American Sniper (2014)

R | 134 mins | Drama | 25 December 2014

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HISTORY

The film ends with a title reading, “Chris Kyle was killed that day by a veteran he was trying to help.” Scenes from Kyle’s memorial are shown during end credits, which include acknowledgments to the State of California and the California Film Commission, and the following statements: “With the participation of the Province of British Columbia Production Services Tax Credit; With the participation of the Canadian Film or Video Production Services Tax Credit; Footage and stills courtesy of: ABC News/Nightline, CNN, Boot Girl Brandi Hodge, Boot Campaign, Marine Saluting American Flag by Sgt. Tisha Carter, U.S. Marine Corps, Corbis, Shaun Beiswanger, footage licensed by KXAN; The Punisher and the Punisher Skull design are © and TM 2014 Marvel; Chris Kyle Frog Foundation.”
       The 11 Nov 2014 Var review noted that Chris Kyle was in his mid-twenties when he enlisted in the Navy SEALS, not thirty years old as depicted in the film.
       According to a 25 May 2012 HR article, American Sniper was the first project set up by actor-producer Bradley Cooper’s production company, 22nd & Indiana, formed 1 Mar 2012 and based at Warner Bros. Cooper was not yet attached to star, although he was considering the lead role. Roughly one year later, a 3 May 2013 HR item announced that Steven Spielberg would direct, and his company, Dreamworks, would co-produce with Warner Bros., which would handle domestic distribution. However, the 7 Aug 2013 LAT reported that Spielberg had dropped out of the project, allegedly because he could not agree with Warner Bros. on a budget. The split was rumored to be amicable. Soon after, a 22 ... More Less

The film ends with a title reading, “Chris Kyle was killed that day by a veteran he was trying to help.” Scenes from Kyle’s memorial are shown during end credits, which include acknowledgments to the State of California and the California Film Commission, and the following statements: “With the participation of the Province of British Columbia Production Services Tax Credit; With the participation of the Canadian Film or Video Production Services Tax Credit; Footage and stills courtesy of: ABC News/Nightline, CNN, Boot Girl Brandi Hodge, Boot Campaign, Marine Saluting American Flag by Sgt. Tisha Carter, U.S. Marine Corps, Corbis, Shaun Beiswanger, footage licensed by KXAN; The Punisher and the Punisher Skull design are © and TM 2014 Marvel; Chris Kyle Frog Foundation.”
       The 11 Nov 2014 Var review noted that Chris Kyle was in his mid-twenties when he enlisted in the Navy SEALS, not thirty years old as depicted in the film.
       According to a 25 May 2012 HR article, American Sniper was the first project set up by actor-producer Bradley Cooper’s production company, 22nd & Indiana, formed 1 Mar 2012 and based at Warner Bros. Cooper was not yet attached to star, although he was considering the lead role. Roughly one year later, a 3 May 2013 HR item announced that Steven Spielberg would direct, and his company, Dreamworks, would co-produce with Warner Bros., which would handle domestic distribution. However, the 7 Aug 2013 LAT reported that Spielberg had dropped out of the project, allegedly because he could not agree with Warner Bros. on a budget. The split was rumored to be amicable. Soon after, a 22 Aug 2013 HR item reported that Clint Eastwood was interested in directing. Principal photography was expected to take place in early 2014 to accommodate Bradley Cooper’s schedule. As noted in the 11 Nov 2014 Var review, Cooper gained forty pounds for the role of “Chris Kyle.”
       A 23 Apr 2014 LAT article reported that ten days of filming at Blue Cloud Movie Ranch in Santa Clarita, CA, had just begun, after twelve days of shooting in Morocco.
The project received $6.8 million in tax credits from the California Film Commission, designated for pictures with small to mid-size budgets shooting in CA. The credit applied to the film’s eligible production costs, which amounted to $34 million.
       A 17 Aug 2014 LAT item stated that principal photography had been completed by Jun 2014, and Eastwood planned to have the picture ready for release by the end of the year.
       The film debuted on Veterans Day, 11 Nov 2014, as a secret screening at AFI Fest, according to a 13 Nov 2014 LAT brief.
