The Gay Bride (1934)

80 or 82 mins | Comedy | 14 December 1934

Director:

Jack Conway

Cinematographer:

Ray June

Editor:

Frank Sullivan

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Repeal. According to a Feb 1934 HR news item, Jean Harlow was first considered for the female lead in the film, while a pre-production HR news items states that Clark Gable was first considered for the male lead. After Gable was considered, Lyle Talbot, Ricardo Cortez, Russell Hardie and Richard Arlen were tested for the part before Chester Morris finally was cast. According to HR news items, Una Merkel was assigned to play "Mirabelle" in the film after beating out Isabel Jewell for the part. Neither Merkel nor Jewell appear in the final film, however. ...

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The working title of this film was Repeal. According to a Feb 1934 HR news item, Jean Harlow was first considered for the female lead in the film, while a pre-production HR news items states that Clark Gable was first considered for the male lead. After Gable was considered, Lyle Talbot, Ricardo Cortez, Russell Hardie and Richard Arlen were tested for the part before Chester Morris finally was cast. According to HR news items, Una Merkel was assigned to play "Mirabelle" in the film after beating out Isabel Jewell for the part. Neither Merkel nor Jewell appear in the final film, however.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 Nov 1934
p. 3
Film Daily
15 Dec 1934
p. 3
HF
29 Sep 1934
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
14 Feb 1934
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
19 Sep 1934
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
21 Sep 1934
pp. 2-3
Hollywood Reporter
23 Oct 1934
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1934
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
17 Nov 1934
p. 49
New York Times
19 Dec 1934
p. 27
Variety
18 Dec 1934
p. 13
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Repeal by Charles Francis Coe in The Saturday Evening Post (9 Dec 1933--13 Jan 1934).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Repeal
Release Date:
14 December 1934
Production Date:
20 Sep--23 Oct 1934
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro Goldwyn Mayer Corp.
15 November 1934
LP5110
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80 or 82
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
394
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When his girl friend Mary, a gold-digging chorus girl, demands that he marry her or lose her, New York bootlegger "Shoots" Magiz overcomes his fear of matrimony and proposes. On his way to the country wedding, however, Office Boy, Shoots's bodyguard and best man, is ambushed by rival racketeers, and the ceremony is delayed. Office Boy, whose real name is Jimmie Burnham, outsmarts his employer's competitors and rushes to the church to warn Shoots of their plot to kill him. Concerned for Mary's safety, Shoots cancels the wedding and instructs Office Boy to escort her back to New York, while he faces the bullets of his rivals. In spite of Office Boy's critical attitude toward her marriage plans, Mary arranges for a justice of the peace to marry her that night and manipulates the still nervous Shoots out of hiding. Before the marriage is consumated, Mary also arranges for her lawyer to draw up Shoots's will, stipulating that all of Shoots's assets will be left to her. Although Office Boy warns Shoots that, because of the new prohibition repeal law, his earnings have been slipping, Shoots refuses to cancel his European honeymoon and allows Mary to spend lavishly overseas. During Shoots's absence, two of his henchmen, Daniel J. Dingle and Mickey the Greek, plot to take over his bootlegging territory, but Shoots deduces their scheming and slips back to the city without telling them. Mary, meanwhile, starts to accumulate her own savings by selling a painting that Shoots purchased in Greece for a profit in New York and depositing the money in her private safe deposit box. Mary's savings plan is curtailed, however, ...

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When his girl friend Mary, a gold-digging chorus girl, demands that he marry her or lose her, New York bootlegger "Shoots" Magiz overcomes his fear of matrimony and proposes. On his way to the country wedding, however, Office Boy, Shoots's bodyguard and best man, is ambushed by rival racketeers, and the ceremony is delayed. Office Boy, whose real name is Jimmie Burnham, outsmarts his employer's competitors and rushes to the church to warn Shoots of their plot to kill him. Concerned for Mary's safety, Shoots cancels the wedding and instructs Office Boy to escort her back to New York, while he faces the bullets of his rivals. In spite of Office Boy's critical attitude toward her marriage plans, Mary arranges for a justice of the peace to marry her that night and manipulates the still nervous Shoots out of hiding. Before the marriage is consumated, Mary also arranges for her lawyer to draw up Shoots's will, stipulating that all of Shoots's assets will be left to her. Although Office Boy warns Shoots that, because of the new prohibition repeal law, his earnings have been slipping, Shoots refuses to cancel his European honeymoon and allows Mary to spend lavishly overseas. During Shoots's absence, two of his henchmen, Daniel J. Dingle and Mickey the Greek, plot to take over his bootlegging territory, but Shoots deduces their scheming and slips back to the city without telling them. Mary, meanwhile, starts to accumulate her own savings by selling a painting that Shoots purchased in Greece for a profit in New York and depositing the money in her private safe deposit box. Mary's savings plan is curtailed, however, when Shoots is finally exterminated by Dingle and the conditions of his will force Mary to assume his debts. Still the determined gold digger, Mary turns her charms on the lecherous Dingle, but stipulates that no marriage is possible without a paid-in-advance trust fund. To secure the trust fund, Dingle extorts money out of crooked politician Jim Smiley, but then is killed by Mickey, who also desires Mary. After Mary agrees to marry the now rich Mickey, however, she discovers that she and Office Boy have fallen in love and agrees to become his wife. In preparation for their marriage, Office Boy quits his bodyguard job and buys a garage in New Jersey. When Mary shows up with Mickey's stolen trust fund, however, he denounces her as a hopeless gold digger and breaks with her. To prove herself worthy, Mary, who is now wanted by both the police and Mickey, donates her trust fund to an eager bread line. Aware of Mickey's threats, Office Boy then rushes to find Mary in the city and, after being chased by police, faces Mickey in a gun battle and finally makes Mary his homemaker wife.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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