Nightcrawler (2014)

R | 117 mins | Drama | 31 October 2014

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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Director:

Dan Gilroy

Writer:

Dan Gilroy

Cinematographer:

Robert Elswit

Editor:

John Gilroy

Production Designer:

Kevin Kavanaugh

Production Company:

Bold Films
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HISTORY

End credits include the following statements: “‘The Court Jester’ courtesy of Paramount Pictures; The Producers would like to thank the following: The state of California and the California Film Commission; KCBS-2; KTLA-5; KCAL-9; Alexis Mantis; Jonny Block; Robert Chartier; Debbie J. Adams; Dell Inc.; Brooks Brothers; Debra Hurd; Darren Shearer; Kevin Bolyard; Cyril O’Neal; Sony; Film LA; Naida Albright; Matt Malm; Mike Bertolina; Frank Isaac; Saba Larimer; and, “Filmed on location in Los Angeles, CA.”
       A brief in the 23-29 Apr 2013 Var announced that Jake Gyllenhaal would star in Nightcrawler. Writer Dan Gilroy was attached to make his directorial debut, and Gilroy’s wife, Rene Russo, was set to co-star. Dan Gilroy’s brother, Tony Gilroy, was on board to produce, and their brother John Gilroy edited.
       Writer-director Dan Gilroy worked as a film reporter and critic for Var in the mid-1980s, as noted in a 24 Oct 2014 WSJ article, and became interested in Los Angeles, CA, television news, which incorporated more “graphic images” than newscasts in other cities. Dan Gilroy also took inspiration from Arthur Fellig, otherwise known as “Weegee,” a news photographer based in New York City who was famous for “chasing emergency calls” and obtaining “stark and timely” photographs, as stated in a 4 Sep 2014 NYT article. According to the 12 Nov 2014 LAT, Dan Gilroy had written the script several years before and sent it to a Los Angeles-based stringer, or “nightcrawler,” named Howard Raishbrook, who came on board as a technical advisor, along with his brother, Austin. The Raishbrooks, who own RMG News with their brother, Marc, worked ... More Less