       American Sniper was named one of AFI’s Movies of the Year and one of the Top Ten Films of the year by the National Board of Review, which also honored Clint Eastwood with Best Director. The film received Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Actor in a Leading Role (Bradley Cooper), Film Editing, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, and Writing (Adapted Screenplay).
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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
25 May 2012.
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Hollywood Reporter
3 May 2013.
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Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 2013.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Nov 2014.
---
Los Angeles Times
7 Aug 2013
Calendar, p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
23 Apr 2014
Section B, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
17 Aug 2014
Calendar, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
13 Nov 2014
Calendar, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
25 Dec 2014
Calendar, p. 10.
New York Times
25 Dec 2014
Section C, p. 12.
Variety
11 Nov 2014.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Pictures Presents
In Association with Village Roadshow Pictures
In Association with Ratpac-Dune Entertainment
A Mad Chance Production
A 22nd & Indiana Production
A Malpaso Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d 2d asst dir
1st asst dir, Morocco Unit
2d asst dir, Morocco Unit
2d 2d asst dir, Morocco Unit
2d 2d asst dir, Morocco Unit
3d asst dir, Morocco Unit
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Line prod, Morocco Unit
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam/Steadicam op
Cam/Steadicam op
Cam 1st asst
Cam 1st asst
Cam 2d asst
Cam 2d asst
2d unit dir of photog/ B cam op
B cam 1st asst
B cam 2d asst
Aerial coord
Aerial coord
Aerial cam op
Spacecam tech
Cam loader
DIT tech
DIT tech
Still photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Set lighting tech
Set lighting tech
Set lighting tech
Set lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Rigging best boy
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
B dolly grip
Rigging key grip
Rigging grip best boy
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Best boy grip, Morocco Unit
Grip, Morocco Unit
Grip, Morocco Unit
Grip, Morocco Unit
Grip, Morocco Unit
Grip, Morocco Unit
Best boy lighting tech, Morocco Unit
Lighting tech, Morocco Unit
Lighting tech, Morocco Unit
Lighting tech, Morocco Unit
Lighting tech, Morocco Unit
Lighting tech, Morocco Unit
Camera cranes and dollies by
Lighting equipment provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
Art dept coord
Graphic des
Storyboard artist
Asst art dir, Morocco Unit
Art dept coord, Morocco Unit
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Avid tech support by
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Key armorer
Armorer
Armorer
Const coord
General foreman
Standby painter
Greens foreman
Labor foreman
Propmaker foreman
Propmaker foreman
Propmaker foreman
Plaster foreman
Leadman
Gang boss
Foreman
Foreman
Drapery foreman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
On set dresser
Set des
Set des
Set des
Asst prop, Morocco Unit
Set dec, Morocco Unit
Leadman, Morocco Unit
Swing gang, Morocco Unit
Swing gang, Morocco Unit
Swing gang, Morocco Unit
Buyer, Morocco Unit
Const nurse, Morocco Unit
Const nurse, Morocco Unit
Const mgr, Morocco Unit
Paint supv, Morocco Unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Key costumer
Key costumer
Set costumer
Set costumer
Set costumer
Set costumer
Costumer
Costumer
Head ager/Dyer
Ager/Dyer
Cost supv, Morocco Unit
Costumer, Morocco Unit
Costumer, Morocco Unit
Costumer, Morocco Unit
Costumer, Morocco Unit
Costumer, Morocco Unit
Costumer, Morocco Unit
MUSIC
Addl mus/Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv ADR/Dial ed
Dial ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd des
Asst sd ed
ADR ed
Supv foley ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Addl rec-rec mixer
Mix tech
Re-rec eng
Loc sd eff mixer
Loc sd eff mixer
Loc sd eff mixer
Foley mixer
Foley mixer
Foley mixer
Sd asst, Morocco Unit
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
VFX data wrangler
VFX data wrangler
VFX assoc prod
Spec eff supv
Spec eff coord
Spec eff pyro supv
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff pyro foreman
