Captain Applejack (1931)

65 mins | Comedy-drama | 31 January 1931

Director:

Hobart Henley

Writer:

Maude Fulton

Cinematographer:

Ira Morgan

Editor:

Bob McLernon

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

Walter Hackett's play was also the basis for the 1923 M-G-M film Strangers of the Night , directed by Fred Niblo and starring Matt Moore and Enid Bennett (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; ... More Less

Walter Hackett's play was also the basis for the 1923 M-G-M film Strangers of the Night , directed by Fred Niblo and starring Matt Moore and Enid Bennett (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.5433). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
19 Apr 31
p. 10.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
Scr and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Captain Applejack by Walter Hackett (New York, 30 Dec 1921).
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 January 1931
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
12 January 1931
Copyright Number:
LP1891
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65
Length(in feet):
5,770
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Englishman Ambrose Applejohn, who is approaching his thirty-seventh birthday, decides to sell his ancestral castle, where he lives with his aunt Agatha and his American ward Poppy, and set off in search of adventure. That evening, after the women have gone to bed, the butler admits Anna Valeska, a beautiful Russian noblewoman, who explains that she is being pursued by Ivan Borolsky, a spy. Ambrose agrees to shelter her and, hearing a second knock, hides Anna and greets Mr. and Mrs. Pengard, who claim to have suffered an automobile accident. When Ambrose leaves the room for a moment, the Pengards unlock a window and leave. Then the butler announces a third visitor, Borolsky, who says he is looking for Anna, the woman who betrayed him. Ambrose refuses to turn Anna over, and Borolsky leaves, vowing to return. After Ambrose goes to bed, the Pengards enter through the unlocked window and discover a secret panel, but while opening it, they make a noise and have to leave in a hurry. Poppy and Ambrose investigate the noise, finding a parchment in the panel that reveals that Ambrose is a descendent of the notorious pirate, Captain Applejack, whose treasure is hidden in the castle. Poppy decides to make coffee, and Ambrose dozes off, and dreams of his swashbuckling ancestor. After Poppy wakes him, Anna enters, begging Ambrose to move the hidden jewels. Borolsky returns with a policeman, and after arguing with Ambrose, is left alone with Anna. The three, who are all thieves, join the Pengards, who have returned, in an effort to find the treasure. While they search, Ambrose's lawyer, John Mason, arrives, explaining ... +


Englishman Ambrose Applejohn, who is approaching his thirty-seventh birthday, decides to sell his ancestral castle, where he lives with his aunt Agatha and his American ward Poppy, and set off in search of adventure. That evening, after the women have gone to bed, the butler admits Anna Valeska, a beautiful Russian noblewoman, who explains that she is being pursued by Ivan Borolsky, a spy. Ambrose agrees to shelter her and, hearing a second knock, hides Anna and greets Mr. and Mrs. Pengard, who claim to have suffered an automobile accident. When Ambrose leaves the room for a moment, the Pengards unlock a window and leave. Then the butler announces a third visitor, Borolsky, who says he is looking for Anna, the woman who betrayed him. Ambrose refuses to turn Anna over, and Borolsky leaves, vowing to return. After Ambrose goes to bed, the Pengards enter through the unlocked window and discover a secret panel, but while opening it, they make a noise and have to leave in a hurry. Poppy and Ambrose investigate the noise, finding a parchment in the panel that reveals that Ambrose is a descendent of the notorious pirate, Captain Applejack, whose treasure is hidden in the castle. Poppy decides to make coffee, and Ambrose dozes off, and dreams of his swashbuckling ancestor. After Poppy wakes him, Anna enters, begging Ambrose to move the hidden jewels. Borolsky returns with a policeman, and after arguing with Ambrose, is left alone with Anna. The three, who are all thieves, join the Pengards, who have returned, in an effort to find the treasure. While they search, Ambrose's lawyer, John Mason, arrives, explaining that he hid the parchment to provide excitement for Ambrose. Under the seal of the parchment, Poppy discovers directions to another panel, where they find the treasure. Mason alerts the Coast Guard, who capture the criminals after a long chase. His need for adventure fulfilled, Ambrose proposes to Poppy. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.