End credits include the following statements: “‘The Court Jester’ courtesy of Paramount Pictures; The Producers would like to thank the following: The state of California and the California Film Commission; KCBS-2; KTLA-5; KCAL-9; Alexis Mantis; Jonny Block; Robert Chartier; Debbie J. Adams; Dell Inc.; Brooks Brothers; Debra Hurd; Darren Shearer; Kevin Bolyard; Cyril O’Neal; Sony; Film LA; Naida Albright; Matt Malm; Mike Bertolina; Frank Isaac; Saba Larimer; and, “Filmed on location in Los Angeles, CA.”
       A brief in the 23-29 Apr 2013 Var announced that Jake Gyllenhaal would star in Nightcrawler. Writer Dan Gilroy was attached to make his directorial debut, and Gilroy’s wife, Rene Russo, was set to co-star. Dan Gilroy’s brother, Tony Gilroy, was on board to produce, and their brother John Gilroy edited.
       Writer-director Dan Gilroy worked as a film reporter and critic for Var in the mid-1980s, as noted in a 24 Oct 2014 WSJ article, and became interested in Los Angeles, CA, television news, which incorporated more “graphic images” than newscasts in other cities. Dan Gilroy also took inspiration from Arthur Fellig, otherwise known as “Weegee,” a news photographer based in New York City who was famous for “chasing emergency calls” and obtaining “stark and timely” photographs, as stated in a 4 Sep 2014 NYT article. According to the 12 Nov 2014 LAT, Dan Gilroy had written the script several years before and sent it to a Los Angeles-based stringer, or “nightcrawler,” named Howard Raishbrook, who came on board as a technical advisor, along with his brother, Austin. The Raishbrooks, who own RMG News with their brother, Marc, worked with Gilroy to ensure the story’s authenticity, but claimed that unlike the character “Louis Bloom,” they would never make an exclusive deal with a news station, nor do they visit news stations in person.
       Jake Gyllenhaal lost thirty pounds for the role of Louis Bloom, as noted in the 24 Oct 2014 WSJ. He also went on a ride-along with the Raishbrooks, as stated in the 12 Nov 2014 LAT, in preparation for the role. Gyllenhaal stated that he modeled his character after a hungry coyote that descends upon the city to feed at night.
       The budget was cited as $8.5 million in the 26 Oct 2014 and 3 Nov 2014 issues of LAT. However, a 13 Nov 2014 LAT article later stated the film cost $7 million. Bold Films provided financing, and, according to a 19 Sep 2013 Var item, filmmakers received a $2.3 million tax credit from the California Film Tax Credit program.
       Principal photography began 6 Oct 2013, as stated in the 19 Sep 2013 Var. Various contemporary sources reported different shooting schedules: a 28 Oct 2014 Var item stated that filming lasted twenty-six days and took place in forty locations across Los Angeles; the 7 Sep 2014 LAT reported a twenty-nine day shooting schedule, including twenty-two consecutive night shoots, at over seventy locations; a 26 Oct 2014 LAT item cited a twenty-seven day schedule; and, the 13 Nov 2014 LAT stated that filming lasted only twenty-five days. The downtown Los Angeles area was avoided in favor of suburban locations.
       The 28 Oct 2014 Var reported that cinematographer Robert Elswit filmed night scenes using an Arri Alexa digital camera, while day scenes were shot with a 35mm film camera. Elswit noted that quick lighting setups afforded Dan Gilroy more time with the actors, and the Arri Alexa’s exposure range allowed him to light the foreground of night scenes, while the background “almost took care of itself.”
       The 19 May 2014 issue of Var announced that Open Road Films acquired U.S. distribution rights. The world premiere took place 5 Sep 2014 at the Toronto Film Festival, according to a 7 Sep 2014 LAT item. While theatrical release was originally scheduled for 17 Oct 2014, the date was pushed back to 31 Oct 2014, as noted in a 19 Aug 2014 Var news brief. In its opening weekend, the film took in $10.4 million in box-office receipts, slightly less than box-office leader Ouija (2014, see entry), which grossed $10.7 million according to a 4 Nov 2014 LAT brief.
       Critical reception was mixed. Although the 31 Oct 2014 NYT and 6 Sep 2014 Var reviews complained that the film’s critique of news media was “shopworn,” the 31 Oct 2014 LAT review described Gyllenhaal’s performance as “remarkable.” Gyllenhaal was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama. The film was named one of AFI’s Movies of the Year, and one of the Top Ten Films of 2014 by the National Board of Review. It received an Academy Award nomination for Writing (Original Screenplay). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
31 Oct 2014
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Oct-7 Nov 2014
p. 68.
Los Angeles Times
7 Sep 2014
Section D, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
26 Oct 2014
Section D, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
31 Oct 2014
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
3 Nov 2014
Section D, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
12 Nov 2014
Section D, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
13 Nov 2014
Section S, p. 6.
New York Times
31 Oct 2014
Section C, p. 10.
New York Times
4 Sep 2014
Section C, p. 1.
Variety
23-29 Apr 2013.
---
Variety
19 May 2014
p. 13.
Variety
19 Aug 2014.
---
Variety
6 Sep 2014.
---
Variety
28 Oct 2014.
---
Village Voice
29 Oct 2014.
---
WSJ
24 Oct 2014
Section D, p. 5.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Open Road Films and Bold Films Present
