Kind Lady (1935)

76-78 or 85 mins | Drama | 6 December 1935

Director:

George B. Seitz

Producer:

Lucien Hubbard

Cinematographer:

George Folsey

Editor:

Hugh Wynn

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

A HR pre-production news item indicated that Constance Collier was originally cast in the title role. HR pre-release news items list Edward Mortimer and Lotus Thompson in the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. HR production charts credit Charles Clarke as the photographer of this film, and list actors Robert Greig and Marjorie Gateson in the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. According to a contemporary NYT news item, M-G-M paid $35,000 for the film rights to this story. A 1951 M-G-M remake of Kind Lady was directed by John Sturges and starred Ethel Barrymore and Maurice Evans. On 2 Dec 1949, the CBS television network aired a live Ford Theatre teleplay of Kind Lady , which was also directed by Sturges and starred Fay Bainter and Joseph Schildkraut. A Broadway Television Theatre production of Kind Lady , starring Sylvia Sidney, was broadcast on non-network television on 30 Nov ... More Less

A HR pre-production news item indicated that Constance Collier was originally cast in the title role. HR pre-release news items list Edward Mortimer and Lotus Thompson in the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. HR production charts credit Charles Clarke as the photographer of this film, and list actors Robert Greig and Marjorie Gateson in the cast, but their participation in the final film has not been confirmed. According to a contemporary NYT news item, M-G-M paid $35,000 for the film rights to this story. A 1951 M-G-M remake of Kind Lady was directed by John Sturges and starred Ethel Barrymore and Maurice Evans. On 2 Dec 1949, the CBS television network aired a live Ford Theatre teleplay of Kind Lady , which was also directed by Sturges and starred Fay Bainter and Joseph Schildkraut. A Broadway Television Theatre production of Kind Lady , starring Sylvia Sidney, was broadcast on non-network television on 30 Nov 1953. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
27 Nov 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
27 Dec 35
p 4.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 35
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Oct 35
p. 2, 4, 6
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 35
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Nov 35
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Nov 35
p. 4.
Motion Picture Daily
29 Nov 35
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
7 Dec 35
p. 68.
New York Times
17-May-36
---
Variety
1 Jan 36
p. 58.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Silver Mask" by Hugh Walpole in Harper's Bazaar (Mar 1932), and the play Kind Lady by Edward Chodorov (New York, 23 Apr 1935).
SONGS
"The Duchess Has a Twinkle in Her Eye," music and lyrics by Bronislau Kaper and Walter Jurmann.
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 December 1935
Production Date:
28 October--20 November 1935
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
5 December 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5997
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
76-78 or 85
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1806
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In London, Mary Herries, a wealthy and kindly old maid who lives in a large mansion, shows her Christmas spirit by inviting homeless artist Henry Abbott into her home for some tea. Henry, a confidence artist, graciously accepts Mary's offer, but soon exploits Mary's generosity by staying for a sandwich and a cigarette. Lucy Weston, Mary's sister, who has come to take Mary to a Herries Christmas reunion in the country, leaves when Mary complains that she is not well enough to travel. After accepting Mary's hospitality, Henry admires her art collection, and she realizes that he has an educated eye for paintings. Rose, Mary's maid, is uneasy about the strange man, and after he leaves, she tells her mistress that he is too good-looking to be begging for tea, and that surely he is up to no good. When Mary notices that her silver cigarette case is missing, she considers the possibility that Henry stole it, but dismisses the thought as soon as Rose agrees with her. Following a visit by Phyllis, Mary's niece, and her fiancé, Peter Santard, Mary is visited by Henry, who has come to return her cigarette case and apologize for pawning it. Henry then begs Mary to buy one of his paintings, which she does, before asking him to leave and never return. Disregarding her request, Henry plays on Mary's sympathy by showing her the pathetic sight of a poor woman holding a baby outside her window in the rain, and telling her that the woman, named Ada, is his wife, and that the baby is theirs. Mary takes pity on them, invites them in, ... +


In London, Mary Herries, a wealthy and kindly old maid who lives in a large mansion, shows her Christmas spirit by inviting homeless artist Henry Abbott into her home for some tea. Henry, a confidence artist, graciously accepts Mary's offer, but soon exploits Mary's generosity by staying for a sandwich and a cigarette. Lucy Weston, Mary's sister, who has come to take Mary to a Herries Christmas reunion in the country, leaves when Mary complains that she is not well enough to travel. After accepting Mary's hospitality, Henry admires her art collection, and she realizes that he has an educated eye for paintings. Rose, Mary's maid, is uneasy about the strange man, and after he leaves, she tells her mistress that he is too good-looking to be begging for tea, and that surely he is up to no good. When Mary notices that her silver cigarette case is missing, she considers the possibility that Henry stole it, but dismisses the thought as soon as Rose agrees with her. Following a visit by Phyllis, Mary's niece, and her fiancé, Peter Santard, Mary is visited by Henry, who has come to return her cigarette case and apologize for pawning it. Henry then begs Mary to buy one of his paintings, which she does, before asking him to leave and never return. Disregarding her request, Henry plays on Mary's sympathy by showing her the pathetic sight of a poor woman holding a baby outside her window in the rain, and telling her that the woman, named Ada, is his wife, and that the baby is theirs. Mary takes pity on them, invites them in, and then sends Henry to get a doctor to treat Ada's exposure. The kind lady agrees to let the Abbotts stay until Ada recovers, but Henry again takes advantage of her and invites the Edwardses, friends of Ada's, to move in also to Mary's house. Shortly thereafter, Mary decides to rid herself of her unwelcome guests by telling them that she has decided to take a vacation in America, and that she plans to close down the house while she is away. After sending Lucy a letter informing her of her vacation plans, Mary arranges to have Ada taken to hospital. The Abbotts refuse to leave, and together with the Edwardses and a doctor, they conspire to fleece Mary. Henry tries to fool Rose into leaving the house, but when he later discovers her still inside he kills her. Henry, Ada, the doctor and the Edwardses keep Mary in her house at gunpoint, and when Mr. Roubet, a French art dealer, visits, she tries to alert him as to her situation by slipping him a note while her captors are out of sight. Her attempt fails, however, when Roubet turns the note over to Henry on his way out. When the Santards pay Mary an unexpected visit, Mrs. Edwards answers the door and lies to them about the kind lady's whereabouts, telling them that she has gone to America. Later, Peter's suspicions are raised when Lucy tells him that she has not received any word from her sister, and that Mary had terrible guests at her home when she last saw her. When Peter discovers that Mary has neither applied for a passport nor set sail from England, he goes to the constable and tries to obtain a search warrant for the house, but his request is denied because he is not a police officer. Meanwhile, Mr. Foster, a representative from Mary's bank, prepares to sign papers that will turn over all of Mary's assets to Henry. Before they sign, Mary succeeds in slipping him a note explaining her distress, but when Henry and the doctor discover that Foster has been tipped off by Mary, they close in on him and prevent him from leaving. Peter eventually succeeds in getting the police to raid Mary's house, which they do in time to prevent Mary's captors from stealing her money. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.