The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

R | 179 mins | 25 December 2013

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HISTORY

The film begins with a fictionalized television advertisement for Stratton Oakmont, a real-life Long Island, NY, stock market brokerage firm founded in the late 1980s by Jordan Belfort, whose autobiography, The Wolf of Wall Street (2007), was adapted as source material for the picture. After depicting the brokerage house at the height of its decadence and moral depravity, the film moves back in time to 1987, when Belfort began his first job on Wall Street as a newlywed underling, looking to make his fortune as a stockbroker. The picture is interspersed with voice-over narration by actor Leonardo DiCaprio portraying “Jordan Belfort.” The character reflects on past events and shares his subjective experience of the action onscreen, speaking directly to the audience. Scenes also depict aspects of Belfort’s imagination as if they are actual events in the story. The film intermittently features extensive motivational speeches by Belfort, addressing various audiences, including his employees at Stratton Oakmont and attendees at his seminar series.
       On 26 Mar 2007, DV announced that director Martin Scorsese was informally planning a film adaptation of Jordan Belfort’s “upcoming” autobiography The Wolf of Wall Street (2007), which detailed the former stockbroker’s debauchery before serving prison time for defrauding investors of nearly $200 million. The book was set for publication in late Sep 2007, by Bantam Books. Scorsese’s company, Sikelia Productions, was listed as the picture’s producer, along with Leonardo DiCaprio’s Appian Way, which had a “first-look” deal with Warner Bros. According to DV, Warner Bros. competed aggressively for film rights to Belfort’s book against actor Brad Pitt’s company, Plan B, which ... More Less

The film begins with a fictionalized television advertisement for Stratton Oakmont, a real-life Long Island, NY, stock market brokerage firm founded in the late 1980s by Jordan Belfort, whose autobiography, The Wolf of Wall Street (2007), was adapted as source material for the picture. After depicting the brokerage house at the height of its decadence and moral depravity, the film moves back in time to 1987, when Belfort began his first job on Wall Street as a newlywed underling, looking to make his fortune as a stockbroker. The picture is interspersed with voice-over narration by actor Leonardo DiCaprio portraying “Jordan Belfort.” The character reflects on past events and shares his subjective experience of the action onscreen, speaking directly to the audience. Scenes also depict aspects of Belfort’s imagination as if they are actual events in the story. The film intermittently features extensive motivational speeches by Belfort, addressing various audiences, including his employees at Stratton Oakmont and attendees at his seminar series.
       On 26 Mar 2007, DV announced that director Martin Scorsese was informally planning a film adaptation of Jordan Belfort’s “upcoming” autobiography The Wolf of Wall Street (2007), which detailed the former stockbroker’s debauchery before serving prison time for defrauding investors of nearly $200 million. The book was set for publication in late Sep 2007, by Bantam Books. Scorsese’s company, Sikelia Productions, was listed as the picture’s producer, along with Leonardo DiCaprio’s Appian Way, which had a “first-look” deal with Warner Bros. According to DV, Warner Bros. competed aggressively for film rights to Belfort’s book against actor Brad Pitt’s company, Plan B, which intended to produce the film for Paramount Pictures. Although a deal with Warner Bros. was secured on 23 Mar 2007, neither Scorsese nor DiCaprio had been officially attached to the property. However, screenwriter Terrence Winter, who was known at the time for his work on the HBO television series, The Sopranos (1999 – 2007), was hired to begin the adaptation “immediately.” DV also noted that despite losing the film rights bidding war against Warner Bros., Paramount retained a recently-established “first-look” deal with Scorsese, and the studio was therefore contractually permitted to co-finance and distribute any Scorsese picture, regardless of the property’s ownership.
       Later that year, a 3 Oct 2007 LAT article reported that Scorsese and DiCaprio planned to complete production on The Wolf of Wall Street before the pending Screen Actors Guild strike, which was anticipated to start summer 2008, but their efforts were thwarted by conflicts between Warner Bros. and Paramount. LAT explained that just one year earlier, Scorsese earned his first directorial Academy Award with the Warner Bros. picture The Departed (2006, see entry), and although the studio was eager to produce his next film, Scorsese accepted the “first-look” deal at Paramount for a reportedly “enormous” figure. The two studios were successfully orchestrating several co-productions at the time, including The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008, see entry), and Warner Bros. offered Paramount a fifty percent stake in financing The Wolf of Wall Street, but Paramount was unwilling to accept the deal without distribution rights. On 29 Oct 2007, Var reported that Scorsese and DiCaprio decided to delay their efforts on The Wolf of Wall Street to make Paramount’s Shutter Island (2010, see entry). A 4 Mar 2011 HR column noted that Warner Bros. had approached Ridley Scott to direct The Wolf of Wall Street in summer 2010.