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Video & computer graphics supv
SPFX foreman, Morocco Unit
Visual eff by
VFX supv, Visual eff by MPC
VFX prod, Visual eff by MPC
DFX supv, Visual eff by MPC
2d supv, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
VFX digital artist and prod, Visual eff by MPC
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
Visual eff by Pacific Title & Art Studio
VFX supv, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imageworks
VFX supv, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imageworks
VFX prod, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imageworks
VFX prod, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imageworks
Digital artist, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imagew
Digital artist, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imagew
Digital artist, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imagew
Digital artist, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imagew
Digital artist, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imagew
Digital artist, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imagew
Digital artist, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imagew
Digital artist, Visual eff by Sony Pictures Imagew
Visual eff by
Visual eff supv, Visual eff by Image Engine
Visual eff prod, Visual eff by Image Engine
Visual eff prod mgr, Visual eff by Image Engine
Compositing supv, Visual eff by Image Engine
Visual eff by
MAKEUP
Make-up dept head
Key make-up artist
Mr. Cooper's make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Make-up artist
Hair dept head
Key hair stylist
Mr. Cooper's hair stylist
Hair stylist
Hair stylist
Make-up artist, Morocco Unit
Make-up artist, Morocco Unit
Make-up artist, Morocco Unit
Make-up artist, Morocco Unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting by
Prod supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Prod assoc
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Set staff asst
Prod accountant
1st asst prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Key asst loc mgr
Key asst loc mgr
Key asst loc mgr
Key asst loc mgr
Key asst loc mgr
Sr military tech adv
USMC (Retired)
Navy tech adv
Military tech adv
USMCR
Military tech adv
Consultant
Consultant
Iraqi adv
Iraqi adv
Dialect coach
Mr. Cooper's trainer
Asst to Mr. Cooper
Asst to Mr. Cooper
Asst to Mr. Lazar
Asst to Mr. Lazar
Studio teacher
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Picture car capt
Military picture car capt
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Extras casting
Extras casting
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Craft service
Craft service
Craft service
Set medic
Set medic
Set medic
Set medic
Animal wrangler
Snake wrangler
Horse & livestock wrangler
Horse & livestock wrangler
Prod coord, Morocco Unit
Asst prod coord, Morocco Unit
Prod accountant, Morocco Unit
1st asst accountant, Morocco Unit
Military liasion, Morocco Unit
Iraqi adv, Morocco Unit
Casting, Morocco Unit
Key loc mgr, Morocco Unit
Loc mgr, Morocco Unit
Key asst loc mgr, Morocco Unit
Asst loc mgr, Morocco Unit
Asst loc mgr, Morocco Unit
Asst loc mgr, Morocco Unit
Asst loc mgr, Morocco Unit
Base camp mgr, Morocco Unit
Asst base camp mgr, Morocco Unit
Unit doctor, Morocco Unit
Unit nurse, Morocco Unit
Security, Morocco Unit
Set staff asst, Morocco Unit
Set staff asst, Morocco Unit
Set staff asst, Morocco Unit
Set staff asst, Morocco Unit
Set staff asst, Morocco Unit
Set staff asst, Morocco Unit
Set staff asst, Morocco Unit
Catering, Morocco Unit
Catering, Morocco Unit
Catering, Morocco Unit
Craft service, Morocco Unit
Craft service, Morocco Unit
Transportation coord, Morocco Unit
Transportation capt, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
Staff asst, Morocco Unit
STAND INS
Stunt coord, Morocco Unit
Action vehicles nurse, Morocco Unit
HOD action vehicle coord, Morocco Unit
Action vehicle coord, Morocco Unit
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Digital intermediate and opticals by
Digital intermediate colorist
Digital intermediate ed
Digital intermediate prod
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice.
SONGS
“Taya’s Theme,” written by Clint Eastwood, performed by Gennady Loktionov
“Someone Like You,” written and performed by Van Morrison, courtesy of Exile Productions, Ltd
“The Funeral,” written and performed by Ennio Morricone, courtesy of Universal Music Ricordi srl.