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d unit dir
1st asst dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
Addl 2d asst dir, 2d unit
2d 2d asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, Addl photog
2d asst dir, Addl photog
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod, Bold Films
Assoc prod, Bold Films
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Steadicam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Digital imaging tech
Best boy elec
Set lighting tech
Set lighting tech
Set lighting tech
Set lighting tech
Key grip
Best boy grip
A-dolly grip
A-dolly grip
B-dolly grip
B-dolly grip
Grip
Playback footage coord
Still photog
Video playback
Video playback
Video playback
Rigging gaffer
Best boy rigging elec
Best boy rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Key rigging grip
Best boy rigging grip
Set prod asst
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Cam op - "A Camera," 2d unit
1st asst cam -"A Camera," 2d unit
2d asst cam - "A Camera," 2d unit
Cam op - "B Camera," 2d unit
1st asst cam -"B Camera," 2d unit
2d asst cam - "B Camera," 2d unit
Cam op - "C Camera," 2d unit
1st asst cam -"C Camera," 2d unit
2d asst cam - "C Camera," 2d unit
Cam prod asst, 2d unit
Gaffer, 2d unit
Set lighting tech, 2d unit
Set lighting tech, 2d unit
Set lighting tech, 2d unit
Set lighting tech, 2d unit
Key grip, 2d unit
Best boy grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Grip, 2d unit
Crane op, 2d unit
Dir of photog, Addl photog
TV set lighting, Addl photog
Video controller, Addl photog
Cam op, Addl photog
Cam op, Addl photog
Gaffer, Addl photog
Key grip, Addl photog
Alexa & film cameras
Addl cameras
Lighting equip
Grip equip
Video playback services
Film laboratory
Video dailies
Dailies viewing system
Captured with
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
Storyboard artist
Art dept prod asst
Art consultant
Picture vehicle wraps and fabrication
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed/VFX ed
Asst ed
AVID ediing systems
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Prop prod asst
Leadman
On set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Const coord
General foreman
Labor foreman
Propmaker
Propmaker
Paint foreman
Standby painter
Const prod asst
Prop master, 2d unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Key costumer
On set costumer
Costume prod asst
Costumer, 2d unit
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus supv
Exec in charge of mus, Bold Films
Score prod by
Mus ed
Addl mus by
Addl mus by
Synth programming
Mus performed by
Orch cond by
Clarinet soloist
Orchestra contractor
Auricle control systems
Auricle control systems
Mus librarian
Mus preparation
Joann Kane Music Service
Scoring eng
Score mixed by
Addl rec by
Mix asst
Scoring coord
Scoring crew
Scoring crew
SOUND
Sd supv and des
Supv dial and ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Sd utility
Prod sd mixer, 2d unit
Boom op, 2d unit
1st asst sd ed, Addl photog
Dial asst ed, Addl photog
Sd FX ed, Addl photog
Sd FX ed, Addl photog
Sd FX ed, Addl photog
Dial ed, Addl photog
Dial ed, Addl photog
Foley ed, Addl photog
Foley artist, Addl photog
Foley artist, Addl photog
Foley artist, Addl photog
Foley mixer, Addl photog
Foley mixer, Addl photog
Foley rec, Addl photog
Foley rec, Addl photog
Sd ed provided by, Addl photog
Re-rec mix tech, Addl photog
Mixing services provided by, Addl photog
ADR mixer, Addl photog
ADR loop group, Addl photog
Voice
Voice
Voice
Voice
Voice
Voice
Voice
Voice
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Spec eff coord
Screen graphics supv
Screen graphics animator
Main title images provided by
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Spec eff prod asst
Visual eff by
Visual eff supv
Visual eff prod
Compositing supv
Compositing lead
Compositor
Addl VFX
Visual eff supv, Rain VFX
Visual eff exec prod, Rain VFX
Visual eff line prod, Rain VFX
Addl VFX
Visual eff prod, Artea
Compositor, Artea
Compositor, Artea
Compositor, Artea
Artist, Artea
MAKEUP
Dept head make-up
Key make-up artist
Dept head hair
Key hair stylist
Hair stylist
Hair stylist
Key makeup, Addl photog
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting by
Scr supv
Digital utility
Prod supv
Post prod supv
Post prod asst
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
Payroll accountant
Accounting clerk
Accounting clerk
Post prod accounting by
Post prod accountant
Prod coord
Prod secy
Prod consultant
Consulting services provided by
Consulting services provided by
Consulting services provided by
Consulting services provided by
LAPD tech advisor
LAPD tech advisor
Clearance coord
Scr clearances
Casting assoc
Casting consultant
Extras casting
Unit pub
Loc mgr
Key asst loc mgr
Key asst loc mgr
Key asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc scout
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Asst to Mr. Dan Gilroy
Asst to Mr. Gyllenhaal
Asst to Mr. Ahmed
Craft service
Asst craft service
Chef
Asst chef
Asst chef
Asst chef
Medic
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Picture car coord
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Mechanic
Mechanic
Arm car asst, 2d unit
Digital utility, 2d unit
Scr supv, 2d unit
Medic, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Set prod asst, 2d unit
Teleprompter, Addl photog
Business affairs exec, Bold Films
Prod attorney, Bold Films
Prod finance exec, Bold Films
Controller, Bold Films
Asst to Mr. Lancaster, Bold Films
Asst to Mr. Walters, Bold Films
Office asst, Bold Films
Office asst, Bold Films