       Over three years passed before a 17 Feb 2011 DV article announced that Scorsese finally made an official commitment to direct The Wolf of Wall Street, with DiCaprio in the starring role of “Jordan Belfort,” and both Appian Way and Sikelia producing. The film was set to mark the men’s fifth feature film collaboration. However, it remained uncertain if the film was still a Warner Bros. property, despite the studio’s relationship with Appian Way. According to DV, the picture’s financiers and start date were set to be disclosed at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2011. There, Red Granite Pictures purchased the film rights to Belfort’s book, as announced in a 7 May 2011 Var news item. Producers listed at the time were Irwin Winkler, Scorsese, and his head of production at Sikelia, Emma Tillinger Koskoff, as well as DiCaprio and his partner at Appian Way, Jennifer Killoran. Also included was Alexandra Milchan, who had been with the project since Warner Bros. first optioned it in 2007, but her participation later became the subject of a legal battle. As first reported in a 27 Aug 2012 DV article, Milchan filed suit against Red Granite for forcing her and her company, Emjag Productions, off the picture, and denying her wages and screen credit, but a 4 Oct 2012 HR column announced that the two parties settled out of court, and she was awarded an executive producer credit.
       On 20 Apr 2012, HR stated that production was scheduled to begin Aug 2012 in New York City, and a 2 Nov 2012 HR news item confirmed that the $100 million picture was “now shooting.” At that time, Paramount had secured domestic distribution rights, and Red Granite was reportedly seeking at least $10 million for “bigger territories” in foreign markets, a notably large sum for an independent production company. Just one week later, the 9 Nov 2012 HR announced that Universal Pictures International paid an undisclosed fee to acquire distribution rights to “select international territories,” including Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, and Scandinavia.
       Despite a planned 15 Nov 2013 release date, Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker were not yet finished with post-production and industry insiders speculated that the opening would be delayed until 2014, according to a 22 Oct 2013 LAT article. However, a 2 Dec 2013 NYT report announced that the film was finally complete on 27 Nov 2013, and was set for release on Christmas Day, 25 Dec 2013. NYT noted that the length and postponement of the opening was “rare brinkmanship” in the commencement of awards season, but the release secured the picture contention for 2013.
       The Wolf of Wall Street was named one of AFI’s Movies of the Year in 2013. It was nominated for one Golden Globe award, for Best Motion Picture. Leonardo DiCaprio won a Golden Globe in the category Best Performance by an Actor – Comedy or Musical. The film was nominated for five Academy Awards in the following categories: Actor in a Leading Role, Actor in a Supporting Role (Jonah Hill), Directing, Writing (Adapted Screenplay), and Best Picture.
       End credits include: “Special thanks to Jho Low” and acknowledgements to: ""Celso Lagar Artwork © Artist Rights Society (ARS) NY/ADAGP, Paris; " Popeye Meets Hercules [and] Family Matters Licensed by Warner Bros. Entertainment"; " The Equalizer " Courtesy of Unviersal Studios Licensing; "Stock footage courtesy of T3 Media"; " Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous Courtesy of CTD Clip Licensing"; "Charging Bull Sculpture by Arturo Di Modica, Charging Bull © Arturo Di Modica, 1998"; "Photos courtesy of Getty Images Bloomberg/Don Johnston/Tomas Stehlik/xPACIFICA, Stefan Swanepoel, William Warby, Petrea Burchard, Boston Sports Gallery/Dick Raphael Collection." Other “special thanks” acknowledgements are listed as the following: “New York State Governor’s Office of Motion Picture & Television Development; New York City Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment; Michael R. Bloomberg, Mayor; Katherine L. Oliver, Commissioner; New York Police Department, Movie & TV Unit; Nassau County Film Commission; Westchester County Film Commission; Federal Bureau of Investigation, Office of Public Affairs; Special Agent Anne Beagan; Supervisory Special Agent Martin Feely; Betsy Glick; Jackson Malle; David Koskoff; Kristin O’Connor; Rachael Anobile; Mark McElhatten; Gina Telaroli; Peter & Irene Pappas; Ari Emanuel; Christopher Donnelly; Rick Hohmann, Hewlett Packard; David Sparer and Kenneth Rowe, Canon; Suzette McLaughlin, Camper & Nicholsons International; Keith Winters, Inviro Studios; Rosamond Skypark Association; Temple University Marching Band; Digital Media Systems; Bloomberg.” End credits also state: “Filmed in part at the One & Only Ocean Club Bahamas with the cooperation of Island Hotel Company, Limited,” and, “Filmed at J. C. Studios, Brooklyn, New York”; “Filmed at Steiner Studios, Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York.” The picture was: “Filmed with the support of the New York State Governor’s Office for Motion Picture & Television Development.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Mar 2007
p. 1, 13.
Daily Variety
17 Feb 2011
p. 3.
Daily Variety
27 Aug 2012.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Mar 2011.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Apr 2012.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Oct 2012.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 2012.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 2012.
---
Los Angeles Times
3 Oct 2007
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
22 Oct 2013
Calendar, p. 2.
New York Times
2 Dec 2013
Section B, p. 1.
