We've Never Been Licked (1943)

101 or 103-104 mins | Drama | 30 July 1943

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Texas Aggies . The opening credits include the following written statement: "With appreciation to the staff and student body of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas whose cooperation made this picture possible." The opening credits also state that the final battle sequence was "made with the cooperation of the Navy Department." The film then opens with the following written dedication: "This motion picture is dedicated to the thousands of Texas A. & M. college students who participated in the making of this picture and who are now serving their country on many battlefronts all over the world."
       The Var review for this film mistakenly states that Anne Gwynne's character "Nina Lambert" is the daughter of "'Pop' Lambert," played by Samuel S. Hinds, though she is clearly referred to numerous times in the film as his granddaughter. HR news items report that large portions of the film were shot on location in College Station, TX, the home of Texas A & M. According to HR , actor Richard Quine replaced Robert Cummings in the role of "Brad Craig" because Cummings' duties with the Civil Air Patrol did not allow him to leave the Southern California area for the required location shooting in Texas. HR news items state that Rex Bell and James Brown were considered for roles in We've Never Been Licked , but neither actor appeared in the film. HR also reported that Texas governor Coke Stevenson and Texas A & M president T. O. Walton, as well as actor Dick Foran, were cast in ... More Less

The working title of this film was Texas Aggies . The opening credits include the following written statement: "With appreciation to the staff and student body of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas whose cooperation made this picture possible." The opening credits also state that the final battle sequence was "made with the cooperation of the Navy Department." The film then opens with the following written dedication: "This motion picture is dedicated to the thousands of Texas A. & M. college students who participated in the making of this picture and who are now serving their country on many battlefronts all over the world."
       The Var review for this film mistakenly states that Anne Gwynne's character "Nina Lambert" is the daughter of "'Pop' Lambert," played by Samuel S. Hinds, though she is clearly referred to numerous times in the film as his granddaughter. HR news items report that large portions of the film were shot on location in College Station, TX, the home of Texas A & M. According to HR , actor Richard Quine replaced Robert Cummings in the role of "Brad Craig" because Cummings' duties with the Civil Air Patrol did not allow him to leave the Southern California area for the required location shooting in Texas. HR news items state that Rex Bell and James Brown were considered for roles in We've Never Been Licked , but neither actor appeared in the film. HR also reported that Texas governor Coke Stevenson and Texas A & M president T. O. Walton, as well as actor Dick Foran, were cast in the film, but their appearances in the released film have not been confirmed.
       Upon the conclusion of filming We've Never Been Licked , Universal and began a contract dispute with actress Martha O'Driscoll. According to HR , O'Driscoll was signed in Feb 1943 to a Universal contract based on her performance in this film. In Mar 1943, however, O'Driscoll began proceedings to void her contract with the studio, arguing that her mother had signed the contract before she turned twenty-one years of age, and thus, the contract was void under California state law because the proper legal procedures for such a contract had not been followed. In early Apr 1943, HR news items stated that O'Driscoll's contract with Universal had been ruled invalid. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
7 Aug 1943.
---
Daily Variety
30 Jul 43
p. 3, 10
Film Daily
2 Aug 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 1942.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 42
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Oct 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Oct 42
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Nov 42
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Nov 42
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Nov 42
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Dec 42
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Dec 42
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jan 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 43
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Feb 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 43
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 43
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 43
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jul 43
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Aug 43
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Jan 43
p. 1115.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
7 Aug 43
p. 1469.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Nov 43
p. 1617.
New York Times
19 Aug 43
p. 23.
Variety
4 Aug 43
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Dial dir
Flying scenes dir by
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
[Flying scenes] photog by
[Flying scenes] photog by
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
Vocal arr
Mus score
SOUND
Dir of sd
[Sd] tech
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Military tech adv
Tech adv [final battle seq]
SOURCES
MUSIC
"The Marine's Hymn," music based on a theme from the opera Geneviève de Brabant by Jacques Offenbach.
SONGS
"Me for You, Forever," music and lyrics by Harry Revel and Paul Francis Webster
"Silent Night, Holy Night," music by Franz Gruber, lyrics by Joseph Mohr, English lyrics, anonymous
"Spirit of Aggieland," music by Richard J. Dunn, lyrics by Marvin H. Mimms
+
SONGS
"Me for You, Forever," music and lyrics by Harry Revel and Paul Francis Webster
"Silent Night, Holy Night," music by Franz Gruber, lyrics by Joseph Mohr, English lyrics, anonymous
"Spirit of Aggieland," music by Richard J. Dunn, lyrics by Marvin H. Mimms
"The Twelfth Man," music and lyrics by Lil Munnerlyn
"I'd Rather Be a Texas Aggie," music and lyrics by Jack H. Littlejohn
"The Aggie War Hymn," music and lyrics by J. V. "Pinky" Wilson.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Texas Aggies
Release Date:
30 July 1943
Production Date:
mid November 1942--early February 1943
addl scenes 30 March--31 March 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
18 August 1943
Copyright Number:
LP12198
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
101 or 103-104
Length(in feet):
9,310
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9326
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The "Army Hour" radio program honors the new graduates of Texas A & M who are preparing to join the United States Armed Forces. Many of the school's alumni, such as Colonel Jason "Cannonball" Craig, listen to the broadcast from their stations in the South Pacific. Radio announcer Bill Stern then tells the story of Brad Craig, Jason's son, who first attended Texas A & M in 1938: On the train to the college, Brad meets and falls for Nina Lambert, the granddaughter of chemistry professor "Pop" Lambert. Brad has a hard time adjusting to the rigors and traditions of the military school, despite the constant counsel of his roommate, Cyanide Jenkins. Bill tells Pop that he plans to quit college and return to his home in the Philippines, but the professor convinces him to stay. Later, at a late-night pep rally, Bill meets and quickly becomes friends with two Japanese students, Matsui and Kubo. Brad and Nina date for his first two years at the college, though she and Cyanide soon fall in love. The two finally admit their true feelings to each other at a ball, but, out of loyalty to Brad, they remain only friends. As the United States prepares for war in the South Pacific, Brad receives the ire of his fellow cadets for his continuous support of the Japanese. Brad's mind is changed, however, when he sees photographs of the atrocities committed by the Japanese in China. At the beginning of his senior year, Brad is accused of helping Matsui and Kubo steal a secret formula from Pop's laboratory, though he is only ... +


