Vagabond Lady (1935)

72 or 75 mins | Comedy-drama | 3 May 1935

Director:

Sam Taylor

Writer:

Frank Butler

Cinematographer:

Jack MacKenzie

Production Designer:

Stan Rogers

Production Companies:

Hal Roach Studios, Inc., Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

While the Cumulative Copyright Catalog, 1912-1939 lists Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Corp. as the copyright company of this film, the print viewed for this record lists Hal Roach Studios as the presenter. A working title for the film was The Girl Is Mine. Although HR pre-release news items list actors Mariska Aldrich, Feodor Kolin and Bobbie Koshay in the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been determined. Other HR pre-release news items indicate that production on this picture was halted in mid-Feb due to director Sam Taylor's bout with the flu. According to a DV pre-release news item, Ed Bernoudy filled in for Taylor during his illness. A 26 Jan DV article notes that actor Frank Craven replaced Joseph Cawthorn, who fell ill. According to the article, all footage featuring Cawthorn was scrapped.
       The file for the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library indicates that in Dec 1934 the PCA informed Hal Roach Studios that the script contained a number of "objectionable details," and requested that it remove any "suggestion of effeminacy in the appearance or manner of the floor-walker"; delete the word "tramp"; avoid the appearance of brutality in filming a "Corky's" fight scene; and to use care in shooting "prolonged or passionate kissing." ...

More Less

While the Cumulative Copyright Catalog, 1912-1939 lists Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Corp. as the copyright company of this film, the print viewed for this record lists Hal Roach Studios as the presenter. A working title for the film was The Girl Is Mine. Although HR pre-release news items list actors Mariska Aldrich, Feodor Kolin and Bobbie Koshay in the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been determined. Other HR pre-release news items indicate that production on this picture was halted in mid-Feb due to director Sam Taylor's bout with the flu. According to a DV pre-release news item, Ed Bernoudy filled in for Taylor during his illness. A 26 Jan DV article notes that actor Frank Craven replaced Joseph Cawthorn, who fell ill. According to the article, all footage featuring Cawthorn was scrapped.
       The file for the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library indicates that in Dec 1934 the PCA informed Hal Roach Studios that the script contained a number of "objectionable details," and requested that it remove any "suggestion of effeminacy in the appearance or manner of the floor-walker"; delete the word "tramp"; avoid the appearance of brutality in filming a "Corky's" fight scene; and to use care in shooting "prolonged or passionate kissing."

Less

PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
General (mod):
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Jan 1935
p. 1
Daily Variety
26 Jan 1935
p. 1
Daily Variety
18 Feb 1935
p. 5
Daily Variety
5 Mar 1935
p. 4
Film Daily
1 Apr 1935
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
11 Feb 1935
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
16 Feb 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 1935
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
28 Mar 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 1938
p. 8
Motion Picture Daily
29 Mar 1935
pp. 6-7
Motion Picture Herald
16 Mar 1935
p. 35
Motion Picture Herald
22 Jun 1935
p. 72
MPSI
1 Apr 1935
p. 10
New York Times
15 Jun 1935
p. 20
Variety
19 Jun 1935
p. 21
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Herbert Vigran
Robert E. Homans
Samuel T. Godfrey
Harry Northrup
Frank G. Fanning
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Sam Taylor Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Ed Bernoudy
Asst dir
Tom Flood
2nd asst dir
PRODUCERS
Pres
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Asst cam
Asst cam
Gaffer
Asst process cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Bernard Burton
Film ed
William H. Terhune
Supv film ed
Asst cutter
SET DECORATORS
W. L. Stevens
Set dresser
Joe MacDonald
Asst set dec
Asst props
Asst props
Asst props
Asst props
COSTUMES
Women's ward
Ward asst
SOUND
Rec eng
Second sd man
Harold King
Sd asst
Sd asst
VISUAL EFFECTS
process photog
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr clerk
Props
Don Sandstrom
Props
Standby carpenter
Standby carpenter
STAND INS
Stand-in for Robert Young
Pat Scott
Stand-in for Evelyn Venable
Stand-in for Reginald Denny
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Girl Is Mine
Release Date:
3 May 1935
Production Date:
early Feb--6 Mar 1935
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
2 May 1935
LP5532
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72 or 75
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
702
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Department store magnate R. D. Spear and his son John, descendants of the House of Spear, established in 1872 by Roger Spear, are dedicated to preserving the family tradition of "the undying dignity of mercantile enterprise." Meticulous in every matter of business and faithful to their motto, "dignity always," R. D. and John pride themselves on their refined tastes and highbrow endeavors. So much so, that when they receive a message announcing the arrival of John's wayward brother Tony, who has been adventuring in the Orient on his boat the "Vagabond Lady," they take every precaution to insure that he be kept away from the classy store customers. "Spiggs" Spiggins, the store janitor who is always drunk, is an old school chum of R. D.'s, so though he threatens to fire him, he cannot bring himself to do it. While Tony has been away, Spiggs's daughter Josephine, also a store employee, has been dating John, who has proposed marriage to her. When the happy-go-lucky Tony finally arrives, straight from the docks, he sends his family into a panic as he disrupts the quiet operation of the store with his loudness and uncouth manners. Though Josephine, who used to take part in Tony's youthful escapades, now fashions herself to be a refined woman, she still is able to appreciate the reprobate's spontaneity and zest for life. John, however, shuns Tony's reckless lifestyle and insists that they all attend an opera show rather than a circus. The next day, when Tony tells John that he took Josephine to the circus instead of the opera, John tells him that he has proposed marriage to her. John ...

