Sinners in the Sun (1932)

69-70 mins | Romance | 13 May 1932

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HISTORY

The working title for this film was The Beachcomber. William C. de Mille directed this film for the first two weeks of shooting, but according to a 23 Feb 1932 HR news item, conditions were not to his liking and he walked off the set. LAHE reported on 22 Feb 1932 that de Mille took the job reluctantly because Paramount needed a director, but as the shooting progressed, he decided David Burton would be better suited to handle the "wild, jazzy stuff." Var reported on 23 Feb 1932 that William Schorr was to "stage the dialogue," but no evidence that he worked on the production has been found. By 9 Mar 1932, HR announced that the story had to be rewritten, that much of the early scenes had to be reshot, and that the shooting would require eight weeks instead of the scheduled three to four. It is not known if any of de Mille's footage was used in the final film. Although Paramount had announced David Burton as the replacement director and he was listed as director in an ad in FD on 24 Mar 1932, Alexander Hall actually did the job. The MPH and Var reviews credit Vincent Lawrence along with Waldemar Young and Samuel Hoffenstein with screenplay. Actress Theresa Harris was identified in a production still from the film, but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. ...

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The working title for this film was The Beachcomber. William C. de Mille directed this film for the first two weeks of shooting, but according to a 23 Feb 1932 HR news item, conditions were not to his liking and he walked off the set. LAHE reported on 22 Feb 1932 that de Mille took the job reluctantly because Paramount needed a director, but as the shooting progressed, he decided David Burton would be better suited to handle the "wild, jazzy stuff." Var reported on 23 Feb 1932 that William Schorr was to "stage the dialogue," but no evidence that he worked on the production has been found. By 9 Mar 1932, HR announced that the story had to be rewritten, that much of the early scenes had to be reshot, and that the shooting would require eight weeks instead of the scheduled three to four. It is not known if any of de Mille's footage was used in the final film. Although Paramount had announced David Burton as the replacement director and he was listed as director in an ad in FD on 24 Mar 1932, Alexander Hall actually did the job. The MPH and Var reviews credit Vincent Lawrence along with Waldemar Young and Samuel Hoffenstein with screenplay. Actress Theresa Harris was identified in a production still from the film, but her appearance in the released film has not been confirmed.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
14 Feb 1932
p. 4
Film Daily
24 Mar 1932
pp. 14-15
Film Daily
8 May 1932
p. 4
Film Daily
15 May 1932
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
9 Feb 1932
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
23 Feb 1932
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
9-Mar-32
---
Los Angeles Herald Express
22-Feb-32
---
Motion Picture Herald
21 May 1932
p. 102
New York Times
21-Feb-32
---
New York Times
14 May 1932
p. 11
Variety
23-Feb-32
---
Variety
17 May 1932
p. 15
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Beachcomber
Release Date:
13 May 1932
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Publix Corp.
12 May 1932
LP3029
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
69-70
Length(in feet):
6,251
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Doris Blake models clothes for New York's society women. When her car mechanic boyfriend, Jimmie Martin, proposes, Doris insists they wait to marry until they have more money, refusing to live as her family does, unambitious and in a crowded house without privacy. Angry that Doris believes he has no ambition, Jimmie takes a job as chauffeur for millionaire Claire Kinkaid, who has all the luxuries of life except a man to love. At a fashion show on Long Island, Doris, meanwhile, meets wealthy playboy Eric Nelson, who is soon to be divorced. When Doris spends a series of late nights with Eric, her father kicks her out, then tells Jimmie she is running around with a married man. Angry and hurt, Jimmie marries Claire, although both of them know he still loves Doris. Eric and Doris, meanwhile, drink and gamble in high society. One night, Doris' friend, Lil, who loves handsome playboy Ridgeway, kills herself when she realizes he will never love, much less marry, her. Later at a party, Jimmie meets a young fortune hunter who is married to an older, rich woman, who calls Jimmie a gigolo. Jimmie leaves in anger and runs into Doris, whom he insults, telling her, "You know what you are." When Ridgeway tells Doris that Eric has left for Europe with his wife but has left her a check, she leaves for Santa Barbara, CA. Sorry for the way he treated Doris, Jimmie parts amicably from Claire. Doris, meanwhile, has taken a job with a dressmaker in Santa Barbara. Eric tracks her there and tells her that he divorced in Paris and wants to marry ...

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Doris Blake models clothes for New York's society women. When her car mechanic boyfriend, Jimmie Martin, proposes, Doris insists they wait to marry until they have more money, refusing to live as her family does, unambitious and in a crowded house without privacy. Angry that Doris believes he has no ambition, Jimmie takes a job as chauffeur for millionaire Claire Kinkaid, who has all the luxuries of life except a man to love. At a fashion show on Long Island, Doris, meanwhile, meets wealthy playboy Eric Nelson, who is soon to be divorced. When Doris spends a series of late nights with Eric, her father kicks her out, then tells Jimmie she is running around with a married man. Angry and hurt, Jimmie marries Claire, although both of them know he still loves Doris. Eric and Doris, meanwhile, drink and gamble in high society. One night, Doris' friend, Lil, who loves handsome playboy Ridgeway, kills herself when she realizes he will never love, much less marry, her. Later at a party, Jimmie meets a young fortune hunter who is married to an older, rich woman, who calls Jimmie a gigolo. Jimmie leaves in anger and runs into Doris, whom he insults, telling her, "You know what you are." When Ridgeway tells Doris that Eric has left for Europe with his wife but has left her a check, she leaves for Santa Barbara, CA. Sorry for the way he treated Doris, Jimmie parts amicably from Claire. Doris, meanwhile, has taken a job with a dressmaker in Santa Barbara. Eric tracks her there and tells her that he divorced in Paris and wants to marry her. She refuses his proposal, then finds him trying to sell a car to her boss. Later they meet in the elevator, swear their love and kiss.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.