The "Army Hour" radio program honors the new graduates of Texas A & M who are preparing to join the United States Armed Forces. Many of the school's alumni, such as Colonel Jason "Cannonball" Craig, listen to the broadcast from their stations in the South Pacific. Radio announcer Bill Stern then tells the story of Brad Craig, Jason's son, who first attended Texas A & M in 1938: On the train to the college, Brad meets and falls for Nina Lambert, the granddaughter of chemistry professor "Pop" Lambert. Brad has a hard time adjusting to the rigors and traditions of the military school, despite the constant counsel of his roommate, Cyanide Jenkins. Bill tells Pop that he plans to quit college and return to his home in the Philippines, but the professor convinces him to stay. Later, at a late-night pep rally, Bill meets and quickly becomes friends with two Japanese students, Matsui and Kubo. Brad and Nina date for his first two years at the college, though she and Cyanide soon fall in love. The two finally admit their true feelings to each other at a ball, but, out of loyalty to Brad, they remain only friends. As the United States prepares for war in the South Pacific, Brad receives the ire of his fellow cadets for his continuous support of the Japanese. Brad's mind is changed, however, when he sees photographs of the atrocities committed by the Japanese in China. At the beginning of his senior year, Brad is accused of helping Matsui and Kubo steal a secret formula from Pop's laboratory, though he is only pretending to be a traitor and actually gives the Japanese spies a counterfeit formula. Brad is soon forsaken by his fellow cadets, then expelled from the college. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Brad goes to Japan, where he performs on anti-American radio broadcasts. Prior to the Japanese attack on the Solomon Islands, Brad is taken aboard a Japanese aircraft carrier, then is assigned an airplane so that he can report on the battle from the sky. Seeing his window of opportunity, Brad kills his Japanese pilot, then radios the American flyers, who include Cyanide, of the position of the Japanese fleet. The Americans win the sea battle with further help from Brad, who commits suicide by crashing his plane onto the deck of a Japanese carrier. As the "Army Hour" radio broadcast ends, Brad is posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his self-sacrifice, and his father listens with pride to the ceremony. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.