More Less

Department store magnate R. D. Spear and his son John, descendants of the House of Spear, established in 1872 by Roger Spear, are dedicated to preserving the family tradition of "the undying dignity of mercantile enterprise." Meticulous in every matter of business and faithful to their motto, "dignity always," R. D. and John pride themselves on their refined tastes and highbrow endeavors. So much so, that when they receive a message announcing the arrival of John's wayward brother Tony, who has been adventuring in the Orient on his boat the "Vagabond Lady," they take every precaution to insure that he be kept away from the classy store customers. "Spiggs" Spiggins, the store janitor who is always drunk, is an old school chum of R. D.'s, so though he threatens to fire him, he cannot bring himself to do it. While Tony has been away, Spiggs's daughter Josephine, also a store employee, has been dating John, who has proposed marriage to her. When the happy-go-lucky Tony finally arrives, straight from the docks, he sends his family into a panic as he disrupts the quiet operation of the store with his loudness and uncouth manners. Though Josephine, who used to take part in Tony's youthful escapades, now fashions herself to be a refined woman, she still is able to appreciate the reprobate's spontaneity and zest for life. John, however, shuns Tony's reckless lifestyle and insists that they all attend an opera show rather than a circus. The next day, when Tony tells John that he took Josephine to the circus instead of the opera, John tells him that he has proposed marriage to her. John then enlists Tony's help in convincing Josephine that, though he engages in less cultured activities, he actually believes in the virtues of "poise, culture and dignity." Tony obliges his brother, but when he takes Josephine to a boring lecture, she resists his newly found interest in intellectual pursuits and insists that he take her to see his boat. Later, to her father's delight, Josephine announces that she will not marry the stodgy John after all. Josephine soon changes her mind, however, when Tony embarrasses her at a diving exhibition. As a result, she accepts John's marriage proposal. Upset at the news of Josephine's marriage plans, Tony takes to the sea, only to be joined by the drunken Spiggs, who refuses to give his daughter away to John at her Westport wedding. Believing he is doing the right thing, Tony decides to hold Spiggs on board his boat until he can sober him up and deliver him to the wedding. But when Josephine arrives to fetch her father, she misunderstands Tony's motives and believes that he is trying to spoil her wedding. Unable to dislodge her father from the boat, Josephine stays with him as the boat sets sail into bad weather. Once at sea, Josephine and Tony quarrel bitterly, but end their fight in an embrace, professing their love for each other. The next day, when Josephine discovers Tony missing, she believes he has deserted her and decides to go ahead with her wedding plans. Meanwhile, Tony rushes to Westport to stop the wedding, and just as they are about to seal their vows, Tony interrupts the ceremony and convinces John that Josephine is not a suitable bride for him. Tony then steals Josephine away to marry her himself.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Sampson-Schley Controversy

The Edison catalog summarized this film as follows: "This subject is in three scenes, showing beautiful dissolving effects. Scene 1. Shows Admiral Schley upon the bridge of the Brooklyn ... >>

Appointment by Telephone

The Edison catalog summarized this film as follows: “Two young men are seated in a broker's officer. A young lady calls one of them on the telephone and makes ... >>

Grandpa's Reading Glass

The Biograph catalog summarized this film as follows: “A very clever and interesting picture. A family group composed of grandpa, mamma and several children are seen about a library ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.