Variety
29 Oct 2007.
---
Variety
7 May 2011.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Paramount Pictures and Red Granite Pictures present
An Appian Way and Sikelia production
An EMJAG production
A Martin Scorsese Picture
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
2d unit dir, 2d unit photog
1st asst dir, 2d unit photog
1st asst dir, 2d unit photog
2d asst dir, 2d unit photog
2d asst dir, 2d unit photog
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-prod
Co-prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Line prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam loader
Video assist
Addl video asst
Video playback
Video playback
Video playback
Video playback
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Best boy/Rigging gaffer
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
Key rigging grip
Rigging grip best boy
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Set lamp op
Set lamp op
Set lamp op
Set lamp op
Set lamp op
Set lamp op
Generator op
Base camp generator op
Still photog
2d unit dir of photog, 2d unit photog
Close range aerial photog, 2d unit photog
MōVI op, 2d unit photog
MōVI op, 2d unit photog
Addl photog by
Prod, Addl photog, New Deal Studios
Prod, Addl photog, European unit
Cam & lighting equip provided by
Hydrascope telescoping crane arm by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Illustrator
Graphic artist
Art dept coord
Art dept prod asst
Art dept prod asst
FILM EDITORS
Assoc ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst set dec
Asst set dec
Leadman
Set dressing foreperson
On-set dresser
On-set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dec prod asst
Asset mgr
Lead greensperson
Greens foreman
On-set greens
Const coord
Key shop craftsman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Carpenter
Carpenter
Key const grip
Const grip foreman
Const grip
Const grip
Shop elec
Scenic charge
Scenic foreman
Industrial
Industrial
Cam scenic
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Asst prop master
Asst props
Asst props
Asst props
Aviation sets and interiors provided by
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Asst cost des
Ward supv
Cost supv
Personal costumer to Mr. Dicaprio
Set costumer
Set costumer
Set costumer
Set costumer
Set costumer
Set costumer
Tailor
Cost coord
Cost prod asst
Cost prod asst
Cost prod asst
Cost prod asst
Cost prod asst
Clothing for Leonardi DiCaprio provided by
Ward for Jonah Hill provided by
[Ward provided by]
[Ward provided by]
[Ward provided by]
[Ward provided by]
[Ward provided by]
[Ward provided by]
MUSIC
Exec mus prod
Mus supv
Asst mus ed
Source mus eng
Assoc mus prod
Mus coord
Mus clearances and legal services
Rights and clearances by
Rights and clearances, Entertainment Clearances
Rights and clearances, Entertainment Clearances
SOUND
Prod mixer
Boom op
2d boom op/Pro Tools playback
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Dial ed
Sd FX ed
Supv ADR ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley artist
Foley rec eng
1st asst sd ed
Asst sd FX ed
Addl re-rec mixer
Sd re-rec
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
Sd mixing facility coord
Dolby eng
Post prod sd facility
New York
Post prod sd mixing
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
VFX ed
Spec eff supv
Spec eff foreman
Mechanical storm seq supv
Spec eff gimbal foreman
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
VFX supv
VFX prod
VFX ed
VFX prod asst
Visual eff by
VFX supv, Scanline VFX
VFX consultant, Scanline VFX
VFX consultant, Scanline VFX
VFX prod, Scanline VFX
CG supv, Scanline VFX
Anim supv, Scanline VFX
Exec prod, Scanline VFX
Digital prod mgr, Scanline VFX
Prod management, Scanline VFX
Prod managment, Scanline VFX
Virtual cam crew, Scanline VFX
Virtual cam crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
VFX crew, Scanline VFX
Visual eff by
Visual eff supv, Method Studios
Visual eff prod, Method Studios
Head of prod, Method Studios
Visual eff prod mgr, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Digital artist, Method Studios
Pipeline TD, Method Studios
Systems eng, Method Studios
Systems eng, Method Studios
Visual eff by
Visual eff prod, Brainstorm Digital
Visual eff prod, Brainstorm Digital
Visual eff supv, Brainstorm Digital
Supv matte painter, Brainstorm Digital
Matte painter, Brainstorm Digital
Lead compositor, Brainstorm Digital
Digital compositor, Brainstorm Digital
Digital compositor, Brainstorm Digital
Digital compositor, Brainstorm Digital
Rotoscoping artist, Brainstorm Digital
Rotoscoping artist, Brainstorm Digital
VFX prod asst, Brainstorm Digital
Systems eng, Brainstorm Digital
Visual eff by
Visual eff supv, Crazy Horse East
Visual eff exec prod, Crazy Horse East
Visual eff prod, Crazy Horse East
Visual eff prod, Crazy Horse East
