The Countess of Monte Cristo (1934)

78 or 80 mins | Comedy-drama | 19 March 1934

Director:

Karl Freund

Editor:

Philip Cahn

Production Designer:

Stanley Fleischer

Production Company:

Universal Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Screen credits were taken from the studio continuity. The continuity notes that Patsy Kelly appeared courtesy of Hal Roach. The Ufa film was directed by Karl Hartl and starred Brigette Helm. In 1948, Frederick de Cordova remade the film for Universal-International, starring Sonja Henie. ...

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Screen credits were taken from the studio continuity. The continuity notes that Patsy Kelly appeared courtesy of Hal Roach. The Ufa film was directed by Karl Hartl and starred Brigette Helm. In 1948, Frederick de Cordova remade the film for Universal-International, starring Sonja Henie.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Jan 1934
p. 2
Motion Picture Daily
2 Apr 1934
p. 12
Motion Picture Herald
17 Feb 1934
p. 31
Motion Picture Herald
3 Mar 1934
p. 38
New York Times
2 Apr 1934
p. 13
Variety
3 Apr 1934
p. 17
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Stanley Bergerman Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Phil Karlstein
Asst dir
Asst dir
WRITERS
Contr wrt
Earl Snell
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Supv film ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Myrtle Gibson
Scr clerk
Supv secy
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the German film Die Graefin von Monte Cristo , written by Walter Reisch (Ufa, 1932).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"No One Worries, No One Cares," composer undetermined.
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 March 1934
Production Date:
12420
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures Corp.
15 March 1934
LP4558
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78 or 80
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Janet Krueger is an extra at a Viennese film studio. She is in love with Stefan, a reporter, but neither makes enough money to support a marriage. She obtains a small part in a film, playing a wealthy Countess traveling in a fashionable car. After the temperamental director criticizes her acting, she drives the automobile off the lot instead of stopping at the studio-built hotel front. She is accompanied by her friend Mimi, who is playing her maid. When they arrive at a luxurious resort, still dressed in their costumes, the two women continue to play their roles, not knowing what else to do. Because a label on her luggage identifies her as the Countess of Monte Cristo, Janet is given a splendid suite. That evening when the police knock on her door, Janet assumes that they have come to arrest her. In fact, they have come to warn her that a thief has broken into her rooms. Finding Janet's closets empty, they assume that the thief has stolen her clothes and the manager offers to replace everything. After they leave, a man called the Baron, who has been hiding in her room, tells Janet that he is the man the police were looking for. Recognizing Janet as another confidence artist, the Baron writes a list of everything he would have stolen if she had owned it. Although Janet is frightened by the ruse, she is delighted with the clothes and jewels when they arrive. Elegantly dressed for dinner, Janet is approached by Rumowski, a mysterious man, who invites her to celebrate New Year's Eve with him. Meanwhile, ...

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Janet Krueger is an extra at a Viennese film studio. She is in love with Stefan, a reporter, but neither makes enough money to support a marriage. She obtains a small part in a film, playing a wealthy Countess traveling in a fashionable car. After the temperamental director criticizes her acting, she drives the automobile off the lot instead of stopping at the studio-built hotel front. She is accompanied by her friend Mimi, who is playing her maid. When they arrive at a luxurious resort, still dressed in their costumes, the two women continue to play their roles, not knowing what else to do. Because a label on her luggage identifies her as the Countess of Monte Cristo, Janet is given a splendid suite. That evening when the police knock on her door, Janet assumes that they have come to arrest her. In fact, they have come to warn her that a thief has broken into her rooms. Finding Janet's closets empty, they assume that the thief has stolen her clothes and the manager offers to replace everything. After they leave, a man called the Baron, who has been hiding in her room, tells Janet that he is the man the police were looking for. Recognizing Janet as another confidence artist, the Baron writes a list of everything he would have stolen if she had owned it. Although Janet is frightened by the ruse, she is delighted with the clothes and jewels when they arrive. Elegantly dressed for dinner, Janet is approached by Rumowski, a mysterious man, who invites her to celebrate New Year's Eve with him. Meanwhile, the Baron proposes that he and Janet set up a racket together and when she refuses, threatens to expose her real identity to the management. Rumowski comes to Janet's aid, unaware that the police have identified him as a famous thief and are surrounding the hotel. When Rumowski notices what is happening, he gallantly offers to distract the police while Janet and Mimi escape. Nonetheless, Janet is arrested along the road. She calls Stefan for help, and after she tells him about Rumowski's capture. Stefan writes a story about Rumowski and Janet's adventures and sells it for a lot of money. The escapade convinces the studio of Janet's acting abilities and they offer her a contract thereby enabling Janet and Stefan to get married.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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