The Barbarian (1933)

82-83 or 88 mins | Drama, Romance | 12 May 1933

Director:

Sam Wood

Writer:

Edgar Selwyn

Cinematographer:

Harold Rosson

Editor:

Tom Held

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Man on the Nile. According to Myrna Loy's autobiography, some scenes for the film were shot in Yuma, AZ. Loy also notes that, during a scene in which she takes a rose petal bath, she was wearing a flesh-toned bodysuit. Although the script of this film is notably different from Jesse L. Lasky's 1915 silent, The Arab, which was directed by Cecil B. DeMille, Edgar Selwyn authored both films and used some of the same material in both productions (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20; F1.0133). In addition, M-G-M's 1924 remake of the 1915 film, which is also called The Arab, bears some resemblance to the 1933 picture. The Barbarian, however, is not a remake of these earlier pictures. Rex Ingram directed and Ramon Novarro and Alice Terry starred in the later silent film (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.0157). ...

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The working title of this film was Man on the Nile. According to Myrna Loy's autobiography, some scenes for the film were shot in Yuma, AZ. Loy also notes that, during a scene in which she takes a rose petal bath, she was wearing a flesh-toned bodysuit. Although the script of this film is notably different from Jesse L. Lasky's 1915 silent, The Arab, which was directed by Cecil B. DeMille, Edgar Selwyn authored both films and used some of the same material in both productions (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20; F1.0133). In addition, M-G-M's 1924 remake of the 1915 film, which is also called The Arab, bears some resemblance to the 1933 picture. The Barbarian, however, is not a remake of these earlier pictures. Rex Ingram directed and Ramon Novarro and Alice Terry starred in the later silent film (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.0157).

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
31 Mar 1933
p. 3
Film Daily
10 Nov 1932
p. 8
Film Daily
13 May 1933
p. 3
HF
4 Feb 1933
p. 12
International Photographer
1 Mar 1933
p. 20
Motion Picture Daily
13 May 1933
p. 16
Motion Picture Herald
15 Apr 1933
p. 29
New York Times
13 May 1933
p. 16
Variety
16 May 1933
p. 17
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Sam Wood Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Scr and dial
Scr and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
2d cam
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus score
Orch cond
SOUND
Rec dir
Mixer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Love Song of the Nile," words and music by Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Man on the Nile
Release Date:
12 May 1933
Production Date:
began early Feb 1933
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro Goldwyn Mayer Corp.
17 May 1933
LP3884
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
82-83 or 88
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

When Jamil El Shehab, a handsome, opportunistic Egyptian dragoman, spies Diana Standing, a beautiful half-English, half-Egyptian socialite, at the Cairo train station, he is determined to become her official guide and driver. Using Diana's dog Missy as bait, Jamil maneuvers himself into the job over the objections of her pompous English fiancé, businessman Gerald Hume. Then, as she dines and tours the Pyramids, Jamil tricks Gerald into leaving Diana and woos her with love songs and pretty flattery. Also vying for Diana's attention is Pasha Achmed, Gerald's unscrupulous Egyptian business partner. To be alone with Diana, Pasha arranges for Gerald to be sent on a phony mission to the aqueduct project he and Gerald are building in the desert. Aware of Pasha's scheming, Jamil blackmails his countryman and uses his servant position to work his way into Diana's hotel bedroom. After Jamil kisses her in a moment of bold passion, however, Diana dismisses him and starts on a caravan for Gerald. During the journey through the desert, Jamil appears and forcefully replaces Diana's guide. Once again, Diana falls under the spell of Jamil's romantic singing and finds herself in his arms. Outraged by his embraces, Diana strikes Jamil with a whip and orders the caravan to return immediately to Cairo. On the way back, however, Jamil sends Powers, Diana's chaperone, and the rest of the caravan on one route, while conniving to get Diana to Pasha's oasis retreat via another. At the oasis, Diana receives royal treatment until Pasha, on word from Jamil that Diana went to his place deliberately, attacks her. After Diana screams for Jamil to save ...

More Less

When Jamil El Shehab, a handsome, opportunistic Egyptian dragoman, spies Diana Standing, a beautiful half-English, half-Egyptian socialite, at the Cairo train station, he is determined to become her official guide and driver. Using Diana's dog Missy as bait, Jamil maneuvers himself into the job over the objections of her pompous English fiancé, businessman Gerald Hume. Then, as she dines and tours the Pyramids, Jamil tricks Gerald into leaving Diana and woos her with love songs and pretty flattery. Also vying for Diana's attention is Pasha Achmed, Gerald's unscrupulous Egyptian business partner. To be alone with Diana, Pasha arranges for Gerald to be sent on a phony mission to the aqueduct project he and Gerald are building in the desert. Aware of Pasha's scheming, Jamil blackmails his countryman and uses his servant position to work his way into Diana's hotel bedroom. After Jamil kisses her in a moment of bold passion, however, Diana dismisses him and starts on a caravan for Gerald. During the journey through the desert, Jamil appears and forcefully replaces Diana's guide. Once again, Diana falls under the spell of Jamil's romantic singing and finds herself in his arms. Outraged by his embraces, Diana strikes Jamil with a whip and orders the caravan to return immediately to Cairo. On the way back, however, Jamil sends Powers, Diana's chaperone, and the rest of the caravan on one route, while conniving to get Diana to Pasha's oasis retreat via another. At the oasis, Diana receives royal treatment until Pasha, on word from Jamil that Diana went to his place deliberately, attacks her. After Diana screams for Jamil to save her from Pasha, Jamil abducts her from his rival's house during the night. In the desert the next day, Pasha's henchmen threaten to reclaim Diana but are killed by Jamil. With only one horse between them, Jamil forces Diana to walk behind him as they continue their trek, then prevents her from drinking from a desert pond until both the horse and he have drunk. Defeated by thirst, hunger and humiliation, Diana gives in to Jamil's forced advances that night and allows him to take her to his tribal village the next day. There Jamil reveals that he is actually a sheik who chose to work as a dragoman as part of his royal training. Although Diana passively agrees to become Jamil's wife, she tosses the ceremonial water in his face during the wedding and humiliates him in front of his father and his tribe. Devastated by Diana's actions, Jamil allows her to return to Cairo, where she immediately proceeds with her marriage to Gerald. Moments before she is to wed Gerald, however, Diana is visted by Jamil, now a fugitive from the Egyptian army. When Jamil begins to sing his love song, Diana realizes that she truly loves him and abandons Gerald at the altar. As they float down the Nile together, Diana confesses her parentage to Jamil, who tells her that he would love her even if her mother was Chinese.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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