Baby Face Harrington (1935)

60-61 or 63 mins | Comedy | 12 April 1935

Director:

Raoul Walsh

Producer:

Edgar Selwyn

Cinematographer:

Oliver T. Marsh

Editor:

William S. Gray

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was Public Enemy No. 2. Some contemporary sources conflict with the film on the screenplay credits: while the onscreen credits list Nunnally Johnson and Edwin H. Knopf with the screenplay, Var lists Harry Segall and Barry Trivers. Var credits Johnson and Knopf with the adaptation. According to HR news items, Frank Lackteen, William Demarest, Robert McWade and Harry Tyler were added to the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. ...

More Less

The working title of this film was Public Enemy No. 2. Some contemporary sources conflict with the film on the screenplay credits: while the onscreen credits list Nunnally Johnson and Edwin H. Knopf with the screenplay, Var lists Harry Segall and Barry Trivers. Var credits Johnson and Knopf with the adaptation. According to HR news items, Frank Lackteen, William Demarest, Robert McWade and Harry Tyler were added to the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Feb 1935
p. 4
Daily Variety
21 Mar 1935
p. 3
Film Daily
19 Jun 1935
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jan 1935
pp. 3-4
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jan 1935
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 1935
p. 4, 8
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 1935
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
22 Mar 1935
p. 11
Motion Picture Herald
2 Mar 1935
p. 51
Motion Picture Herald
30 Mar 1935
p. 40
MPSI
1 Apr 1935
p. 34
Variety
26 Jun 1935
p. 23
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Addl dial
Contr to dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
2d cam
2d cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Howard H. Campbell
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
Rec dir
PRODUCTION MISC
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Something to Brag About by Edgar Selwyn and William Le Baron (New York, 13 Aug 1925).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Public Enemy No. 2
Release Date:
12 April 1935
Production Date:
21 Jan--8 Feb 1935
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Loew's Inc.
8 April 1935
LP5467
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60-61 or 63
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
713
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Before attending a social function at the Gardenhurst Country Club, an exclusive, members-only establishment, socialite Millicent instructs her stodgy husband Willie to mix with the crowd and be sociable. Meanwhile, Millie runs into her old sweetheart Ronald, a successful car salesman who has been transferred to Gardenhurst. Both are delighted to see each other and look on as Millie's maladroit husband bungles a magic trick before a crowd of people. Embarrassed, Millie takes Willie home, where she reads a newspaper story about the latest crime committed by serial thief Rocky Bannister. Millie then tells her husband that she wants him to make a name for himself and be more like Ronald, but the flustered Willie can only respond by offering his wife money. Exasperated, Millie suggests that Willie take the initiative and ask for a raise the next time he goes to work, and he promises to do so. However, no sooner does he bring up the subject with his boss, than he is fired. The hapless Willie now decides that the only way he can redeem himself is by turning in his insurance policy and giving the money to his wife. After withdrawing two thousand dollars in cash, Willie is advised by real estate man Skinner to invest his money, but Willie rejects the offer and returns to his wife. When Willie gets home, he realizes that the bundle of money is missing and lies to Millie about not getting a raise. The next time Willie sees Skinner, he notices that he is waving a stack of bills totaling two thousand dollars, which the real estate investor says he ...

More Less

Before attending a social function at the Gardenhurst Country Club, an exclusive, members-only establishment, socialite Millicent instructs her stodgy husband Willie to mix with the crowd and be sociable. Meanwhile, Millie runs into her old sweetheart Ronald, a successful car salesman who has been transferred to Gardenhurst. Both are delighted to see each other and look on as Millie's maladroit husband bungles a magic trick before a crowd of people. Embarrassed, Millie takes Willie home, where she reads a newspaper story about the latest crime committed by serial thief Rocky Bannister. Millie then tells her husband that she wants him to make a name for himself and be more like Ronald, but the flustered Willie can only respond by offering his wife money. Exasperated, Millie suggests that Willie take the initiative and ask for a raise the next time he goes to work, and he promises to do so. However, no sooner does he bring up the subject with his boss, than he is fired. The hapless Willie now decides that the only way he can redeem himself is by turning in his insurance policy and giving the money to his wife. After withdrawing two thousand dollars in cash, Willie is advised by real estate man Skinner to invest his money, but Willie rejects the offer and returns to his wife. When Willie gets home, he realizes that the bundle of money is missing and lies to Millie about not getting a raise. The next time Willie sees Skinner, he notices that he is waving a stack of bills totaling two thousand dollars, which the real estate investor says he made in a recent deal. Believing that the money is evidence that Skinner was the one who robbed him, Willie proceeds to put his claim on the cash and accidentally pulls a gun on him, which Millie had bought to protect herself against Rocky Bannister. Skinner hands over the cash, but when Willie finds the money he thought was stolen in his wallet, he faints. Skinner quickly summons Sergeant Parker to investigate, and despite Willie's explanation of the mishap, the real estate man threatens to press charges against him. Willie promises to return Skinner's money, but before he has a chance to do so, the infamous Rocky Bannister breaks into his house and forces him to hand over the money he saw Willie withdraw from the bank. Bannister makes off with both Willie's and Skinner's money, and when the police disbelieve Willie's story, he is arrested for the theft. Rumors quickly spread about Willie's arrest, and the newspapers print stories alleging his connection with the Bannister mob. Willie is jailed with hardened criminal Mullens, whose gangster friends spring him from his cell and take Willie along with them. Before the gangsters leave to put gas in their getaway car, which they plan to use for a bank robbery, Willie cleverly leaves a note for the gas station attendant to call the police and alert them to the impending crime. Bannister is left behind to kill Willie, which he plans to do by hanging him. Willie, however, manages to stall Bannister until the police arrive and arrest him. When the mobsters and their leader are put behind bars, Willie is re-united with his now proud wife and hailed as a hero by the public.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Life of an American Fireman

The Edison catalog summary is as follows: "It would be difficult for the exhibitor to conceive the amount of work involved and the number of rehearsals necessary to produce ... >>

Psycho

Actor Vaughn Taylor's surname is misspelled "Tayler" in the onscreen credits. Several Jun and Jul 1959 HR news items erroneously refer to the film as Psyche. ... >>

Gone with the Wind

[ Note from the Editors : the following information is based on contemporary news items, feature articles, reviews, interviews, memoranda and corporate records. Information obtained from modern sources ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.