The King's Vacation (1933)

60 or 62 mins | Comedy | 25 February 1933

Director:

John G. Adolfi

Writer:

Ernest Pascal

Cinematographer:

James Van Trees

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

Anton Grot

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
20 Jan 1933
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jan 1933
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
28 Jan 1933
pp. 24-25
New York Times
20 Jan 1933
p. 21
Variety
24 Jan 1933
p. 19
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 February 1933
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 19 Jan 1933
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
24 February 1933
LP3674
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60 or 62
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

King Phillip is bored with court routine and realizes how expensive it is for the common people to support the royal family. He is upset that his ceremonial role does not enable him to act on his country's behalf, as it was in order to help his country that he gave up his wife and child years before to ascend the throne. After an attempted assassination convinces him to abdicate for the country's good and his own, his queen, Margaret, encourages him to return to his first wife Helen, whom he married morganatically and had to divorce eighteen years earlier in order to become king. When he demurs, Margaret leads him to believe that she was once in love with someone else, too. Eagerly, Phillip journeys to France to visit Helen. He is surprised to find that she no longer lives in their simple cottage, but has purchased an enormous palace. Expecting an intimate lunch with Helen and their daughter Millicent, who was three months old when he left, Phillip is disappointed to see that Helen has invited many people to meet him. Helen tells Phillip that Millicent is in love with a mechanic, John Kent, of whom she disapproves. Phillip meets John by accident during a trip to his old home and, after a demonstration of John's invention, is convinced that he is a talented inventor. He cannot change Helen's mind about the young man, however. As they are to remarry, Helen asks Phillip for the gift of an expensive tiara. On the trip he takes to purchase it, Phillip runs into Margaret, and she invites him to ...

More Less

King Phillip is bored with court routine and realizes how expensive it is for the common people to support the royal family. He is upset that his ceremonial role does not enable him to act on his country's behalf, as it was in order to help his country that he gave up his wife and child years before to ascend the throne. After an attempted assassination convinces him to abdicate for the country's good and his own, his queen, Margaret, encourages him to return to his first wife Helen, whom he married morganatically and had to divorce eighteen years earlier in order to become king. When he demurs, Margaret leads him to believe that she was once in love with someone else, too. Eagerly, Phillip journeys to France to visit Helen. He is surprised to find that she no longer lives in their simple cottage, but has purchased an enormous palace. Expecting an intimate lunch with Helen and their daughter Millicent, who was three months old when he left, Phillip is disappointed to see that Helen has invited many people to meet him. Helen tells Phillip that Millicent is in love with a mechanic, John Kent, of whom she disapproves. Phillip meets John by accident during a trip to his old home and, after a demonstration of John's invention, is convinced that he is a talented inventor. He cannot change Helen's mind about the young man, however. As they are to remarry, Helen asks Phillip for the gift of an expensive tiara. On the trip he takes to purchase it, Phillip runs into Margaret, and she invites him to visit her at her new home. He learns that she was never in love with another man and spends such a pleasant afternoon with her that he misses his train and wires Helen that he will be home late. Helen does not want to miss a party that night, so she is escorted there by Mac Barstow. Meanwhile, the royalists in Phillip's country beg him to return as their king. They are now willing to accept Helen as queen, and Helen is eager to return to the palace. Phillip, on the other hand, suggests that they sell the palace and return to their cottage. When Mac calls on Helen to tell her he is leaving forever because they cannot be together, Phillip realizes that Helen is in love with him. He suggests that they part as friends and returns to Margaret, whom he has come to love and with whom he intends to live a simple life.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

The White Tower

Contemporary news items add the following information about the production: RKO purchased James Ramsey Ullman's novel in Mar 1946 for $150,000. At that time, Edward Dmytryk was assigned to ... >>

The Wizard of Oz

The following dedication appears in the opening credits: “For nearly forty years this story has given faithful service to the Young in Heart; and Time has been powerless to ... >>

Tight Spot

The working title of this film was Dead Pidgeon . Doye O'Dell appears throughout the film in a running "gag" as a TV telethon host, satirizing the ... >>

King of Jazz

The 4 Jan 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World announced that the production starting date was 4 Nov 1929.
       The main title credits Paul Whiteman and his Band as "Exclusive ... >>

All Quiet on the Western Front

The opening title card reads: "Carl Laemmle presents All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque ." After the opening credits, the following written prologue ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.