Swing Shift Maisie (1943)

87 mins | Comedy | 1943

Director:

Norman Z. McLeod

Producer:

George Haight

Cinematographer:

Harry Stradling

Editor:

Elmo Veron

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Swing It, Maisie. According to Oct 1942 HR news items, Jim Davis was originally cast in the role of "Breezy," but was replaced by James Craig in Dec 1942 and placed in a bit role. Monte Lee is listed in HR as a cast member, but his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. For more information on the "Maisie" series, consult the Series Index and see entry for Maisie in the AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.2662. ...

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The working title of this film was Swing It, Maisie. According to Oct 1942 HR news items, Jim Davis was originally cast in the role of "Breezy," but was replaced by James Craig in Dec 1942 and placed in a bit role. Monte Lee is listed in HR as a cast member, but his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. For more information on the "Maisie" series, consult the Series Index and see entry for Maisie in the AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.2662.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 May 1943
---
Daily Variety
5 May 1943
p. 3
Film Daily
10 May 1943
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
22 Sep 1942
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
29 Oct 1942
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 1942
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
22 Dec 1942
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
24 Dec 1942
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 1943
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 1943
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 1943
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 1943
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
13 Sep 1943
p. 8
Motion Picture Herald
8 May 1943
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Mar 1943
p. 1191
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 May 1943
p. 1302
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
18 Sep 1943
pp. 1546-47
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Nov 1943
p. 1617
New York Times
10 Sep 1943
p. 29
Variety
5 May 1943
p. 16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Assoc
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
STAND INS
Acrobatic double for Jean Rogers
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Wilson Collison.
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"There's a Girl Behind the Boy Behind the Gun," words and music by Lennie Hayton and Mary C. McCall, Jr.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Swing It, Maisie
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 9 Sep 1943
Production Date:
21 Dec 1942--3 Feb 1943
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
6 May 1943
LP12079
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
87
Length(in feet):
7,757
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9150
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

After learning that his boss at Los Angeles' Victory Aircraft has convinced the War Department to reject his flyer's commission, test pilot Brian B. "Breezy" McLaughlin makes an angry phone call while dining at the Propellor Club. Breezy's loud conversation annoys entertainer Maisie Ravier, who is onstage, trying to coax partner Horatio Curley's trained dogs to perform tricks. Breezy then drops his steak on the floor, prompting all of the dogs to abandon the stage. The hungry dogs fight over the meat, and chaos ensues. Later, Breezy, Horatio and Maisie appear before a judge, who rules that, as long as Breezy is willing to help Horatio get a job at Victory, all charges against them will be dropped. Although Horatio is excited about his new job, he expresses concern for Maisie, who joined his act back East in order to travel to California and become a defense plant worker. When Breezy insinuates that sexy Maisie is ill-suited to factory work, Maisie vows to prove him wrong. The next day, Maisie passes the factory's application test, but is in danger of losing her chance because she has no birth certificate. Anxious to help his former partner, Horatio signs an affidavit on her behalf, stating falsely that he has known Maisie since childhood. Maisie is hired for the plant's swing shift, and impressed by her determination, Breezy helps her secure a room at Maw Lustvogel's crowded boardinghouse. As part of her deal with Maw, Maisie agrees to take a roommate, and consequently, when she discovers her distraught neighbor, Iris Reed, apparently trying to kill herself, Maisie suggests that Iris move in with her. ...

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After learning that his boss at Los Angeles' Victory Aircraft has convinced the War Department to reject his flyer's commission, test pilot Brian B. "Breezy" McLaughlin makes an angry phone call while dining at the Propellor Club. Breezy's loud conversation annoys entertainer Maisie Ravier, who is onstage, trying to coax partner Horatio Curley's trained dogs to perform tricks. Breezy then drops his steak on the floor, prompting all of the dogs to abandon the stage. The hungry dogs fight over the meat, and chaos ensues. Later, Breezy, Horatio and Maisie appear before a judge, who rules that, as long as Breezy is willing to help Horatio get a job at Victory, all charges against them will be dropped. Although Horatio is excited about his new job, he expresses concern for Maisie, who joined his act back East in order to travel to California and become a defense plant worker. When Breezy insinuates that sexy Maisie is ill-suited to factory work, Maisie vows to prove him wrong. The next day, Maisie passes the factory's application test, but is in danger of losing her chance because she has no birth certificate. Anxious to help his former partner, Horatio signs an affidavit on her behalf, stating falsely that he has known Maisie since childhood. Maisie is hired for the plant's swing shift, and impressed by her determination, Breezy helps her secure a room at Maw Lustvogel's crowded boardinghouse. As part of her deal with Maw, Maisie agrees to take a roommate, and consequently, when she discovers her distraught neighbor, Iris Reed, apparently trying to kill herself, Maisie suggests that Iris move in with her. Iris, a failed actress, protests that she is broke, but Maisie assures her that she can find work at Victory. Maisie then begs Breezy to invite her new roommate along on their first date. Breezy at first refuses, but when he catches a glimpse of the attractive Iris, he changes his mind, and the threesome enjoy an evening of bowling together. The next morning, as Iris hunts for her own birth certificate, Maisie reveals how she tricked her way into her job. Iris is hired at the plant, but unlike Maisie, has trouble learning her assigned tasks. Seeing Iris exhausted, Maisie insists that she stay home instead of accompanying her on a date with Breezy. Breezy makes another date with Iris, then is forced to cancel his plans with Maisie because of work. By the end of their next date, Breezy and Iris have fallen in love and are engaged. Breezy then learns that his commission has come through and tells a stunned Maisie that he and Iris are marrying as soon as his training is over. Although Maisie wishes the couple well and promises to take care of Iris during Breezy's absence, she is heartbroken. Taking her vow to heart, Maisie enrolls Iris in every club at the plant, but is dismayed to discover that her roommate is a shameless flirt. Maisie is even forced to ask her acrobat friends, the German Schmitt Brothers, to tie up Iris "like a pretzel" to keep her from going out with a stranger. Later, Iris is fired for flaunting the plant's safety rules and causing an accident. Seeing an opportunity to rid herself of Maisie, Iris calls Breezy at his camp and asks that he wire her money, then makes a date with Judd Evans, a womanizing clerk. After a seemingly distressed Iris tells Maisie that, because she is broke, she is moving out, she leaves with Judd. Maisie finally deduces Iris' duplicity when Breezy calls the boardinghouse and reveals that he wired Iris one hundred dollars. Determined to prevent Iris from further hoodwinking Breezy, Maisie finds her at Judd's apartment and threatens to expose her infidelities unless she breaks her engagement to Breezy, who is planning to fly to Los Angeles the next morning on a one-day leave and marry Iris in Arizona. Although Iris agrees to Maisie's demands, the next morning she notifies the plant authorities about Maisie's application lie. While Maisie is taken in for questioning, Iris meets Breezy at the airport as planned and heads for Arizona with him. Unable to convince the investigators that she is not a saboteur, Maisie decides to implicate Iris and Breezy as her Nazi accomplices so that they will be stopped by the police. When the police tell a confused Breezy about Maisie's accusation, Breezy insists on returning to Los Angeles to help her. Iris' cold indifference to Maisie shocks Breezy, and he breaks their engagement. Once cleared of all charges, Maisie settles the score with Iris, who ends up with a trash can on her head. Despite Breezy's apologies and confession of love, Maisie refuses to marry him. Later, however, Maisie confesses to a group of pilots who have come to the boardinghouse that she is in love with another pilot and is delighted when Breezy pops up to embrace her.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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