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 December 2014
Premiere Information:
AFI Fest screening: 11 Nov 2014; Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 Dec 2014
Production Date:
Apr--Jun 2014
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby® Digital in selected theatres; Datasat Digital Sound in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras and Lenses
Duration(in mins):
134
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
49458
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Perched on the roof of a building in Fallujah, Iraq, Chris Kyle aims his rifle at a woman and child on the street. With his finger poised on the trigger, Chris watches the woman pass a grenade to the boy. As a child growing up in Texas, Chris hunts with his father, a stern man who tells Chris and his brother, Jeff, that there are three kinds of people in the world: sheep, wolves, and sheepdogs, the protectors. Chris grows up to become a rodeo rider. However, when his girl friend, Sarah, leaves because Chris is never home, he wonders if he should change his lifestyle. A television news report about terrorist attacks in Tanzania and Kenya inspires Chris to visit an Armed Forces recruiting office, where a Navy officer suggests he consider joining the Navy SEALS. Chris undergoes brutal training in San Diego, California. At a bar, he meets Taya, who swears she will never marry a Navy SEAL but eventually agrees to go on a date with him. In sniper training, Chris impresses his instructor when he shoots a snake instead of the paper target and states, “I’m better when it’s breathing.” On September 11, 2001, Al Qaeda terrorists fly airplanes into two World Trade Center buildings in New York City, and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Chris becomes even more adamant about serving his country. Taya worries about their relationship, but Chris declares his love and asks her to marry him. At their wedding, Chris learns that his unit will be deployed in a few days. He arrives in Fallujah, Iraq, where AQI (Al Qaeda in Iraq) has posted rewards for American heads. As a sniper, ... +


Perched on the roof of a building in Fallujah, Iraq, Chris Kyle aims his rifle at a woman and child on the street. With his finger poised on the trigger, Chris watches the woman pass a grenade to the boy. As a child growing up in Texas, Chris hunts with his father, a stern man who tells Chris and his brother, Jeff, that there are three kinds of people in the world: sheep, wolves, and sheepdogs, the protectors. Chris grows up to become a rodeo rider. However, when his girl friend, Sarah, leaves because Chris is never home, he wonders if he should change his lifestyle. A television news report about terrorist attacks in Tanzania and Kenya inspires Chris to visit an Armed Forces recruiting office, where a Navy officer suggests he consider joining the Navy SEALS. Chris undergoes brutal training in San Diego, California. At a bar, he meets Taya, who swears she will never marry a Navy SEAL but eventually agrees to go on a date with him. In sniper training, Chris impresses his instructor when he shoots a snake instead of the paper target and states, “I’m better when it’s breathing.” On September 11, 2001, Al Qaeda terrorists fly airplanes into two World Trade Center buildings in New York City, and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Chris becomes even more adamant about serving his country. Taya worries about their relationship, but Chris declares his love and asks her to marry him. At their wedding, Chris learns that his unit will be deployed in a few days. He arrives in Fallujah, Iraq, where AQI (Al Qaeda in Iraq) has posted rewards for American heads. As a sniper, Chris’s job is to watch over Marines on the ground as they go door-to-door, ensuring that Fallujah is evacuated. On his first day, Chris watches from a rooftop as a woman hands a grenade to a young boy. He keeps the boy in his crosshairs as he approaches a convoy of U.S. soldiers, then shoots him down. The woman runs to pick up the grenade, and Chris shoots her as well. That night, he tells another soldier that he witnessed evil like he had never seen it before, and regrets his first “kills” were a woman and child. Over time, Chris earns the nickname “The Legend,” as he excels at sniping terrorists and thwarting attacks on U.S. troops. He calls home and speaks to a pregnant Taya, but does not answer when she asks if he has killed anyone. Taya informs him that Jeff, his younger brother, was recently deployed. Chris is briefed on a mission to find Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, a top AQI operative. One day, Chris abandons his post on a rooftop to help Marines search buildings. They come across a family still living in their apartment and demand to know why they have not yet evacuated. The head of the household, Sheikh al-Obeidi, says he is following orders from “The Butcher,” Zarqawi’s ruthless “enforcer” who cut off the arm of one of the sheikh’s female family members. The shiekh asks for $100,000 in exchange for the Butcher’s real name. Later, Chris speaks to Taya on the phone as he rides to a building where the Butcher might be located. Meanwhile, Mustafa, an Olympic sharpshooter from Syria, aims a sniper rifle at Chris’s truck. Mustafa shoots, inciting a firefight, and Taya overhears