Public Enemy's Wife (1936)

65 or 69 mins | Drama | 25 July 1936

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HISTORY

Modern sources credit David O. Selznick with contributions to the story. The film was released in Britain as G-Man's Wife. It was remade by Warner Bros. in 1941 as Bullets for O'Hara, directed by William K. Howard and starring Roger Pryor, Joan Perry and Anthony Quinn. ...

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Modern sources credit David O. Selznick with contributions to the story. The film was released in Britain as G-Man's Wife. It was remade by Warner Bros. in 1941 as Bullets for O'Hara, directed by William K. Howard and starring Roger Pryor, Joan Perry and Anthony Quinn.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Jun 1936
p. 3
Film Daily
23 Jun 1936
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 1936
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
30 May 1936
p. 34
Motion Picture Herald
27 Jun 1936
p. 42
New York Times
9 Jul 1936
p. 17
Variety
15 Jul 1936
p. 31
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Abem Finkle
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Ernie Haller
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 July 1936
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
15 July 1936
LP6469
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65 or 69
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2158
SYNOPSIS

Gene Maroc and his wife Judith are serving time in prison for robbery and kidnapping. FBI agent Lee Laird is convinced that Maroc's testimony could put criminal Mike Corelli behind bars, and when Maroc refuses to talk, Lee questions Judith. She insists that she knew nothing about her husband's affairs and was convicted of a crime she did not commit. Now that she has served her sentence, she is determined to put the experience behind her. Before she leaves prison, Maroc warns her that if she ever remarries, he will kill her husband. After her divorce, Judith changes her name to Roberts and becomes engaged to Palm Beach playboy Thomas Duncan McKay, who does not know the truth about her earlier life. When Maroc sees their engagement announcement in the newspaper, he announces his intention to testify against Corelli. During the transfer from prison, he overwhelms his guards using gas and heads for Palm Beach. Maroc's escape sends Lee and fellow FBI agent Gene Ferguson to Judith's apartment to question her. Tommy arrives while they are there, and Judith is forced to tell him about Maroc. When Lee learns about Maroc's jealousy, he decides to use Judith's wedding as lure to capture Maroc. Tommy is not enthusiastic about the plan and fakes an injury in order to back out of the wedding. Lee decides to take his place, expecting Maroc to make his move before the ceremony is complete. Maroc senses a trap, however, and Lee and Judith are actually married. Continuing the deception, they pretend to leave for a honeymoon. Maroc once again avoids ...

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Gene Maroc and his wife Judith are serving time in prison for robbery and kidnapping. FBI agent Lee Laird is convinced that Maroc's testimony could put criminal Mike Corelli behind bars, and when Maroc refuses to talk, Lee questions Judith. She insists that she knew nothing about her husband's affairs and was convicted of a crime she did not commit. Now that she has served her sentence, she is determined to put the experience behind her. Before she leaves prison, Maroc warns her that if she ever remarries, he will kill her husband. After her divorce, Judith changes her name to Roberts and becomes engaged to Palm Beach playboy Thomas Duncan McKay, who does not know the truth about her earlier life. When Maroc sees their engagement announcement in the newspaper, he announces his intention to testify against Corelli. During the transfer from prison, he overwhelms his guards using gas and heads for Palm Beach. Maroc's escape sends Lee and fellow FBI agent Gene Ferguson to Judith's apartment to question her. Tommy arrives while they are there, and Judith is forced to tell him about Maroc. When Lee learns about Maroc's jealousy, he decides to use Judith's wedding as lure to capture Maroc. Tommy is not enthusiastic about the plan and fakes an injury in order to back out of the wedding. Lee decides to take his place, expecting Maroc to make his move before the ceremony is complete. Maroc senses a trap, however, and Lee and Judith are actually married. Continuing the deception, they pretend to leave for a honeymoon. Maroc once again avoids the FBI and kidnaps Judith from the hotel. After learning that Maroc plans to leave for Havana, Judith cuts the phone line and leaves a note asking the repairmen to contact Lee. Lee and his fellow investigators surround the hideout, and after a shootout, Maroc is captured. Judith and Lee realize they love each other and decide to stay married.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.