Compositing supv, Crazy Horse East
Compositing, Crazy Horse East
Compositing, Crazy Horse East
Compositing, Crazy Horse East
Compositing, Crazy Horse East
Compositing, Crazy Horse East
Compositing, Crazy Horse East
Compositing, Crazy Horse East
Compositing, Crazy Horse East
Compositing, Crazy Horse East
Matte painter, Crazy Horse East
Visual eff coord, Crazy Horse East
Visual eff coord, Crazy Horse East
VFX accountant, Crazy Horse East
Visual eff by
Visual eff supv, lola | VFX
Visual eff exec prod, lola | VFX
Visual eff prod, lola | VFX
Digital matte painter, lola | VFX
Compositor, lola | VFX
Compositor, lola | VFX
Compositor, lola | VFX
Compositor, lola | VFX
Compositor, lola | VFX
Addl compositing, lola | VFX
Title des
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Dept head hair
Key hair
Personal hairstylist to Mr. DiCaprio
Hairstylist
Addl hairstylists
Addl hairstylists
Dept head make-up
Key make-up
Make-up artist for Mr. DiCaprio
Make-up artist
Addl make-up artist
Addl make-up artist
Addl make-up artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Helicopter pilot
Helicopter pilot
Prod supv
Prod accountant
Loc mgr
Addl loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc coord
Parking coord
Unit prod asst
Unit prod asst
Security
J. A. G. Security
Prod secy
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
1st asst accountant
2d asst accountant
2d asst accountant
2d asst accountant
Payroll accountant
Payroll clerk
Const accountant
Accounting clerk
Claim coord
Dialect coach
Unit pub
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Asst to Mr. Scorsese
Asst to Mr. Scorsese
Asst to Mr. Winter
Asst to Mr. Aziz & Mr. McFarland
Asst to Mr. Aziz & Mr. McFarland
Asst to Mr. DiCaprio
Asst to Mr. DiCaprio
Asst to Ms. Koskoff & Ms. Kacandes
Asst to Mr. Winkler
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Res asst
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Background casting
Background casting assoc
Models casting
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Tech consultant
Scr supv, 2d unit photog
Scr supv, 2d unit photog
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Animal wrangler
Asst animal wrangler
Craft service
Craft service asst
Craft service asst
Craft service asst
Craft service asst
Product placement
Chief financial officer, Red Granite Pictures
Head of business and legal affairs, Red Granite Pi
Vice president, business & legal affairs, Red Gran
Legal affairs exec, Red Granite Pictures
Coord, Red Granite Pictures
Outside finance/Business management, Red Granite P
Nigro Karlin Segal & Feldstein
Outside counsel, Red Granite Pictures
Loeb & Loeb
Co-president, Sales and distribution, Red Granite
Co-president, Sales and distribution, Red Granite
Senior vice president, Sales and distribution, Red
Post prod supv
Post prod coord
Post prod asst
Post prod accountant
Trevanna Post
Asst post prod accountant
Trevanna Post
Dial, cont and spotting
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
COLOR PERSONNEL
Digital intermediate provided by
Digital intermediate col, Deluxe New York
Digital intermediate prod, Deluxe New York
Digital intermediate ed, Deluxe New York
Digital intermediate assoc col, Deluxe New York
Digital intermediate col asst, Deluxe New York
Dailies col, Deluxe New York
Head of prod, Deluxe New York
Account exec, Deluxe New York
[Col by]
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book The Wolf of Wall Street by Jordan Belfort (New York, 2007).
MUSIC
"Score From Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous," composed by Michael Karp
"Stars And Stripes Forever," written by John Philip Sousa, arranged by William D. Revelli.
SONGS
"Stratton Oakmont," composed by Theodore Shapiro, "Dust My Broom," written by Elmore James and Robert Johnson, performed by Elmore James, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Informercial," composed by Theodore Shapiro
"Exotic Vacations," composed by Theodore Shapiro
+
SONGS
"Stratton Oakmont," composed by Theodore Shapiro, "Dust My Broom," written by Elmore James and Robert Johnson, performed by Elmore James, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Informercial," composed by Theodore Shapiro
"Exotic Vacations," composed by Theodore Shapiro
"Dust My Blues," written by Joe Bihari and Elmore James, performed by Elmore James, courtesy of Capitol Records, LLC, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Spoonful," written by Willie Dixon, performed by Howlin' Wolf, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Mercy, Mercy, Mercy," written by Josef Zawinul, performed by Cannonball Adderley, courtesy of Capitol Records, LLC, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick," written by Ian Dury and Charles Jankel, performed by Ian Dury & The Blockheads, courtesy of Demon Music Group Ltd.
