The Woman from Monte Carlo (1932)

58 or 65 mins | Melodrama | 9 January 1932

Director:

Michael Curtiz

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Editor:

Harold McLernon

Production Designer:

Anton Grot

Production Company:

First National Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The film's pre-release titles were The Captain's Wife and The Marked Woman. According to Var this was Lil Dagover's first American film. Reviews call Dagover's character "Lottie," although she is referred to as "Deanna" in the film. Michael Morton's adaptation of Claude Farrère's and Lucien Népoty's play, entitled In the Night Watch, opened in London on 21 Dec 1918; its New York premiere was on 29 Jan 1921. This became the basis of the 1928 First National film The Night Watch, which was directed by Alexander Korda and starred Paul Lukas and Billie Dove (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.3843). Farrère's and Népoty's play was also the basis for a British/French co-production in 1925 and a French film in 1935, both entitled Veilles d'Armes. ...

More Less

The film's pre-release titles were The Captain's Wife and The Marked Woman. According to Var this was Lil Dagover's first American film. Reviews call Dagover's character "Lottie," although she is referred to as "Deanna" in the film. Michael Morton's adaptation of Claude Farrère's and Lucien Népoty's play, entitled In the Night Watch, opened in London on 21 Dec 1918; its New York premiere was on 29 Jan 1921. This became the basis of the 1928 First National film The Night Watch, which was directed by Alexander Korda and starred Paul Lukas and Billie Dove (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.3843). Farrère's and Népoty's play was also the basis for a British/French co-production in 1925 and a French film in 1935, both entitled Veilles d'Armes.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
19 Oct 1931
p. 8
Film Daily
25 Oct 1931
p. 4
Film Daily
3 Jan 1932
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 1931
p. 3
International Photographer
1 Jan 1932
p. 33
Motion Picture Herald
9 Jan 1932
p. 37
New York Times
31 Dec 1931
p. 17
Variety
5 Jan 1932
p. 23
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITER
Scr and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech eff
Still photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play La Veille d'Armes by Claude Farrère and Lucien Népoty (Paris, 5 Jan 1917).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Captain's Wife
The Marked Woman
Release Date:
9 January 1932
Production Date:
began mid Oct 1931
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
First National Pictures, Inc.
8 January 1932
LP2744
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
58 or 65
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Deanna Corlaix, from Vienna, was once a playgirl but is now happily married to Commander Corlaix, an older man who married her to make her a lady, but then fell in love with her. Corlaix, commander of the La Fayette , the pride of the French Navy, is bound by his duty, and Deanna is left alone during his months at sea. One day, on the eve of World War I, Lieutenant George D'Ortelles, a former lover, brings her a note from her husband asking her to meet him aboard ship for a dance. While Deanna waits for her husband to join her, his executive officer, Brambourg, who knew her in Monte Carlo, makes advances toward her, but she laughs at him. During the dance, Corlaix receives word that war has been declared and all guests must go ashore. Angry that she must leave so soon and tipsy from champagne, Deanna complains to D'Ortelles, who has been ordered to accompany her off the ship. Instead, he hides her in his stateroom and swears his love, insisting that she could not love Corlaix. Believing his wife is already ashore, Corlaix confides in D'Ortelles that he does not believe Deanna loves him. She overhears her husband's remark and is determined to get to shore and forget D'Ortelles. The anchor, however, has already been pulled and she cannot escape. Brambourg suspects that D'Ortelles has a woman hidden and deliberately remains in the room, preventing Deanna from leaving. A ship is sighted, which flashes the code of an ally, and Corlaix allows it to get too close. The La Fayette is ...

More Less

Deanna Corlaix, from Vienna, was once a playgirl but is now happily married to Commander Corlaix, an older man who married her to make her a lady, but then fell in love with her. Corlaix, commander of the La Fayette , the pride of the French Navy, is bound by his duty, and Deanna is left alone during his months at sea. One day, on the eve of World War I, Lieutenant George D'Ortelles, a former lover, brings her a note from her husband asking her to meet him aboard ship for a dance. While Deanna waits for her husband to join her, his executive officer, Brambourg, who knew her in Monte Carlo, makes advances toward her, but she laughs at him. During the dance, Corlaix receives word that war has been declared and all guests must go ashore. Angry that she must leave so soon and tipsy from champagne, Deanna complains to D'Ortelles, who has been ordered to accompany her off the ship. Instead, he hides her in his stateroom and swears his love, insisting that she could not love Corlaix. Believing his wife is already ashore, Corlaix confides in D'Ortelles that he does not believe Deanna loves him. She overhears her husband's remark and is determined to get to shore and forget D'Ortelles. The anchor, however, has already been pulled and she cannot escape. Brambourg suspects that D'Ortelles has a woman hidden and deliberately remains in the room, preventing Deanna from leaving. A ship is sighted, which flashes the code of an ally, and Corlaix allows it to get too close. The La Fayette is torpedoed and over three hundred lives are lost. D'Ortelles' orderly gets Deanna safely ashore, but Corlaix is blamed for the sinking of the La Fayette and is court-martialed. At the trial, Brambourg is the only survivor who can prove the destroyer flashed the friendly code, but he refuses to clear Corlaix because he wants to succeed him. Deanna also saw the signal but says nothing in order to conceal her presence on the ship. Finally D'Ortelles recovers from his delirium in the hospital and arrives at the trial to save Corlaix, but is declared an incompetent witness. Deanna is forced to corroborate D'Ortelles' statement, exonerating her husband at the expense of her honor. Although Deanna and D'Ortelles are innocent of adultery, Brambourg incriminates them, after which D'Ortelles shoots Brambourg and is taken away. Corlaix leaves the courtroom with his reputation restored and abandons Deanna, who returns to Vienna to resume her life as a fallen woman.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Cape Fear

The film is bookended by scenes in which “Danielle Bowden” recites a reminiscence of the incident at Cape Fear that she wrote for a school assignment.
       A 31 Jul ... >>

Tokyo Joe

According to a 10 Dec 1948 HR news item, 2d unit director Art Black and cameramen Joseph Biroc and Emil Oster, Jr. shot 40,000 feet of background ... >>

The Princess Bride

The synopsis and history for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Synopsis and history were written by Fitrah Hamid, a student at Georgia ... >>

Frankenstein

Screen credits list "The Monster" as played by "?" in the opening cast list. The "?" is replaced by Boris Karloff's name in the end credits. Mary Shelley's ... >>

Man in the Attic

Marie Belloc Lowndes' popular novel first appeared as a short story in McClure's in Jan 1911. Although HR news items include Michael Pate and ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.