Production insurance broker
Payroll services
Extras prayroll services
EPK
Bond company
Prod legal
Prod financing provided by
Santa Monica community mural
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Asst stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Digital Intermediate provided by
CO3 exec prod/Supv colorist
DI colorist
Digital conform
DI technologist
Col asst
Head of prod, DI
Account exec, DI
SOURCES
SONGS
“How News Punch,” written by Marc Oliver Vickers, courtesy of APM Music
“City of Angels (FEAT. C Plus),” written by Jarred MacGill and James “Jpax Akrasia” Paxton, performed by All in a Jayswork, courtesy of All in a Jayswork
“Wild Card,” written by Buddy and Julie Miller, performed by Buddy Miller, courtesy of Shout! Factory
+
SONGS
“How News Punch,” written by Marc Oliver Vickers, courtesy of APM Music
“City of Angels (FEAT. C Plus),” written by Jarred MacGill and James “Jpax Akrasia” Paxton, performed by All in a Jayswork, courtesy of All in a Jayswork
“Wild Card,” written by Buddy and Julie Miller, performed by Buddy Miller, courtesy of Shout! Factory
“Patrona De Los Reclusos,” written by Enrique Bonfante, performed by The Latin Brothers, courtesy of Miami Records, Inc., by arrangement with Ocean Park Music Group
“Breaking News,” written by Dave Hewson and Johnny Pearson, courtesy of APM Music
“Headline Story, written by Aaron Frederick Laszlo Wheeler, courtesy of APM Music
“Honky Tonk Hoe Down,” written by Richard Myhill, courtesy of APM Music
“Mr. Jolly,” written by Ozgur Salur, courtesy of APM Music
“Blam,” written by Glyn Michael Owen, courtesy of APM Music
“Our Changing World,” written by Dave Hewson, courtesy of APM Music
“We’ve Got The Choice,” written by Cathy Baxter, courtesy of APM Music
“Metro Fanfare, written by Bella Russell and Nigel Peter Beaham-Powell, courtesy of APM Music
“The Joust – Part 1,” written by Victor Shoen, from the motion picture “The Court Jester,” courtesy of Dena’s Trust and Paramount Pictures
“Eliminate The Night,” written by Joan Osborne, performed by Joan Osborne, courtesy of Direct Holdings America, Inc
“Doubt Me,” written by Jared MacGill and James “Jpax Akrasia” Paxton, performed by All in a Jayswork, courtesy of All in a Jayswork
“Business Profile,” written by Matthew Cang, courtesy of APM Music
“Look At The Price,” written by Cathy Baxter, courtesy of APM Music
“The Beach Land,” written and performed by The Sadies, courtesy of Yep Roc Records, by arrangement with Ocean Park Music Group
“News Brief,” written by Warren Bennett, courtesy of APM Music
“La Marcha De Zacatecas,” traditional, performed by Gran Mariachi Ordaz, courtesy of Multimusic S.A dec C.V. “Estrellita,” written by Manuel M. Ponce, performed by Cecilio Perera, courtesy of Mixdown Records
“Here Is The News,” written by Oliver James Vassey, courtesy of APM Music
“News Roundup,” written by Charles Riba and Nigel M. Squires, courtesy of APM Music
“Bargains Here For You,” written by Cathy Baxter, courtesy of APM Music
“Lullaby Box, written by Leo Nissim, courtesy of APM Music
“Regional Report,” written by David John Arnold and Bruce Upchurch, courtesy of APM Music
“Kind Of Magic,” written by Blair Booth, courtesy of APM Music
“Current Report,” written by Alan Bell and Roger Stephen Dexter, courtesy of APM Music
“Welcome Back,” written by Jonathan Paul Hodge, courtesy of APM Music
“Primetime News,” written by Anselm C. Kreuzer, courtesy of APM Music.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 October 2014
Premiere Information:
Toronto Film Festival premiere: 5 September 2014
Los Angeles and New York openings: 31 October 2014
Production Date:
6 October--early November 2013
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby® Digital in selected theatres; Datasat Digital Sound in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision Cameras and Lenses
Duration(in mins):
117
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
49147
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, Louis Bloom knocks out a security guard who catches him trespassing. Later, he sells stolen chain-link fencing, copper wire, and manhole covers to a scrap yard owner. Louis asks for a job, but the prospective employer refuses to hire a thief. Louis uses an application on his phone to arrange a date with an older, married woman. Although he tries to share a meal with her, she says she only has thirty minutes and asks to have rough sex in her car. On the way home, he stops at the site of a car accident and watches as Joe Loder, a freelance cameraman, films the victim being pulled out of her car. Louis asks Loder if his footage will appear on television, and the cameraman says, “If it bleeds, it leads.” The next day, Louis sees Loder’s footage on the morning news. At Venice Beach, he steals a bicycle and pawns it in exchange for a video camcorder and a police scanner, then sets out on the streets of Los Angeles to film crime and accident scenes. At the site of a carjacking, Louis approaches a shooting victim and police yell at him to stay back. Louis overhears another freelance cameraman negotiating a rate for footage of the same scene. Louis goes to television station KWLA-5 and introduces himself as “Lou Bloom.” He meets news director Nina Romina, who says she already has footage of the carjacking. Louis insists he got closer to the victim, and when Nina reviews his footage, she expresses interest despite assignment director Frank Kruse’s opinion that the video is too grisly. Nina says they will run the footage with a ... +