"Bang! Bang!," written by Jimmy Sabater and Joe Cuba, performed by Joe Cuba, courtesy of Fania Records
"Tear It Down," written by Clyde McCoy and Raymond Leveen, performed by Clyde McCoy, courtesy of Capitol Records, LLC, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Movin' Out (Anthony's Song)," written by Billy Joel, performed by Billy Joel, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Surrey With The Fringe On Top," written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, performed by Ahmad Jamal Trio, courtesy of Verve Music Group, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Road Runner," written by Ellas McDaniel, performed by Bo Diddley, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Smokestack Lightning," written by Chester Burnett, performed by Howlin' Wolf, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Double Dutch," written by Trevor Horn, Petrus Manelli and Malcolm McLaren, performed by Malcolm McLaren, courtesy of Virgin Records Ltd., under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Cloudburst," written by Jimmy Harris, Jon Hendricks and Leroy Kirkland, performed by Lambert, Hendricks & Ross, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Insane In The Brain," written by Louis Freeze, Larry Muggerud and Senen Reyes, performed by Cypress Hill, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"King Arthur, Act 3: What Power Art Thou," written by Henry Purcell, performed by The Monteverdi Choir, conducted by John Eliot Gardiner, courtesy of Erato Disques, by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
"Steve Madden 'Chick Walker' Commercial," composed by Human
"Never Say Never," written by Benjamin Bossi, Larry Carter, Debora Iyall, Peter Woods and Frank Zincavage, performed by Romeo Void, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"There Is No Greater Love," written by Isham Jones and Marty Symes, performed by Ahmad Jamal Trio, courtesy of Verve Music Group, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Boom Boom," written by John Lee Hooker, performed by John Lee Hooker, courtesy of Vee-Jay Limited Partnership
"C'est si bon," written by Ange Henri Betti and Andrew Hornez, performed by Eartha Kitt, courtesy of RCA Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Give Me Luv," written by Jean-Phillipe Aviance and Victor Imbres, performed by Alcatraz, courtesy of Yoshitoshi Records obo 1 Trax, by arrangement with The Royalty Network, Inc.
"Uncontrollable Urge," written by Mark Mothersbaugh, performed by Devo, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. and Virgin Records Ltd., by arrangement with Warner Music Group and under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Moonlight In Vermont," written by John Blackburn and Karl Suessdorf, performed by Ahmad Jamal Trio, courtesy of The Verve Music Group, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Pretty Thing," written by Willie Dixon, performed by Bo Diddley, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"In The Bush," written by Patrick Adams and Sandora Cooper, performed by Musique, courtesy of Unidisc Music, Inc.
"Can't Help Falling In Love," written by Luigi Creatore, Hugo Peretti and George Weiss
"Goldfinger," written by John Barry, Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley, performed by Sharon Jones & The DAP-Kings, courtesy of Daptone Records
"Baby Got Back," written by Anthony Ray, performed by Sir Mix-a-Lot, courtesy of American Recordings, LLC, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Everlong," written by Dave Grohl, performed by Foo Fighters, courtesy of Roswell Records, Inc.
"The Oompa Loompa Song," written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
"Hey Leroy, Your Mama's Callin' You," written by Jimmy Castor and John Pruit, performed by Jimmy Castor, courtesy of The Island Def Jam Music Group, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Sloop John B," written by Brian Wilson, performed by Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, courtesy of Fat Wreck Chords
"Boom Boom Boom," written by Lamar Hula Mahone and Keith D. Mayberry, performed by The Outhere Brothers, courtesy of Unidisc Music, Inc.
"I Need You Baby (Mona)," written by Ellas McDaniel, performed by Bo Diddley, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Meth Lab Zoso Sticker," written by Joie Calio and Phil Leavitt, performed by 7Horse, courtesy of 7Horse Music Ltd.
"Flying High (From Family Matters)," composed by Bennett Salvay and Jesse Frederick, courtesy of Warner Bros Entertainment Inc.
"I'm Popeye the Sailor Man (From Popeye Meets Hercules)," written by Sammy Lerner, courtesy of Paramount Pictures
"Get Us Down (From Family Matters)," composed by Bennett Salvay and Jesse Frederick, courtesy of Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc.
"I Don't Want To Walk Without You (From Popeye Meets Hercules)," written by Frank Loesser and Jule Styne, courtesy of Paramount Pictures
"Dream Lover (From Popeye Meets Hercules)," written by Clifford Grey and Victor Schertzinger, courtesy of Paramount Pictures
"Score From Popeye Meets Hercules (A Popeye Cartoon)," composed by Winston Sharples, courtesy of Paramount Pictures
"One Step Beyond," written by Cecil Campbell, performed by Inspecter 7, courtesy of Cleopatra Records
"Hip Hop Hooray," written by Vincent Brown, Antony Criss, Keir Gist, Ernie Isley, Marvin Isley, O'Kelly Isley, Ronald Isley, Rudolph Isley and Christopher Jasper, performed by Naughty By Nature, courtesy of Tommy Boy, by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
"Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting," written by Charles Mingus, performed by Charles Mingus, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
"Gloria," written by Giancarlo Bigazzi and Umberto Tozzi, performed by Umberto Tozzi, courtesy of Warner Music Italy SpA, by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
"Ca Plane Pour Moi," written by Francis Jean Deprijck and Yves Maurice A. Lacomblez, performed by Plastic Bertrand, courtesy of AMC Records
"Cast Your Fate To The Wind," written by Vince Guaraldi, performed by Allen Toussaint, courtesy of Gusto Records
"Mrs. Robinson," written by Paul Simon, performed by The Lemonheads, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
"The Money Chant," written by Robbie Robertson and Matthew McConaughey, performed by Robbie Robertson featuring Matthew McConaughey, produced by Howie B. and Robbie Robertson.
