Ladies They Talk About (1933)

64 or 68 mins | Drama | 4 February 1933

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HISTORY

According to Var , the play was produced in Los Angeles with Dorothy Mackaye in the lead. Modern sources list additional players as William Keighley, Isabel Withers, Harry C. Bradley, Davison Clark, Ferris Taylor and Helen ... More Less

According to Var , the play was produced in Los Angeles with Dorothy Mackaye in the lead. Modern sources list additional players as William Keighley, Isabel Withers, Harry C. Bradley, Davison Clark, Ferris Taylor and Helen Dickson. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
25 Feb 33
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Dec 32
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
7 Jan 33
p. 26.
New York Times
25 Feb 33
p. 20.
Variety
28 Feb 33
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Ladies They Talk About by Dorothy Mackaye and Carlton Miles (Los Angeles, production date undetermined).
SONGS
"If I Could Be with You," music by James P. Johnson, lyrics by Henry Creamer
"St. Louis Blues," music and lyrics by W. C. Handy.
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 February 1933
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
64 or 68
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Nan Taylor is arrested after acting as a decoy during a bank robbery. David Slade, a radio evangelist who has been calling publicly for tougher prosecution of criminals, recognizes Nan as a former classmate whose father was the deacon in the town where Slade's father was the town drunk. Taking advantage of his obvious attraction to her, Nan protests her innocence and begs for his help. Walter Simpson, the district attorney, agrees to parole her to Slade's care, although he is skeptical about her claims. When she confesses to Slade that she actually was involved in the robbery, however, Slade withdraws his support and Nan is sentenced to prison. In prison, she refuses to see Slade despite his frequent pleas, thereby attracting the hatred of fellow prisoner Susie, who is jealous of Slade's interest in Nan. After Nan learns that Don and Dutch, members of her gang, have been arrested, she agrees to see Slade in order to further their escape plans. She slips a letter into Slade's pocket which contains vital information about the plot, and through no fault of Slade's, the letter falls into the hands of the police and the escape fails. Nan's parole is denied because of her part in the crime, during which both Don and Dutch were killed. She believes that Slade betrayed her, so when she is finally released, she hunts him down, intending to kill him. Pretending to be sorry for her crimes, she meets with him privately, and then shoots him. Instantly remorseful, she apologizes, and when the police arrive, Slade tells them that he and Nan are getting ... +


Nan Taylor is arrested after acting as a decoy during a bank robbery. David Slade, a radio evangelist who has been calling publicly for tougher prosecution of criminals, recognizes Nan as a former classmate whose father was the deacon in the town where Slade's father was the town drunk. Taking advantage of his obvious attraction to her, Nan protests her innocence and begs for his help. Walter Simpson, the district attorney, agrees to parole her to Slade's care, although he is skeptical about her claims. When she confesses to Slade that she actually was involved in the robbery, however, Slade withdraws his support and Nan is sentenced to prison. In prison, she refuses to see Slade despite his frequent pleas, thereby attracting the hatred of fellow prisoner Susie, who is jealous of Slade's interest in Nan. After Nan learns that Don and Dutch, members of her gang, have been arrested, she agrees to see Slade in order to further their escape plans. She slips a letter into Slade's pocket which contains vital information about the plot, and through no fault of Slade's, the letter falls into the hands of the police and the escape fails. Nan's parole is denied because of her part in the crime, during which both Don and Dutch were killed. She believes that Slade betrayed her, so when she is finally released, she hunts him down, intending to kill him. Pretending to be sorry for her crimes, she meets with him privately, and then shoots him. Instantly remorseful, she apologizes, and when the police arrive, Slade tells them that he and Nan are getting married. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.