Rackety Rax (1932)

65, 70 or 75 mins | Comedy | 23 October 1932

Director:

Alfred Werker

Cinematographer:

L. W. O'Connell

Editor:

Robert Bischoff

Production Designer:

Gordon Wiles

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

Many of the football players who appeared in the film were well-known players at the time of the film's ... More Less

Many of the football players who appeared in the film were well-known players at the time of the film's release. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
2 Nov 32
p. 8.
HF
10 Sep 32
p. 12.
HF
24 Sep 32
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 32
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 32
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 32
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
29 Oct 32
p. 31.
New York Times
5 Nov 32
p. 12.
Variety
8 Nov 32
p. 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Vincent Barnett
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITERS
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story Rackety Rax by Joel Sayre in American Mercury (New York, Jan 1932).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Rackety Rax" and "The Puce and the Green," music by James F. Hanley, lyrics by L. Wolfe Gilbert.
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 October 1932
Production Date:
18 August--late September 1932
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
17 October 1932
Copyright Number:
LP3365
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65, 70 or 75
Length(in feet):
5,800
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Racketeer Frank "Knuckles" McGloin, head of McGloin Enterprises, is always looking for a new way to turn an easy buck. When offered the opportunity to get into the dog racing racket, however, he rejects it, saying that he only wants to be involved in "legitimate rackets." McGloin is aided in his crime racket by Mr. Sultsfeldt, who is in charge of the legal department, Sister Carrie, who oversees the welfare department, and Speed Bennett, who runs the publicity department. Following the defeat of a McGloin sponsored candidate in a local election, McGloin shoots Clarence "Horseface" Beamer, the staff member who failed to rig the election in his favor. When McGloin is tried for Horseface's murder, Sultsfeldt turns the proceedings into mayhem when he releases a flock of doves to prove his conviction that his client is a "loving man." The ploy works, however, and McGloin wins his freedom. Once he resumes his business, McGloin is forced to contend with Joe Gilotti, the head of a rival racketeering mob, who is muscling in on his territory. McGloin finds Gilotti at a football game, and warns him to stay out of McGloin territory. While at the football stadium, McGloin becomes so impressed with the high profits generated by the sport, that he decides to get in on it himself. At Sultzfeldt's suggestion, McGloin purchases the mortgage on Canarsie College and hires thugs to play on the school team. Voine, Knuckles' moll, picks out the team colors, and his nightclub dancers are made team cheerleaders. Former Sing-Sing inmate Brick Gilligan is hired as the team's coach, and he trains the boys to ... +


Racketeer Frank "Knuckles" McGloin, head of McGloin Enterprises, is always looking for a new way to turn an easy buck. When offered the opportunity to get into the dog racing racket, however, he rejects it, saying that he only wants to be involved in "legitimate rackets." McGloin is aided in his crime racket by Mr. Sultsfeldt, who is in charge of the legal department, Sister Carrie, who oversees the welfare department, and Speed Bennett, who runs the publicity department. Following the defeat of a McGloin sponsored candidate in a local election, McGloin shoots Clarence "Horseface" Beamer, the staff member who failed to rig the election in his favor. When McGloin is tried for Horseface's murder, Sultsfeldt turns the proceedings into mayhem when he releases a flock of doves to prove his conviction that his client is a "loving man." The ploy works, however, and McGloin wins his freedom. Once he resumes his business, McGloin is forced to contend with Joe Gilotti, the head of a rival racketeering mob, who is muscling in on his territory. McGloin finds Gilotti at a football game, and warns him to stay out of McGloin territory. While at the football stadium, McGloin becomes so impressed with the high profits generated by the sport, that he decides to get in on it himself. At Sultzfeldt's suggestion, McGloin purchases the mortgage on Canarsie College and hires thugs to play on the school team. Voine, Knuckles' moll, picks out the team colors, and his nightclub dancers are made team cheerleaders. Former Sing-Sing inmate Brick Gilligan is hired as the team's coach, and he trains the boys to play rough. Soon the team takes off on a winning streak, and McGloin corners the college football market. At the big Canarsie versus Lake Shore Tech game, Canarsie's star quarterback, Red, double-crosses his team and leaks the team's signals to Lake Shore Tech. While McGloin threatens his players with harm should they lose, Gilotti, who secretly owns the Lake Shore team under the name J. Scattergood Pemberton, orders his players to win the game to save the honor of his daughter, who was "wronged" by the Canarsie backfield. Prior to kick-off, McGloin learns that Gilotti is Lake Shore's real owner. The game gets off to a gangster-like start when the ball is snapped into the air and gunned down. Both sides immediately pull out their weapons, and a gas bomb is tossed into McGloin's huddle. As a bloody mobster battle rages on the field, Gilotti's car is rigged with explosives to prevent him from escaping alive. When the police break up the fight, Gilotti and McGloin make amends and decide to become partners. The two mob leaders are killed, however, when they drive off in Gilotti's car and the bomb explodes. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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