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DETAILS
Release Date:
25 December 2013
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 December 2013
Production Date:
began August 2012 in New York City
Copyright Claimant:
TWOWS, LLC
Copyright Date:
26 December 2013
Copyright Number:
PA1872685
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby® Digital in selected theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
179
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1987 New York City, newlywed Jordan Belfort, an aspiring millionaire, arrives for his first day of work at a Wall Street stock brokerage firm, only to learn that he will be relegated to transferring telephone calls. However, executive Mark Hanna takes a liking to the boy and invites him to lunch, where he advises Jordan to be ruthless, and to stoke his insatiable greed with sex and cocaine. Jordan follows orders, earns his brokerage license, and is soon promoted, but he loses his job on 19 October 1987, Black Monday, when international stock markets crash and the firm is forced to close. Jordan scours classified advertisements for work, convinced that he has no future as a stockbroker, but his wife, Teresa Petrillo, points out a listing for an “Investor Center” in Long Island. There, Jordan discovers a rudimentary boiler room of charlatans, selling “penny stock” investments to gullible Americans of modest means. Delighted to learn of the brokers’ fifty percent commission, Jordan uses his oratory skills and aggressive salesmanship to amass a fortune. He is befriended by a crude but ambitious neighbor named Donnie Azoff, and they establish their own firm, hiring Donnie’s drug-dealer friends as brokers. Jordan coaches the rogues to be effective salesmen, challenging them to sell him a writing pen, but they lack charisma, and are incapable of transforming a mundane tool into an object of desire. Business falters until Jordan changes the name of the firm to “Stratton Oakmont,” declaring that consumer trust is the key to securing investments. Following Jordan’s dictates, Stratton Oakmont grows into a billion dollar company by skimming large commissions from ... +


In 1987 New York City, newlywed Jordan Belfort, an aspiring millionaire, arrives for his first day of work at a Wall Street stock brokerage firm, only to learn that he will be relegated to transferring telephone calls. However, executive Mark Hanna takes a liking to the boy and invites him to lunch, where he advises Jordan to be ruthless, and to stoke his insatiable greed with sex and cocaine. Jordan follows orders, earns his brokerage license, and is soon promoted, but he loses his job on 19 October 1987, Black Monday, when international stock markets crash and the firm is forced to close. Jordan scours classified advertisements for work, convinced that he has no future as a stockbroker, but his wife, Teresa Petrillo, points out a listing for an “Investor Center” in Long Island. There, Jordan discovers a rudimentary boiler room of charlatans, selling “penny stock” investments to gullible Americans of modest means. Delighted to learn of the brokers’ fifty percent commission, Jordan uses his oratory skills and aggressive salesmanship to amass a fortune. He is befriended by a crude but ambitious neighbor named Donnie Azoff, and they establish their own firm, hiring Donnie’s drug-dealer friends as brokers. Jordan coaches the rogues to be effective salesmen, challenging them to sell him a writing pen, but they lack charisma, and are incapable of transforming a mundane tool into an object of desire. Business falters until Jordan changes the name of the firm to “Stratton Oakmont,” declaring that consumer trust is the key to securing investments. Following Jordan’s dictates, Stratton Oakmont grows into a billion dollar company by skimming large commissions from faulty investments and “pump and dump” schemes, where inexpensive stock prices are artificially inflated. Jordan hires his father, “Mad” Max Belfort, to add integrity to the operation while fueling his employees’ money lust with drugs and decadent orgies. With his own voracity for sex, cocaine, and Quaaludes, Jordan becomes increasingly frenzied and adulterous. Hosting one of many parties at his Long Island mansion, Jordan meets a young blonde named Naomi Lapaglia and becomes intent on possessing her, but she is covetous of his fortune and offers herself freely. When Jordan’s wife, Teresa, finds him snorting cocaine from Naomi’s breasts in his limousine, he is unable to deny his love for his mistress, and soon files for divorce. After proposing to Naomi and throwing himself a $2 million bachelor party, Jordan hosts a raucous wedding in the Bahamas, where he meets Naomi’s favorite aunt, a Londoner named Emma. The Belforts acquire an even larger mansion, have a daughter, Skylar, and continue their debauchery, but Naomi is displeased by Jordan’s infidelity and taunts him with her sexuality. Meanwhile, FBI agent Patrick Denham investigates Stratton Oakmont, hoping to combat Wall Street securities fraud operations. With the encouragement of his lawyer, Jordan and his cronies, including Donnie, ingest copious amounts of drugs and travel to Switzerland, where they meet banker Jean Jacques Saurel to open an account that is sheltered from U.S. law and FBI inquisition. When Jordan learns that the account must be established in the name of a non-American, he flies to London, England, and convinces Naomi’s aunt, Emma, to lend her identity. Although Emma successfully smuggles cash into Switzerland inside her luggage, Jordan and Donnie’s cash on hand is so enormous that he is forced to recruit other European smugglers, including the girl friend of Brad Bodnick, one of Stratton Oakmont’s first outlaw associates. As hostilities over the cash transactions intensify