That Nazty Nuisance (1943)

43 mins | Comedy | 6 August 1943

Director:

Gordon Douglas

Producer:

Glenn Tryon

Cinematographer:

Robert Pittack

Editor:

Bert Jordan

Production Designer:

Charles D. Hall

Production Company:

Hal Roach Studios, Inc.
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HISTORY

A 3 Jul 1942 HR production chart lists the film under the title Nazi Nuisance , and credits Fred Guiol as the producer. The next, and final production chart for the film, appeared on 10 Jul 1942. That chart credits Glenn Tryon as producer-director. In the first chart, Sheldon Leonard is listed second in the cast, but on the second chart, his name was replaced by Joe Devlin's. This film is a sequel to Hal Roach's 1942 film The Devil with Hitler (see above). The viewed print was a combination of The Devil with Hitler and That Nazty Nuisance (which was copyrighted under the title Nazty Nuisance ). The above synopsis was taken from both the viewed print and a cutting continuity of Nazty Nuisance deposited in copyright records. Cast credits for the film were taken from the cutting continuity, but all other credits were from the viewed print. The filmmakers created certain names in the film by spelling words backwards: "Norom" for "Moron"; "Paj Mub" for "Bum Jap"; and "Kela Trams" for "Smart Alek." That Nazty Nuisance was one of Hal Roach's "streamlined features," a series of short comedies intended to fill the second half of a double bill. The first streamlined feature was the 1941 film Tanks a Million (see ... More Less

A 3 Jul 1942 HR production chart lists the film under the title Nazi Nuisance , and credits Fred Guiol as the producer. The next, and final production chart for the film, appeared on 10 Jul 1942. That chart credits Glenn Tryon as producer-director. In the first chart, Sheldon Leonard is listed second in the cast, but on the second chart, his name was replaced by Joe Devlin's. This film is a sequel to Hal Roach's 1942 film The Devil with Hitler (see above). The viewed print was a combination of The Devil with Hitler and That Nazty Nuisance (which was copyrighted under the title Nazty Nuisance ). The above synopsis was taken from both the viewed print and a cutting continuity of Nazty Nuisance deposited in copyright records. Cast credits for the film were taken from the cutting continuity, but all other credits were from the viewed print. The filmmakers created certain names in the film by spelling words backwards: "Norom" for "Moron"; "Paj Mub" for "Bum Jap"; and "Kela Trams" for "Smart Alek." That Nazty Nuisance was one of Hal Roach's "streamlined features," a series of short comedies intended to fill the second half of a double bill. The first streamlined feature was the 1941 film Tanks a Million (see above). More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
5 Jun 1943.
---
Film Daily
4 Jun 43
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jul 42
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 42
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Jun 43
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jun 44
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
12 Jun 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
21 Nov 42
p. 1019.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
18 Sep 43
p. 1546.
New York Times
28 May 1943.
---
New York Times
29 May 43
p. 10.
Variety
2 Jun 43
p. 8.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Nazty Nuisance
Nazi Nuisance
Release Date:
6 August 1943
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 28 May 1943
Production Date:
early July 1942
Copyright Claimant:
Hal Roach Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
9 December 1942
Copyright Number:
LP12324
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
43
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
PCA No:
8864
SYNOPSIS

During World War II, American sailor Benson, his captain, Spense, and their crew row ashore to the island of Norom after their supply ship is sunk. In Berchtesgaden, meanwhile, German Chancellor Adolf Hitler is plotting to mislead his Axis allies, Fascist Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, and the Japanese war department representative, Suki Yaki, by secretly going to Norom and signing a treaty with the Norom chief, Paj Mub. Hitler is unable to elude his allies, however, and is actually accompanied to the island by Mussolini and Suki Yaki. There German ambassador Von Popoff informs Hitler that the chief will serve a feast before signing the treaty. Benson, meanwhile, befriends magician's assistant Kela Trams and, upon learning about the presence of the Axis powers, takes the place of the magician, who is too drunk to perform. The chief, hoping to impress his guests, insists that Benson perform a disappearing act with Suki Yaki, and an orangutan appears in Suki Yaki's place. The chief then forces his guests to spend the night and refuses to sign the treaty until Suki Yaki returns. Hitler and Mussolini are outraged and have a pillow fight with the orangutan. When Suki Yaki, who had been knocked out, revives, Benson convinces him that the chief plans to behead them all in the morning. Benson then helps the Axis leaders escape to their submarine, which has been captured by Spense, and they become the Americans' prisoners. However, Von Popoff destroys the ship's instruments and the submarine hits bottom. Benson then ejects the Axis leaders through the torpedo tubes, and they are jettisoned head first into a ... +


During World War II, American sailor Benson, his captain, Spense, and their crew row ashore to the island of Norom after their supply ship is sunk. In Berchtesgaden, meanwhile, German Chancellor Adolf Hitler is plotting to mislead his Axis allies, Fascist Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, and the Japanese war department representative, Suki Yaki, by secretly going to Norom and signing a treaty with the Norom chief, Paj Mub. Hitler is unable to elude his allies, however, and is actually accompanied to the island by Mussolini and Suki Yaki. There German ambassador Von Popoff informs Hitler that the chief will serve a feast before signing the treaty. Benson, meanwhile, befriends magician's assistant Kela Trams and, upon learning about the presence of the Axis powers, takes the place of the magician, who is too drunk to perform. The chief, hoping to impress his guests, insists that Benson perform a disappearing act with Suki Yaki, and an orangutan appears in Suki Yaki's place. The chief then forces his guests to spend the night and refuses to sign the treaty until Suki Yaki returns. Hitler and Mussolini are outraged and have a pillow fight with the orangutan. When Suki Yaki, who had been knocked out, revives, Benson convinces him that the chief plans to behead them all in the morning. Benson then helps the Axis leaders escape to their submarine, which has been captured by Spense, and they become the Americans' prisoners. However, Von Popoff destroys the ship's instruments and the submarine hits bottom. Benson then ejects the Axis leaders through the torpedo tubes, and they are jettisoned head first into a beach. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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