In Los Angeles, California, Louis Bloom knocks out a security guard who catches him trespassing. Later, he sells stolen chain-link fencing, copper wire, and manhole covers to a scrap yard owner. Louis asks for a job, but the prospective employer refuses to hire a thief. Louis uses an application on his phone to arrange a date with an older, married woman. Although he tries to share a meal with her, she says she only has thirty minutes and asks to have rough sex in her car. On the way home, he stops at the site of a car accident and watches as Joe Loder, a freelance cameraman, films the victim being pulled out of her car. Louis asks Loder if his footage will appear on television, and the cameraman says, “If it bleeds, it leads.” The next day, Louis sees Loder’s footage on the morning news. At Venice Beach, he steals a bicycle and pawns it in exchange for a video camcorder and a police scanner, then sets out on the streets of Los Angeles to film crime and accident scenes. At the site of a carjacking, Louis approaches a shooting victim and police yell at him to stay back. Louis overhears another freelance cameraman negotiating a rate for footage of the same scene. Louis goes to television station KWLA-5 and introduces himself as “Lou Bloom.” He meets news director Nina Romina, who says she already has footage of the carjacking. Louis insists he got closer to the victim, and when Nina reviews his footage, she expresses interest despite assignment director Frank Kruse’s opinion that the video is too grisly. Nina says they will run the footage with a warning, and link the crime to other recent carjackings. Louis asks for $1,000, but Nina will only pay $250. She tells him he has a good eye and suggests he buy a directional microphone for interviews. Nina also tips him off that KWLA viewers are more interested in crime in the suburbs, accidents, and “graphic” material. The next day, Louis’s footage airs. He studies police codes and places an advertisement for an assistant. An applicant named Rick meets him at a diner and reveals he is homeless, but has a cell phone and a driver’s license. Louis tells Rick the job is an unpaid internship, but Rick insists he must earn something, and Louis agrees to pay him thirty dollars per night. On their first outing, Louis frightens Rick with his reckless driving, and Rick fails to alert him about a turn on the way to a fire. They arrive at the scene after Joe Loder, who teases Louis about his camcorder. A shooting is announced over the police scanner, and Louis and Rick respond to the call. While police interview the unharmed victims outside, Louis sneaks inside their house and finds bullet holes in the refrigerator. He rearranges family photographs around the bullet holes and films them, then steals a piece of mail to identify the victims. Nina Romina likes the footage, but Frank Kruse argues it is intrusive. Nina wields her authority and dismisses Frank’s opinion, prompting Louis to congratulate her on how she “handled” Frank. Louis spouts information he learned from an online business course, and says television news is his new passion. He continues to sell his work to KWLA and uses the money to buy a flashy sports car. At a gas station, he yells at Rick for allowing gasoline to drip on the car’s paint job and threatens to fire him if it happens again. Later, Louis and Rick arrive first at the site of a car crash. Louis drags the bloodied victim along the ground in order to get a better camera angle and sneaks away when police arrive. At the television station, Nina congratulates him on his third leading story that week. She notices blood on his shirt, but Louis shrugs it off and asks her to dinner. Nina tells Louis she is twice his age and doesn’t want to mess up their working relationship, but Louis implies the relationship would only be harmed if she refuses him. Outside, Joe Loder approaches Louis, saying he is about to add a second van to his fleet and would like Louis to join his operation. Louis refuses, claiming that working for himself is more in line with his skills and career goals. Nina goes to dinner with Louis, who reveals that he is from the north end of the San Fernando Valley but no longer knows anyone there. Louis tells Nina he wants to start a relationship and “team up” with her. Nina responds that she only came to dinner as a professional courtesy, but Louis threatens that she could lose her job if he stops supplying her with footage of crime scenes. He reminds her that KWLA is the lowest-rated television station in Los Angeles, and claims he has single-handedly raised the value of their ratings book. Knowing Nina’s two-year