between Donnie and Brad, the men argue in a shopping mall parking lot and Brad is arrested. That evening, Donnie brings Jordan rare and potent “Lemmon” Quaaludes, hoping to appease his companion before he learns about Brad’s detainment. When the first pill does not take effect, the men swallow increasing numbers of the capsules, and Jordan receives a telephone call from his lawyer, ordering him to call back from a payphone. Still sober, Jordan drives his Lamborghini to a nearby country club and phones the attorney, who reports Brad’s arrest and warns Jordan that his home is now under surveillance. Just then, the Quaaludes take effect, and Jordan is neither able to talk nor walk. After dragging himself back to the Lamborghini, he receives a car phone call from Naomi, who complains that Donnie is intoxicated and making illogical transactions over the phone with Saurel, the Swiss banker. Fearing Donnie’s conversation will provide evidence to the FBI, Jordan navigates home in a drug-induced stupor and disconnects his friend from the telephone. Just then, Donnie chokes on a piece of deli meat. Jordan struggles to remain conscious, resuscitates himself with cocaine, and performs the Heimlich maneuver to save his partner. Sometime later, in an effort to withdraw from FBI surveillance, the two men take their wives to Italy on the Naomi, a 167-foot yacht Jordan purchased for his wife as a wedding present. There, they learn that Aunt Emma died, and Jordan is wrought with anxiety about the multi-million dollar Swiss bank account in her name. Despite the yacht captain’s warning of a pending storm, Jordan orders the Naomi to head for Monaco, so he can get to Switzerland without delay. That night, the yacht encounters perilous waves. Although all on board are saved, the Naomi sinks, and the airplane that Jordan charters for Switzerland explodes just before landing to collect him, killing three people. The collective near-death experiences inspire Jordan to become sober, and he establishes a “self-help” financial coaching service, pledging to make other people rich. During the filming of an infomercial, Jordan is arrested by Agent Denham; Jordan’s Swiss banker, Saurel, revealed evidence against Stratton Oakmont to the FBI when he was exposed for participation in another scheme. Although Jordan pays bail, he is disheartened by his home detention, and hopes to minimize his impending prison sentence by cooperating with the FBI and wearing a wiretap to incriminate his associates. During his next encounter with Donnie, however, Jordan secretly passes his friend a note, warning him that he is under surveillance. That evening, Jordan appeals to Naomi for sex, assuring her that he will only be in prison a short time, and will retain his fortune. Naomi is loath to accept Jordan’s failures and refuses his advances, but he forces himself upon her and she orders him to have sex as if it was their final encounter. When Jordan satisfies himself, Naomi announces her plan for divorce, with full custody of Skylar and their second child. Outraged, Jordan retrieves a stash of cocaine hidden in his sofa, breaks his sobriety, and collects young Skylar from her bedroom. As Naomi struggles to defend the child, Jordan beats his wife, forces Skylar into his Mercedes, and reverses the vehicle into a wall, but he and the girl are physically unharmed. In the morning, Jordan awakens to an empty bed, and his maid announces visitors. Agent Denham wields the illicit warning note that Jordan gave Donnie the day before, revealing that Donnie was also in cahoots with the FBI, but failed to offer Jordan the same caution. Betrayed by his best friend, and deprived of his family, Jordan finally capitulates to the FBI, and a raid at Stratton Oakmont ensues. After serving twenty-two months of his three-year sentence in a Nevada prison, Jordan continues his career as a motivational speaker, challenging audiences to invent spontaneous sales pitches for a simple writing pen. +

In 1987 New York City, newlywed Jordan Belfort, an aspiring millionaire, arrives for his first day of work at a Wall Street stock brokerage firm, only to learn that he will be relegated to transferring telephone calls. However, executive Mark Hanna takes a liking to the boy and invites him to lunch, where he advises Jordan to be ruthless, and to stoke his insatiable greed with sex and cocaine. Jordan follows orders, earns his brokerage license, and is soon promoted, but he loses his job on 19 October 1987, Black Monday, when international stock markets crash and the firm is forced to close. Jordan scours classified advertisements for work, convinced that he has no future as a stockbroker, but his wife, Teresa Petrillo, points out a listing for an “Investor Center” in Long Island. There, Jordan discovers a rudimentary boiler room of charlatans, selling “penny stock” investments to gullible Americans of modest means. Delighted to learn of the brokers’ fifty percent commission, Jordan uses his oratory skills and aggressive salesmanship to amass a fortune. He is befriended by a crude but ambitious neighbor named Donnie Azoff, and they establish their own firm, hiring Donnie’s drug-dealer friends as brokers. Jordan coaches the rogues to be effective salesmen, challenging them to sell him a writing pen, but they lack charisma, and are incapable of transforming a mundane tool into an object of desire. Business falters until Jordan changes the name of the firm to “Stratton Oakmont,” declaring that consumer trust is the key to securing investments. Following Jordan’s dictates, Stratton Oakmont grows into a billion dollar company by skimming large commissions from faulty investments and “pump and dump” schemes, where inexpensive stock prices are artificially inflated. Jordan hires his father, “Mad” Max Belfort, to add integrity