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HISTORY

A news item in HR on 9 Sep 1933 states that Paramount had planned to "brave possible criticism and sign Sally Rand, Chicago's fan girl," to appear in Search for Beauty, but she was not in the film. As reported in HR on 16 Oct 1933, Jack Haskell was set to direct musical numbers; however, he is not credited on the film or in any reviews, and it is unclear whether or not he worked on the film. This film includes a newsreel of the 1932 Olympic Games in Los Angeles. Paramount's United States--United Kingdom beauty contest mentioned in the opening credits was a studio exploitation stunt which promised its winners a free trip to Hollywood and a chance to appear in one film.
       Search for Beauty marked the American motion picture debut of British actress Ida Lupino (1914--1995). The HR review stated, "Ida Lupino shows what she had to make herself a musical comedy star in England." Actress Ann Sheridan (1915--1967) also made her motion picture debut in the film in a bit role as one of the contest winners at "Health Acres." At the time, she was known as Clara Lou Sheridan. ...

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A news item in HR on 9 Sep 1933 states that Paramount had planned to "brave possible criticism and sign Sally Rand, Chicago's fan girl," to appear in Search for Beauty, but she was not in the film. As reported in HR on 16 Oct 1933, Jack Haskell was set to direct musical numbers; however, he is not credited on the film or in any reviews, and it is unclear whether or not he worked on the film. This film includes a newsreel of the 1932 Olympic Games in Los Angeles. Paramount's United States--United Kingdom beauty contest mentioned in the opening credits was a studio exploitation stunt which promised its winners a free trip to Hollywood and a chance to appear in one film.
       Search for Beauty marked the American motion picture debut of British actress Ida Lupino (1914--1995). The HR review stated, "Ida Lupino shows what she had to make herself a musical comedy star in England." Actress Ann Sheridan (1915--1967) also made her motion picture debut in the film in a bit role as one of the contest winners at "Health Acres." At the time, she was known as Clara Lou Sheridan.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Dec 1933
p. 3
Film Daily
10 Feb 1934
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
9 Sep 1933
p. 9
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 1933
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
28 Oct 1933
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jan 1934
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jan 1934
pp. 4-5
Motion Picture Daily
1 Jan 1934
p. 8
Motion Picture Herald
20 Jan 1934
p. 56
New York Times
10 Feb 1934
p. 20
Variety
13 Feb 1934
p. 14
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Mus
SOUND
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Love Your Body by Schuyler E. Grey and Paul R. Milton (production undetermined).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
SONGS
by Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin.
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 February 1934
Production Date:
began late Oct 1933
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Paramount Productions, Inc.
2 February 1934
LP4458
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75 or 77
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Larry Williams and Jean Strange are both released from prison after taking the rap for an oil stock scam while their accomplice, Dan Healy, profited. Larry quickly develops a scheme to recruit British Olympic swimming champion Barbara Hilton and American champion Don Jackson, who are sweethearts, as editors for a revived health and fitness magazine, with Healy as publisher. Along with the purchase of the magazine comes Health Acres, an overgrown resort and ten-acre farm. Barbara and Don soon discover Williams and Healy aim to increase circulation by printing titillating composite photos of women and by taking ads from health quacks. Don counters their efforts by sponsoring an international beauty and health contest, giving his word to contestants that his operation is legitimate. Barbara calls Don home from Europe when she finds Williams and Healy printing torrid sex stories in the magazine and her cousin Sally relishing them. Although Barbara and ethics committee member Reverend Rankin vote to censor the stories, they lose, and circulation triples. Don's moral arguments eventually cause Healy to give him a controlling interest in Health Acres and the money to fix it up in exchange for Don's stock in the magazine. Don and Barbara then refurbish the resort and invite the winners of the contest to perform in the opening pageant and act as health instructors for the guests. Jean makes herself indispensable during the remodelling and Don gives her ten-percent interest in Health Acres. At the opening, Healy and Williams try to taint the resort's reputation by distributing racy pictures of women to the male patrons, while Jean excites the female clientele with photos of handsomely built men. ...

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Larry Williams and Jean Strange are both released from prison after taking the rap for an oil stock scam while their accomplice, Dan Healy, profited. Larry quickly develops a scheme to recruit British Olympic swimming champion Barbara Hilton and American champion Don Jackson, who are sweethearts, as editors for a revived health and fitness magazine, with Healy as publisher. Along with the purchase of the magazine comes Health Acres, an overgrown resort and ten-acre farm. Barbara and Don soon discover Williams and Healy aim to increase circulation by printing titillating composite photos of women and by taking ads from health quacks. Don counters their efforts by sponsoring an international beauty and health contest, giving his word to contestants that his operation is legitimate. Barbara calls Don home from Europe when she finds Williams and Healy printing torrid sex stories in the magazine and her cousin Sally relishing them. Although Barbara and ethics committee member Reverend Rankin vote to censor the stories, they lose, and circulation triples. Don's moral arguments eventually cause Healy to give him a controlling interest in Health Acres and the money to fix it up in exchange for Don's stock in the magazine. Don and Barbara then refurbish the resort and invite the winners of the contest to perform in the opening pageant and act as health instructors for the guests. Jean makes herself indispensable during the remodelling and Don gives her ten-percent interest in Health Acres. At the opening, Healy and Williams try to taint the resort's reputation by distributing racy pictures of women to the male patrons, while Jean excites the female clientele with photos of handsomely built men. After the pageant, in which the international athletes perform exercises in unison to music, the patrons invite them to parties in their rooms. When Barbara finds Sally dancing in her underwear for a group of drunken guests, she saves Sally by taking her place, and is unable to free herself from lurid demands that she continue to rumba. Two male athletes tell Don about the party and a group of them break it up. Barbara, who has felt threatened by Don's attentions toward Jean, breaks her partnership with him, but he proposes and they kiss. Williams, who sees them kissing gives Jean a call, awakening her, so that she sees Don and Barbara in the moonlight. The next morning, all the guests are dragged out of bed for calisthenics. When Williams and Healy refuse to comply, they call a stock vote and Jean sides with them. Barbara then reveals that Jean's ten-percent was only for the company, not the farm. She drew up the contract with the help of Rankin, who is really from the Department of Justice. Healy, Williams, and Jean are then forced to exercise, while Williams proclaims that he has come upon another great idea.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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