Fugitive in the Sky (1936)

60 or 64 mins | Mystery | 28 November 1936

Director:

Nick Grinde

Cinematographer:

Ted McCord

Editor:

Frank Dewar

Production Designer:

Ted Smith

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

A pre-release title of the film was Heroes of the Air. ...

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A pre-release title of the film was Heroes of the Air.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 Oct 1936
p. 3
Film Daily
6 Jan 1937
p. 12
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 1936
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1936
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
31 Oct 1936
p. 41
New York Times
16 Jan 1937
p. 21
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Supv
WRITER
Orig story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Heroes of the Air
Release Date:
28 November 1936
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. & The Vitaphone Corp.
24 November 1936
LP6725
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60 or 64
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2505
SYNOPSIS

At the airport, reporter Terry Brewer is checking out the passengers to see if any of them are newsworthy. When he recognizes police detective Mike Phelan, who is traveling under a pseudonym, he hurries to call his paper. The editor orders him to take the flight and keep an eye on Phelan. They suspect that Phelan is on the trail of escaped convict Killer Madsen. Terry takes the last seat on the plane, glad of the opportunity to spend time with stewardess Rita Moore, with whom he is in love. The passengers include a punchy fighter and his manager, an old woman with an interest in astrology, a tall, younger woman, a schoolteacher and a drunk. When the airplane lands in Albuquerque, Terry quizzes Phelan, who denies that Madsen is his object. Soon after takeoff, one of the passengers is stabbed to death. Rita discovers the body, and she and Bob White, the pilot, wake the rest of the passengers. To everyone's surprise, the young woman turns out to be Madsen dressed in women's clothes. He pulls a gun and destroys the radio, insisting that Bob land in a field, despite a severe dust storm. Terry asks Madsen for an exclusive interview, during which, Madsen denies that he murdered the dead passenger. Rita tries unsuccessfully to dope Madsen's coffee. In the following confusion, the engines die and Bob makes a forced landing in the midst of the storm. Everyone seeks refuge in an isolated farm house. While Bob and Terry try to fix the engines, Rita discovers that the old woman is actually younger than she looks. She ...

More Less

At the airport, reporter Terry Brewer is checking out the passengers to see if any of them are newsworthy. When he recognizes police detective Mike Phelan, who is traveling under a pseudonym, he hurries to call his paper. The editor orders him to take the flight and keep an eye on Phelan. They suspect that Phelan is on the trail of escaped convict Killer Madsen. Terry takes the last seat on the plane, glad of the opportunity to spend time with stewardess Rita Moore, with whom he is in love. The passengers include a punchy fighter and his manager, an old woman with an interest in astrology, a tall, younger woman, a schoolteacher and a drunk. When the airplane lands in Albuquerque, Terry quizzes Phelan, who denies that Madsen is his object. Soon after takeoff, one of the passengers is stabbed to death. Rita discovers the body, and she and Bob White, the pilot, wake the rest of the passengers. To everyone's surprise, the young woman turns out to be Madsen dressed in women's clothes. He pulls a gun and destroys the radio, insisting that Bob land in a field, despite a severe dust storm. Terry asks Madsen for an exclusive interview, during which, Madsen denies that he murdered the dead passenger. Rita tries unsuccessfully to dope Madsen's coffee. In the following confusion, the engines die and Bob makes a forced landing in the midst of the storm. Everyone seeks refuge in an isolated farm house. While Bob and Terry try to fix the engines, Rita discovers that the old woman is actually younger than she looks. She reveals her discovery to Phelan. Meanwhile, Terry has surreptitiously repaired the airplane's radio and called for help. Rita distracts Madsen, enabling Terry and Bob to knock him unconscious. After the rescue planes arrive, Phelan reveals the old woman to be Katie Dorn, who killed her former sweetheart, the man on the plane, because he tried to run away with stolen bonds. The mystery solved, Bob proposes to Rita.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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