Walrus" was created by the Fleischer brothers, other sources credit the team of Hugh Harman and Rudy Ising with the animation. In December, 1935, Kinematrade, Inc. released a 58 min. British film of the same title. Other films based on Lewis Carroll's novel are the 1951 Disney animated feature, directed by Clyde Geronimi, and Hamilton and Wilfred Jackson; and the 1972 British film Alice's Adventures in Wonderland , directed by William Sterling and starring Fiona Fullerton. In 1990 Woody Allen directed Alice , starring Mia Farrow, which loosely embodies the spirit of Carroll's novel. Dreamchild , a 1985 British film directed by Gavin Millar and starring Coral Browne and Ian Holm, explored the relationship between Lewis Carroll and the girl on whom his novel was based. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Dec 33
p. 3.
Film Daily
11 Dec 33
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun 33
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jul 33
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 33
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Nov 33
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
29 Mar 33
p. 4.
Motion Picture Daily
10 May 33
p. 2, 4
Motion Picture Daily
19 May 33
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald
16 Dec 33
p. 3.
New York Times
31 Mar 33
p. 22.
New York Times
23 Dec 33
p. 19.
Variety
26 Dec 33
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Photog
Tech eff
Tech eff
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Masks and cost
Masks and cost
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (London, 1865) and his novel Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll (London, 1870).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Fill Up the Glasses" and "Walk a Little Faster," lyrics by Lewis Carroll, music by Dave Franklin.
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 December 1933
Production Date:
began late September 1933
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
22 December 1933
Copyright Number:
LP4386
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75-76
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In nineteenth century England, Alice becomes bored while reading a book in the company of her cat, and climbs on top of the fireplace to look into a mirror. Alice steps through the mirror and falls into an enchanted land where chess pieces come to life, among other amazements. While following a White Rabbit, she falls down a tunnel, and after changing sizes several times, and nearly drowning in a puddle of mouse tears, she enters a garden. There she encounters the Dodo Bird who recites History to dry her off. A hookah-smoking caterpillar demonstrates how to change sizes by eating bits of mushroom, and at the Duchess', where the cook and the Duchess are fighting, Alice takes the Duchess's baby into her arms, but the child soon changes into a pig and Alice drops it. Alice continues through the garden, asking directions of the Cheshire Cat who only confuses her and dissolves into air. She then joins a tea party with the March Hare, the Mad Hatter, and the Dormouse. Later, Alice is saved from execution ordered by the Queen of Hearts because it is the executioner's day off. While walking with the Duchess, who is instructing her on morals, Alice encounters the Gryphon and the Mock Turtle. Twin brothers Tweedledee and Tweedledum recite the tale, "The Carpenter and the Walrus," but when they start to battle over a broken rattle, a crow appears and scares them off. An egg that Alice purchases grows into Humpty Dumpty, who attempts to explain the poem "Jabberwocky" until he falls off the wall and shatters. The bumbling White Knight has already sent his ... +


In nineteenth century England, Alice becomes bored while reading a book in the company of her cat, and climbs on top of the fireplace to look into a mirror. Alice steps through the mirror and falls into an enchanted land where chess pieces come to life, among other amazements. While following a White Rabbit, she falls down a tunnel, and after changing sizes several times, and nearly drowning in a puddle of mouse tears, she enters a garden. There she encounters the Dodo Bird who recites History to dry her off. A hookah-smoking caterpillar demonstrates how to change sizes by eating bits of mushroom, and at the Duchess', where the cook and the Duchess are fighting, Alice takes the Duchess's baby into her arms, but the child soon changes into a pig and Alice drops it. Alice continues through the garden, asking directions of the Cheshire Cat who only confuses her and dissolves into air. She then joins a tea party with the March Hare, the Mad Hatter, and the Dormouse. Later, Alice is saved from execution ordered by the Queen of Hearts because it is the executioner's day off. While walking with the Duchess, who is instructing her on morals, Alice encounters the Gryphon and the Mock Turtle. Twin brothers Tweedledee and Tweedledum recite the tale, "The Carpenter and the Walrus," but when they start to battle over a broken rattle, a crow appears and scares them off. An egg that Alice purchases grows into Humpty Dumpty, who attempts to explain the poem "Jabberwocky" until he falls off the wall and shatters. The bumbling White Knight has already sent his men to put Humpty back together again, so he escorts Alice to the end of the forest, after which she falls down a hill and becomes a queen. At a party in her honor, all the dishes start to dance and fly into the air. The Red Queen begins to strangle Alice, however, and she awakens back in her chair at home, with Dinah, her cat, who was the Red Queen in her dream. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.