The Finger Points (1931)

88 or 90 mins | Drama | 11 April 1931

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Editor:

LeRoy Stone

Production Designer:

Jack Okey

Production Company:

First National Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Var credits Noel Madison with the role of "Larry Hays." It is not known if he played another part in the completed film. Frank Lloyd is identified as the director in an early ad. MPH notes that the film was based on the killing of Chicago Tribune reporter Jake Lingle. Modern sources note that Lingle was shot the day before he was to meet federal agents investigating Al Capone's finances. He had been on Capone's ... More Less

Var credits Noel Madison with the role of "Larry Hays." It is not known if he played another part in the completed film. Frank Lloyd is identified as the director in an early ad. MPH notes that the film was based on the killing of Chicago Tribune reporter Jake Lingle. Modern sources note that Lingle was shot the day before he was to meet federal agents investigating Al Capone's finances. He had been on Capone's payroll. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
29 Mar 31
p. 10.
Motion Picture Herald
10 Jan 31
p. 40.
Motion Picture Herald
17 Jan 31
ad between pp. 18-19.
Motion Picture Herald
24 Jan 31
p. 22.
Motion Picture Herald
21 Mar 31
p. 42.
New York Times
28 Mar 31
p. 15.
Variety
8 Apr 31
p. 18.
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 April 1931
Production Date:
began 27 December 1930
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
16 April 1931
Copyright Number:
LP2181
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
88 or 90
Length(in feet):
7,920
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

One of Breckenridge Lee's first assignments as a reporter is to expose a newly opened gambling house. He refuses bribes to keep the story quiet and is severely beaten as a result. When he leaves the hospital, he plans to marry fellow reporter Marcia Collins, but his hospital and doctor bills combined with his low salary, make him think longingly of the bribes he turned down. Lee sets up an arrangement with gangster Louis Blanco, to inform his organization of city hall's plans. Blanco pays Lee well for his services and also provides him with tips for his column. Marcia grows suspicious of Lee's wealth and they quarrel over his refusal to explain the source of his money. Confident of his power, Lee decides to break away from Blanco to obtain a larger share of the graft. Learning that Number One, the head of the underworld, is planning to open a new gambling house, he tells Blanco that he will print the information because he believes the gang will not kill a reporter. He succeeds in obtaining a larger cut, but he is warned that if the story breaks he will be in trouble. Losing faith in Lee, Marcia reluctantly agrees to marry Charles "Breezy" Russell, another reporter, if he will stop drinking. Meanwhile, Lee decides to leave the city and go straight if Marcia will marry him immediately. She agrees and as Lee is getting ready, Breezy breaks the gambling story, hoping to impress Marcia and his editor. The next morning Breezy shows Marcia the newspaper with his story. When Lee sees it, he knows he is doomed. Despite ... +


One of Breckenridge Lee's first assignments as a reporter is to expose a newly opened gambling house. He refuses bribes to keep the story quiet and is severely beaten as a result. When he leaves the hospital, he plans to marry fellow reporter Marcia Collins, but his hospital and doctor bills combined with his low salary, make him think longingly of the bribes he turned down. Lee sets up an arrangement with gangster Louis Blanco, to inform his organization of city hall's plans. Blanco pays Lee well for his services and also provides him with tips for his column. Marcia grows suspicious of Lee's wealth and they quarrel over his refusal to explain the source of his money. Confident of his power, Lee decides to break away from Blanco to obtain a larger share of the graft. Learning that Number One, the head of the underworld, is planning to open a new gambling house, he tells Blanco that he will print the information because he believes the gang will not kill a reporter. He succeeds in obtaining a larger cut, but he is warned that if the story breaks he will be in trouble. Losing faith in Lee, Marcia reluctantly agrees to marry Charles "Breezy" Russell, another reporter, if he will stop drinking. Meanwhile, Lee decides to leave the city and go straight if Marcia will marry him immediately. She agrees and as Lee is getting ready, Breezy breaks the gambling story, hoping to impress Marcia and his editor. The next morning Breezy shows Marcia the newspaper with his story. When Lee sees it, he knows he is doomed. Despite Marcia's pleas, he leaves for the bank but is followed and killed. At his funeral, Lee is called a hero. Marcia, who knows the truth, keeps silent. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Gangster, Newspaper


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.