No More Ladies (1935)

79 or 81-82 mins | Romantic comedy | 14 June 1935

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HISTORY

According to a HR pre-production news item, actors Ruth Weston and Lucile Watson, who starred in the stage production of No More Ladies , were initially announced as stars of this film. Another pre-production news item notes that an aquatic stage, with a pool serviced by hydraulic pumps, was built for the film, and was to be the first of its kind to be used in any picture. Although a pre-release HR news item indicated that the film would mark the last screen appearance of screenwriter, playwright and novelist Donald Ogden Stewart, who was set for a bit role, his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. HR production charts list actress Louise Henry in the cast, but her appearance in the released film has also not been confirmed. A contemporary NYT article notes that a dispute arose between M-G-M and screen writer Rachel Crothers, the veteran Broadway playwright, whose first screen writing job was that of adapting A. E. Thomas' play for the screen. In the article, Crothers lambasts the Hollywood system and complains that the producers and directors were given "every right to pull it [the story] to pieces and destroy it." Following the completion of her assignment, Crothers maintained that other writers had re-written the story so many times that she could no longer recognize her work. At her request, M-G-M removed Crothers' credit from the film, and she went on to work with Sam Goldwyn, who, she claimed, was the only producer in Hollywood who treated writers with respect. Although most contemporary sources credit Irving G. ... More Less

According to a HR pre-production news item, actors Ruth Weston and Lucile Watson, who starred in the stage production of No More Ladies , were initially announced as stars of this film. Another pre-production news item notes that an aquatic stage, with a pool serviced by hydraulic pumps, was built for the film, and was to be the first of its kind to be used in any picture. Although a pre-release HR news item indicated that the film would mark the last screen appearance of screenwriter, playwright and novelist Donald Ogden Stewart, who was set for a bit role, his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. HR production charts list actress Louise Henry in the cast, but her appearance in the released film has also not been confirmed. A contemporary NYT article notes that a dispute arose between M-G-M and screen writer Rachel Crothers, the veteran Broadway playwright, whose first screen writing job was that of adapting A. E. Thomas' play for the screen. In the article, Crothers lambasts the Hollywood system and complains that the producers and directors were given "every right to pull it [the story] to pieces and destroy it." Following the completion of her assignment, Crothers maintained that other writers had re-written the story so many times that she could no longer recognize her work. At her request, M-G-M removed Crothers' credit from the film, and she went on to work with Sam Goldwyn, who, she claimed, was the only producer in Hollywood who treated writers with respect. Although most contemporary sources credit Irving G. Thalberg as the producer of No More Ladies , Var lists Edward H. Griffith. According to a HR pre-release news item, George Cukor took over direction of the picture when Griffith fell ill, but refused a co-direction credit. The film marked the screen debut of Joan Fontaine, who was credited as Joan Burfield. An unidentified source in the file on the film at the AMPAS Library credits Jack D. Moore and Henry Grace with the set decoration. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Mar 35
p. 3.
Daily Variety
31 May 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 Jun 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 34
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Mar 35
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Mar 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Mar 35
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 35
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Apr 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Apr 35
p. 30.
Hollywood Reporter
31 May 35
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
3 Jun 35
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
27 Apr 35
p. 42.
Motion Picture Herald
8 Jun 35
p. 73.
New York Times
28-Apr-35
---
New York Times
22 Jun 35
p. 18.
Variety
26 Jun 35
p. 23.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Fill-In dir
Asst dir
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play No More Ladies by A. E. Thomas (New York, 23 Jan 1934).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"All I Do Is Dream of You," music by Nacio Herb Brown, lyrics by Arthur Freed.
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 June 1935
Production Date:
12 March--mid April 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
10 June 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5612
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
79 or 81-82
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
891
SYNOPSIS

