Shakedown (1936)

54-57 mins | Drama | 17 July 1936

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Night Wire . The Var review notes that Joan Perry made her debut in a lead role in this film, after having been a photographer's model in New ... More Less

The working title of this film was Night Wire . The Var review notes that Joan Perry made her debut in a lead role in this film, after having been a photographer's model in New York. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
6 Aug 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
18 Aug 36
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Aug 36
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
18 Aug 36
p. 15.
Motion Picture Herald
12 Sep 36
p. 48.
New York Times
17 Aug 36
p. 9.
Variety
19 Aug 36
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Harry Cohn, President
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Contr to dial
Contr to dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Night Wire
Release Date:
17 July 1936
Production Date:
11 May--27 May 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp. of California, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
13 July 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6468
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
54-57
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2264
SYNOPSIS

Bob Sanderson, an unemployed engineer, is in love with Edith Stuart, daughter of G. Gregory Stuart, the boss of the Great Western Telegraph Co. Edith persuades Bob to overcome his reluctance to ask her father for a job, and he accepts the position of messenger boy, which pays twenty dollars per week. After a month of hard work, Stuart calls Bob in and offers him a job as commercial contact. Sensing it is simply to ensure that Edith has support, Bob rejects the offer, and although angered, Stuart respects Bob for his decision. Meanwhile, Stuart's secretary, Ralph Gurney, is pressured by gangsters Hawsley and Spud to pay off his $5,000 gambling debt. Stuart rejects Ralph's request for an advance, since he disapproves of his gambling habit. Ralph comes up with a plan to help himself and Edith as well. He suggests to Edith that they fake her own kidnapping in order to cause Stuart to recognize Bob's worth and provide him with the money. However, when Edith is kidnapped by Hawsley and Spud she becomes afraid, grabs Hawsley's gun and shoots him. Unaware of the ruse, Bob arrives at the club according to Ralph and Edith's plan. He sees a car leave and finds Hawsley's body, but when the police arrive, the corpse has disappeared, and the caretaker claims that Bob imagined it all. The next day, Edith confesses her predicament to her father, who consults Ralph. Bob meanwhile realizes the entire incident was a hoax: In having his apparently blood-soaked clothes cleaned, he learned it was only red ink. When Bob, Edith, the police and newspaper reporter ... +


Bob Sanderson, an unemployed engineer, is in love with Edith Stuart, daughter of G. Gregory Stuart, the boss of the Great Western Telegraph Co. Edith persuades Bob to overcome his reluctance to ask her father for a job, and he accepts the position of messenger boy, which pays twenty dollars per week. After a month of hard work, Stuart calls Bob in and offers him a job as commercial contact. Sensing it is simply to ensure that Edith has support, Bob rejects the offer, and although angered, Stuart respects Bob for his decision. Meanwhile, Stuart's secretary, Ralph Gurney, is pressured by gangsters Hawsley and Spud to pay off his $5,000 gambling debt. Stuart rejects Ralph's request for an advance, since he disapproves of his gambling habit. Ralph comes up with a plan to help himself and Edith as well. He suggests to Edith that they fake her own kidnapping in order to cause Stuart to recognize Bob's worth and provide him with the money. However, when Edith is kidnapped by Hawsley and Spud she becomes afraid, grabs Hawsley's gun and shoots him. Unaware of the ruse, Bob arrives at the club according to Ralph and Edith's plan. He sees a car leave and finds Hawsley's body, but when the police arrive, the corpse has disappeared, and the caretaker claims that Bob imagined it all. The next day, Edith confesses her predicament to her father, who consults Ralph. Bob meanwhile realizes the entire incident was a hoax: In having his apparently blood-soaked clothes cleaned, he learned it was only red ink. When Bob, Edith, the police and newspaper reporter Presto Mullins arrive at the club, a search reveals Hawsley's corpse in the dumbwaiter. Stuart is about to pay off Ralph and Spud, who want $50,000 for their silence, when Bob calls to tell him the news. Bob and the police rush to the Stuart home and arrive in time to hear Ralph confess to Hawsley's murder. A chase to the airport ensues, in which Bob jumps on the wing of the waiting aircraft to prevent Ralph's escape. Afterwards Stuart consents to the couple's marriage and gives Bob the position he wants and a $4,000 salary that will force his spoiled daughter to change her expensive taste. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.