the mayhem on Chris’s discarded phone. Taking cover inside a building, Chris uses a mirror to watch the street. He sees the Butcher drag the sheikh’s son into the middle of the street, drill into his head with a power tool, and shout, “You talk to them, you die with them.” The sheikh is also killed. Later, Chris learns the operation is being shut down pending further intelligence. He is frustrated that he is set to go home in three weeks. When he returns to San Diego, Taya, who is nine months pregnant, admits to feeling estranged. Chris promises he is the same despite his detached demeanor. At an ultrasound appointment, the doctor takes Chris’s blood pressure and discovers it is dangerously high, but Chris says he feels fine. On the way home, as he and Taya argue, she goes into labor. On his second tour in Iraq, Chris sees Jeff at the air base and embraces him. Although Chris says he is proud of his brother, Jeff reveals he has become disillusioned by the war. Due to Chris’s reputation as the deadliest sniper in Fallujah, a $180,000 reward is placed on his head, and Mustafa plans to collect it. One day, Marc Lee, a Marine in Chris’s unit, confesses that he is having a hard time believing in what they are doing. That night, Chris leads a group in a building search, and they find an apartment inhabited by an Iraqi family. The soldiers establish a base in the apartment, which is across the street from a restaurant where the Butcher is believed to be operating. After hours of staking out the restaurant, the soldiers join the Iraqi family for dinner. Chris notices the father has a callous on his elbow and suspects the man has been propping himself on the ground behind a sniper gun. In another room, Chris finds a store of weapons under the floorboards. He subdues the man and gives him the option of going to a detention center or helping his group gain access to the restaurant. Agreeing to help, the man goes to the restaurant door and knocks. The door opens, and U.S. soldiers immediately shoot down the armed man behind it. Chris’s group infiltrates the restaurant, killing more terrorists inside, where they find severed body parts and a dead man hanging from the ceiling. The Butcher escapes in a car, but Chris shoots at the vehicle, causing an explosion that kills the Butcher. Back in San Diego, a young veteran recognizes Chris at a mechanic’s shop and thanks him for saving his life. He tells Chris’s son, Colton, that his father is a hero, and suggests Chris visit the VA (Veterans Affairs) hospital. Later, Chris loses his temper when a nurse doesn’t attend to his crying newborn daughter in the hospital nursery. Taya tells Chris she is living her life alone and says the war has changed him. On his third tour in Iraq, Chris accompanies a fellow sniper to the medic tent after being shot. He suspects Mustafa is responsible, since the shot came from over 1,000 meters away. Returning to town, Chris witnesses as his friend Marc Lee is shot and killed. Chris returns to the U.S. to attend Marc’s funeral. There, Marc’s mother reads a letter in which Marc questions the pursuit of glory that motivates soldiers in war. On the way home, Taya tries to discuss the letter with Chris, who says Marc paid the price for giving up. At the VA hospital, Chris visits one of his wounded comrades, who tells him that he is officially the deadliest sniper in U.S. military history. In bed with Taya, Chris tells his wife she would be okay if anything happened to him. She worries that he wants to die and says he doesn’t know when to quit. She begs Chris to be human again, and threatens she and the kids might not be there for him if he goes to war again. Chris deploys on a fourth tour. He sets out to kill Mustafa, who has been sniping soldiers as they try to secure a wall in downtown Fallujah. Despite an oncoming sandstorm, Chris’s group is sent into town to stake out Mustafa. Chris spots him 2,100 yards away and requests to shoot. Although other soldiers discourage him from shooting, since the noise would alert AQI operatives on the ground to their position, Chris takes the shot and kills Mustafa. AQI fighters swarm the area and a bloody firefight ensues. Chris calls Taya in a panic and tells her he is ready to come home. The sandstorm descends, making it nearly impossible to see. Chris barely makes it inside a truck that arrives to rescue the surviving soldiers. Sometime later, Chris returns home but stops at a bar before seeing his family. Taya is disturbed by her husband’s antisocial behavior, and rushes to stop him when Chris almost attacks a dog at a party. Chris meets with a psychologist at the VA, who says the Navy credits him with over 160 kills. Chris claims that he regrets nothing but is haunted by all the men he failed to save. The psychologist suggests there are plenty of men who need saving at the hospital. Chris spends time with amputees and regains a sense of peace. He and his family move to a house in the country, where he and his son go hunting for the first time. On February 2, 2013, Taya embraces Chris and says she is proud of him. He tells her he plans to go to the shooting range with Eddie Ray Routh, a veteran going through a hard time. Taya eyes the man suspiciously when she sees him waiting in the driveway. Later that day, Chris is killed by Routh. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.