The Night Is Young (1935)

78, 80 or 82 mins | Drama, Musical | 11 January 1935

Director:

Dudley Murphy

Producer:

Harry Rapf

Cinematographer:

James Wong Howe

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

This film marked the American screen debut of European musical comedy performer Evelyn Laye, who returned to Britain permanently following her work in the picture. Although a HR production chart lists Stuart Erwin in the cast, his appearance in the released film is doubtful. Soon after production on this picture began, HR announced the addition of actors Chico De Verdi and Art Berry to the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been determined. A HR pre-release news item indicates that star Ramon Novarro and director Dudley Murphy were involved in some minor disputes during production, including one in which Novarro "blew up" when Murphy informed him that he would not be permitted to come down from his seat on a ferris wheel, where he was to spend most of the day for the filming of a scene. Following this picture, Novarro's contract to do another film for M-G-M, entitled Love While You May , was "abrogated by mutual consent," making this his last picture for the studio until 1950, when he was cast in The Outriders . According to another HR news item, due to the fact that the action of the film is "so completely wedded to the music, the entire script was mimeographed on special music paper, with the action and dialogue inserted between the staves and timed to each measure." An unidentified source in the AMPAS production file for The Night Is Young credits Henry Grace with the set decoration, along with Edwin B. ... More Less

This film marked the American screen debut of European musical comedy performer Evelyn Laye, who returned to Britain permanently following her work in the picture. Although a HR production chart lists Stuart Erwin in the cast, his appearance in the released film is doubtful. Soon after production on this picture began, HR announced the addition of actors Chico De Verdi and Art Berry to the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been determined. A HR pre-release news item indicates that star Ramon Novarro and director Dudley Murphy were involved in some minor disputes during production, including one in which Novarro "blew up" when Murphy informed him that he would not be permitted to come down from his seat on a ferris wheel, where he was to spend most of the day for the filming of a scene. Following this picture, Novarro's contract to do another film for M-G-M, entitled Love While You May , was "abrogated by mutual consent," making this his last picture for the studio until 1950, when he was cast in The Outriders . According to another HR news item, due to the fact that the action of the film is "so completely wedded to the music, the entire script was mimeographed on special music paper, with the action and dialogue inserted between the staves and timed to each measure." An unidentified source in the AMPAS production file for The Night Is Young credits Henry Grace with the set decoration, along with Edwin B. Willis. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Dec 34
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 Jan 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Oct 34
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Oct 34
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Oct 34
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 34
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Nov 34
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 34
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jan 35
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
10 Nov 34
p. 46.
Motion Picture Herald
29 Dec 34
p. 59.
MPSI
1 Apr 35
p. 21.
New York Times
14 Jan 35
p. 11.
Variety
15 Jan 35
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus cond
Orch and mus score dir by
SOUND
Rec dir
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Night Is Young," "When I Grow Too Old to Dream," "My Old Mare," "The Noble Duchess," "There's a Riot in Havana" and "Lift Your Glass," music by Sigmund Romberg, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II.
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 January 1935
Production Date:
began early October 1934
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 January 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5248
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78, 80 or 82
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
516
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When ballerina Fanni learns that the Vienese archduke, Paul Gustave, is expected to be in the audience of her next performance, she immediately makes plans to court the wealthy bachelor and spurn Willy Fitch, her sweetheart. Though Fanni assures her friend and fellow dancer Lisl Gluck that her pursuit of the archduke will be done strictly in the name of "patriotism," Lisl advises her to stick with Willy, a carriage driver. As planned, the handsome Paul spies the lovely ballerinas on stage, but instead of choosing Fanni, he becomes interested in Lisl. Paul, who is expected to marry Countess Rafay, is informed that for state reasons the marriage cannot take place for another six months. Seizing this opportunity, Paul decides to keep young Lisl as his secret lover during that time. Lisl, who is engaged to Toni, a failing ballet producer, is invited to attend a dinner at Paul's villa by his valet, Szereny, and though she rejects the offer, the valet tells her that she must accept the invitation. Fanny, upon learning that the archduke has passed her over in favor of her friend, tells Willy that she is now available for marriage. Willy, however, shows little enthusiasm for marriage, and sings a song in which he praises the virtues of his horse "Mitzi" instead of those of his wife-to-be. When Lisl arrives at the archduke'e palace, she is subjected to a rigorous physical inspection by Szereny to insure that she meets Paul's requirements, an examination that she finds offensive and degrading. When she finally meets Paul, he is less than amorous and immediately tells her that his relationship with her ... +


When ballerina Fanni learns that the Vienese archduke, Paul Gustave, is expected to be in the audience of her next performance, she immediately makes plans to court the wealthy bachelor and spurn Willy Fitch, her sweetheart. Though Fanni assures her friend and fellow dancer Lisl Gluck that her pursuit of the archduke will be done strictly in the name of "patriotism," Lisl advises her to stick with Willy, a carriage driver. As planned, the handsome Paul spies the lovely ballerinas on stage, but instead of choosing Fanni, he becomes interested in Lisl. Paul, who is expected to marry Countess Rafay, is informed that for state reasons the marriage cannot take place for another six months. Seizing this opportunity, Paul decides to keep young Lisl as his secret lover during that time. Lisl, who is engaged to Toni, a failing ballet producer, is invited to attend a dinner at Paul's villa by his valet, Szereny, and though she rejects the offer, the valet tells her that she must accept the invitation. Fanny, upon learning that the archduke has passed her over in favor of her friend, tells Willy that she is now available for marriage. Willy, however, shows little enthusiasm for marriage, and sings a song in which he praises the virtues of his horse "Mitzi" instead of those of his wife-to-be. When Lisl arrives at the archduke'e palace, she is subjected to a rigorous physical inspection by Szereny to insure that she meets Paul's requirements, an examination that she finds offensive and degrading. When she finally meets Paul, he is less than amorous and immediately tells her that his relationship with her will have nothing to do with love, and that she will be expected to live in special quarters in the house and not disturb him. Paul is surprised, however, to learn that Lisl is not interested in making love to him either. Later, when Paul spends an evening out with the Countess Rafay, the lonely Lisl invites Toni and Willy to visit her. Upon his return, the ill-tempered archduke prepares to admonish her for conducting such merriment in his home, but softens when he hears her sing. A romance between Paul and Lisl soon blooms when the two are stranded on a carnival ferris wheel and are forced to spend the night together. The next day, the lovers are visited by the jealous Toni, who accuses Lisl of walking out on their planned marriage. However, Toni immediately permits Lisl to resume her romance with Paul when he learns that the archduke intends to finance his ballet. Though Paul is willing to sacrifice his title in order to get out of his arranged marriage to Countess Rafay and marry Lisl, the emperor insists that the arranged marriage take place. When Paul informs Lisl that he must leave her, Szereny consoles the devastated Lisl, and following a tearful farewell dinner, Paul asks Lisl to kiss him and then turn around and never look back. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.