to the operation while fueling his employees’ money lust with drugs and decadent orgies. With his own voracity for sex, cocaine, and Quaaludes, Jordan becomes increasingly frenzied and adulterous. Hosting one of many parties at his Long Island mansion, Jordan meets a young blonde named Naomi Lapaglia and becomes intent on possessing her, but she is covetous of his fortune and offers herself freely. When Jordan’s wife, Teresa, finds him snorting cocaine from Naomi’s breasts in his limousine, he is unable to deny his love for his mistress, and soon files for divorce. After proposing to Naomi and throwing himself a $2 million bachelor party, Jordan hosts a raucous wedding in the Bahamas, where he meets Naomi’s favorite aunt, a Londoner named Emma. The Belforts acquire an even larger mansion, have a daughter, Skylar, and continue their debauchery, but Naomi is displeased by Jordan’s infidelity and taunts him with her sexuality. Meanwhile, FBI agent Patrick Denham investigates Stratton Oakmont, hoping to combat Wall Street securities fraud operations. With the encouragement of his lawyer, Jordan and his cronies, including Donnie, ingest copious amounts of drugs and travel to Switzerland, where they meet banker Jean Jacques Saurel to open an account that is sheltered from U.S. law and FBI inquisition. When Jordan learns that the account must be established in the name of a non-American, he flies to London, England, and convinces Naomi’s aunt, Emma, to lend her identity. Although Emma successfully smuggles cash into Switzerland inside her luggage, Jordan and Donnie’s cash on hand is so enormous that he is forced to recruit other European smugglers, including the girl friend of Brad Bodnick, one of Stratton Oakmont’s first outlaw associates. As hostilities over the cash transactions intensify between Donnie and Brad, the men argue in a shopping mall parking lot and Brad is arrested. That evening, Donnie brings Jordan rare and potent “Lemmon” Quaaludes, hoping to appease his companion before he learns about Brad’s detainment. When the first pill does not take effect, the men swallow increasing numbers of the capsules, and Jordan receives a telephone call from his lawyer, ordering him to call back from a payphone. Still sober, Jordan drives his Ferrari to a nearby country club and phones the attorney, who reports Brad’s arrest and warns Jordan that his home is now under surveillance. Just then, the Quaaludes take effect, and Jordan is neither able to talk nor walk. After dragging himself back to the Ferrari, he receives a car phone call from Naomi, who complains that Donnie is intoxicated and making illogical transactions over the phone with Saurel, the Swiss banker. Fearing Donnie’s conversation will provide evidence to the FBI, Jordan navigates home in a drug-induced stupor and disconnects his friend from the telephone. Just then, Donnie chokes on a piece of deli meat. Jordan struggles to remain conscious, resuscitates himself with cocaine, and performs the Heimlich maneuver to save his partner. Sometime later, in an effort to withdraw from FBI surveillance, the two men take their wives to Italy on the Naomi, a yacht Jordan purchased for his wife as a wedding present. There, they learn that Aunt Emma died, and Jordan is wrought with anxiety about the multi-million dollar Swiss bank account in her name. Despite the yacht captain’s warning of a pending storm, Jordan orders the Naomi to head for Monaco, so he can get to Switzerland without delay. That night, the yacht encounters perilous waves. Although all on board are saved, the Naomi sinks, and the airplane that Jordan charters for Switzerland explodes just before landing to collect him, killing three people. The collective near-death experiences inspire Jordan to become sober, and he establishes a “self-help” financial coaching service, pledging to make other people rich. During the filming of an infomercial, Jordan is arrested by Agent Denham; Jordan’s Swiss banker, Saurel, revealed evidence against Stratton Oakmont to the FBI when he was exposed for participation in another scheme. Although Jordan pays bail, he is disheartened by his home detention, and hopes to minimize his impending prison sentence by cooperating with the FBI and wearing a wiretap to incriminate his associates. During his next encounter with Donnie, however, Jordan secretly passes his friend a note, warning him that he is under surveillance. That evening, Jordan appeals to Naomi for sex, assuring her that he will only be in prison a short time, and will retain his fortune. Naomi is loath to accept Jordan’s failures and refuses his advances, but he forces himself upon her and she orders him to have sex as if it was their final encounter. When Jordan satisfies himself, Naomi announces her plan for divorce, with full custody of Skylar and their second child. Outraged, Jordan retrieves a stash of cocaine hidden in his sofa, breaks his sobriety, and collects young Skylar from her bedroom. As Naomi struggles to defend the child, Jordan beats his wife, forces Skylar into his Mercedes, and reverses the vehicle into a wall, but he and the girl are physically unharmed. In the morning, Jordan awakens to an empty bed, and his maid announces visitors. Agent Denham wields the illicit warning note that Jordan gave Donnie the day before, revealing that Donnie was also in cahoots with the FBI, but failed to offer Jordan the same caution. Betrayed by his best friend, and deprived of his family, Jordan finally capitulates to the FBI, and a raid at Stratton Oakmont ensues. After serving twenty-two months of this three-year sentence in a Nevada prison, Jordan continues his career as a motivational speaker, challenging audiences to invent spontaneous sales pitches for a simple writing pen. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.