After waiting for over two hours for her beau, Sherry Warren, to show up for their dinner date, Marcia declares, as she has on many similar occasions, that Sherry is a heartbreaking scamp, and then turns in for the night. Marcia shares her elegant home with her grandmother, Fanny Townsend, who warns her about the rakish Sherry, yet both love him nevertheless. Also vying for Marcia's attentions is the naive and boring Oliver, who has become a seemingly permanent fixture in the Townsend household, and is usually found playing backgammon with Fanny. Later that night, Sherry shows up and, though offering no valid excuses for his tardiness, manages to charm Marcia into accompanying him to a nightclub. When Edgar Holden, Sherry's second cousin, spots the man-about-town, he jokingly offers to protect Marcia from his notorious abuses, and sends prizefighter James McIntyre Duffy over to rough him up. The two, however, turn out to be old chums, thus foiling Edgar's plan. Soon after, Jim Salston, whose wife Sherry had stolen from him years ago, approaches the playboy to complain that Caroline, another object of Sherry's affections, is upset because he passed her up on the dance floor. While Sherry makes amends with Caroline, Marcia leaves with Edgar for a drive in the park. Later, Sherry looks for Marcia at her home, finds that she is not there, and is warned by Fanny that if he is not careful he will meet with the same fate as the famed sea captain, Louis Casabianca, who died when he blew up his ship in order to prevent the enemy from capturing it. Marcia finally shows up, ... +


After waiting for over two hours for her beau, Sherry Warren, to show up for their dinner date, Marcia declares, as she has on many similar occasions, that Sherry is a heartbreaking scamp, and then turns in for the night. Marcia shares her elegant home with her grandmother, Fanny Townsend, who warns her about the rakish Sherry, yet both love him nevertheless. Also vying for Marcia's attentions is the naive and boring Oliver, who has become a seemingly permanent fixture in the Townsend household, and is usually found playing backgammon with Fanny. Later that night, Sherry shows up and, though offering no valid excuses for his tardiness, manages to charm Marcia into accompanying him to a nightclub. When Edgar Holden, Sherry's second cousin, spots the man-about-town, he jokingly offers to protect Marcia from his notorious abuses, and sends prizefighter James McIntyre Duffy over to rough him up. The two, however, turn out to be old chums, thus foiling Edgar's plan. Soon after, Jim Salston, whose wife Sherry had stolen from him years ago, approaches the playboy to complain that Caroline, another object of Sherry's affections, is upset because he passed her up on the dance floor. While Sherry makes amends with Caroline, Marcia leaves with Edgar for a drive in the park. Later, Sherry looks for Marcia at her home, finds that she is not there, and is warned by Fanny that if he is not careful he will meet with the same fate as the famed sea captain, Louis Casabianca, who died when he blew up his ship in order to prevent the enemy from capturing it. Marcia finally shows up, behaving as if nothing out of the ordinary has happened, and then shares a late night snack with Sherry, while they discuss the institution of marriage and all its attendant woes. Though they both agree that the odds against a succussful marriage are overwhelming, Sherry proposes marriage to the obstinate Marcia, and she accepts. When Fanny enters the room, she quickly realizes what has just transpired, and announces that Casabianca's ship has just sunk. While honeymooning at Whitehall Beach, Marcia finds Sherry flirting with Sally French and later admits that she is jealous. At Williams' Bar, Sherry steals Edgar's date, Theresa German, and fails to return to Marcia's that evening. Sherry calls her to tell her that he will not be coming home because Edgar has gotten ill and needs his help. Marcia knows Sherry is lying because Edgar is home with her, and realizes that her philandering husband has already ruined their marriage. Though a cad, Sherry later tells his wife the truth about the incident, admitting that he spent the night with Theresa, a "graduate of the old speakeasies." Insulted, Marcia slaps Sherry, but concedes that she knew about his flaws when she married him and predicts that it will happen again. Marcia takes her revenge on Sherry by throwing an impromptu party and inviting, unknown to her husband, a number of people who have been ill-treated by him. One of the first guests to arrive is Jim, who once tried to shoot Sherry, followed by Theresa and Lady Diana Knowlton, another lover Jim had lost to the playboy. Also present is Caroline. After Marcia announces that she and Jim are going for a drive, a quarrel ensues and Sherry promises to be unforgiving if she leaves. A game of charades affords Jim and Marcia an opportunity to escape, and when Sherry discovers the two have not returned the next morning, he makes preparations to leave for good. Fanny tries to stop him, and then Marcia pulls up just in time to save their marriage. After admitting that she felt bad about cheating on him because she truly loves him, all is forgiven and the two embrace. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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