contract is about to expire, Louis insinuates that it would be in her best interest to have sex with him. Later, Rick asks Louis for a raise, but Louis denies him. They arrive late at the site of a plane crash and Loder boasts he has already obtained exclusive footage. Nina chastises Louis for missing the action and reminds him it is “sweeps week,” a crucial time for television ratings. Soon after, Louis tinkers underneath Loder’s news van parked at his home, then sneaks away. That night, Louis and Rick respond to the scene of a car accident and find Loder’s van smashed into a pole. Rick discourages Louis from filming as Loder is pulled from the van, but Louis moves in for a close-up, alleging professional objectivity. Louis and Rick arrive at a domestic call in Granada Hills while a shooting is still in progress. Afraid, Rick stays in the car while Louis approaches the house and hides behind a bush. He films two gunmen as they flee, getting a clear shot of their faces and license plate. Inside, Louis shoots close-ups of three victims, one of whom is still alive. Louis and Rick flee as police sirens approach. At KWLA, Nina reviews the footage and asks her colleague, Linda, if they can legally air it. Linda says they will have to blur out the victims’ faces and withhold the address. Meanwhile, Frank insists it would be immoral to screen the footage. Louis and Nina negotiate a price, arriving at $15,000. Louis demands that his company name, Video Production News, be credited onscreen, and that Nina introduce him to everyone at the station. He also says Nina should allow him to do the things he wants to her when they are alone in her apartment, unlike the last time. Police detectives Fronteiri and Lieberman visit Louis at home and inquire about the Granada Hills crime scene. Louis claims he happened to hear gunshots and went inside to offer assistance. Fronteiri asks if he saw or filmed the suspects, but Louis states he only saw their dark SUV driving away and provides the detectives with an edited video. After they leave, Louis reviews the complete footage and finds the SUV’s license plate number, which he uses to identify one of the suspects. Louis gives Rick a promotion and tells him to name his new salary. Rick starts to ask for $100 per night, but reduces his request to $75. Louis tells Rick his plan to stake out the shooting suspects and follow them to a public place. There, he will call in their location for the $50,000 police reward, and film the arrest. Rick only agrees to help if they split the reward. They stake out a suspect’s house and follow his SUV as he picks up his accomplice. The men go to a fast-food restaurant, and Rick worries that restaurant patrons will be hurt if the arrest happens here. Louis ignores him and calls 911, then threatens to hurt Rick unless he leaves the car to film the action from the street. Louis shoots from inside the car as four policemen arrive. One of the suspects draws a gun, but is shot down by police. Restaurant patrons and the other suspect are shot, but the surviving suspect escapes in the SUV. Louis and Frank follow the high-speed police chase, which ends in a crash. Louis gets out of his car and peers inside the upturned SUV. He pronounces the driver dead and orders Rick to film a close-up. However, when Rick approaches the car, the suspect shoots him. Emerging from the car, the suspect ignores Louis, who is still filming, and approaches an oncoming police car. The suspect is shot down. Louis films a close-up of a dying Rick, and confesses that he could not jeopardize his company’s success for an untrustworthy employee. At KWLA, Nina views Louis’s footage and deems it amazing. Before it is aired, detectives Fronteiri and Lieberman arrive and attempt to seize the video, but Nina demands a judge’s order. Frank informs Nina that drugs were found in the Granada Hills house, but she does not want to report the information until the next day, insisting viewers care more about innocent victims. Frank accuses Nina of sounding like Louis, and she admits he has inspired her to reach higher. At the police station, Louis tells Fronteiri that the shooters staked out his house and followed him. He claims he made an evasive maneuver and reported their location to the police. Fronteiri does not believe him, and says he does not seem sad about his dead partner. Louis insists he was just doing his job. Sometime later, Louis stands by two news vans painted with his company’s logo and welcomes three unpaid interns, promising they will never be asked to do anything Louis wouldn’t do himself. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.