Such Women Are Dangerous (1934)

81 mins | Drama | 4 May 1934

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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Odd Thursday , which was the title of Vera Caspary's unpublished story, and Too Many Women . According to a DV news item, the Catholic Church put this film on their "condemned" ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Odd Thursday , which was the title of Vera Caspary's unpublished story, and Too Many Women . According to a DV news item, the Catholic Church put this film on their "condemned" list. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
12 Apr 34
p. 3.
Daily Variety
13 Aug 34
p. 6.
Film Daily
9 Jun 34
p. 5.
HF
10 Feb 34
p. 8.
HF
17 Mar 34
p. 12.
International Photographer
1 Mar 34
p. 16.
Motion Picture Daily
13 Apr 34
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
31 Mar 34
p. 69.
Motion Picture Herald
16 Jun 34
p. 82.
New York Times
9 Jun 34
p. 18.
Variety
12 Jun 34
p. 63.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITERS
Story
Addl dial
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam op
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec asst
PRODUCTION MISC
Chief elec
Chief grip
Props
Bus mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"Vocal Studies," words and music by Frank Tresselt
"Be Sweet to Me Cherie," words and music by Louis De Francesco.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Too Many Women
Odd Thursday
Release Date:
4 May 1934
Production Date:
early February--mid March 1934
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
4 May 1934
Copyright Number:
LP4674
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
81
Length(in feet):
7,421
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Best-selling author Michael Shawn, whom his secretary, Helen Halleck, thinks should be writing more serious works, has a cyniccal contempt for the nine million women who buy his books. In the midst of dictating his latest novel, Michael is angered when an opera singer across the way interrupts his train of thought with her practicing; however, when he confronts the singer, Wanda Paris, they are attracted to each other, and they soon begin a romance. While autographing books at a department store, Michael is confronted by Verne Little, a young, impetuous fan who drove to New York from Indiana with the hope that Michael would help with her writing. Michael patiently listens as Verne reads her dreadfully morbid poetry and then arranges for Helen to lunch with Verne as he escapes to meet Wanda. After lunch, Verne, looking through Michael's apartment window, spies Michael and Wanda embracing in her apartment. Helen tries to comfort Verne, who is in tears because of her infatuation with Michael, but Verne accuses Helen of being in love with Michael herself. Helen then advises Michael that it would be dangerous for him to see Verne again because she dramatizes everything. He agrees, but Verne convinces him to take a drive with her to the country. They stop at a cottage for rent in Westchester and amuse themselves describing how they would fix it up. When the real estate agent arrives unexpectedly and sees Michael, in fun, carry Verne over the threshold into the bedroom, Michael, embarrassed, calls Verne his wife. After the agent leaves, Verne seductively climbs on Michael and kisses him, and when he berates ... +


Best-selling author Michael Shawn, whom his secretary, Helen Halleck, thinks should be writing more serious works, has a cyniccal contempt for the nine million women who buy his books. In the midst of dictating his latest novel, Michael is angered when an opera singer across the way interrupts his train of thought with her practicing; however, when he confronts the singer, Wanda Paris, they are attracted to each other, and they soon begin a romance. While autographing books at a department store, Michael is confronted by Verne Little, a young, impetuous fan who drove to New York from Indiana with the hope that Michael would help with her writing. Michael patiently listens as Verne reads her dreadfully morbid poetry and then arranges for Helen to lunch with Verne as he escapes to meet Wanda. After lunch, Verne, looking through Michael's apartment window, spies Michael and Wanda embracing in her apartment. Helen tries to comfort Verne, who is in tears because of her infatuation with Michael, but Verne accuses Helen of being in love with Michael herself. Helen then advises Michael that it would be dangerous for him to see Verne again because she dramatizes everything. He agrees, but Verne convinces him to take a drive with her to the country. They stop at a cottage for rent in Westchester and amuse themselves describing how they would fix it up. When the real estate agent arrives unexpectedly and sees Michael, in fun, carry Verne over the threshold into the bedroom, Michael, embarrassed, calls Verne his wife. After the agent leaves, Verne seductively climbs on Michael and kisses him, and when he berates her, she pleads that she'll never do it again if he will continue to let her see him. After Verne meets Wanda in Michael's apartment, Verne writes him that she will do something dangerous if he doesn't give Wanda up. He angrily writes back that his patience is wearing thin with her and asks her to come that evening to settle the situation. As Verne leaves her hotel to see Michael, the clerk says that if she does not pay her bill when she returns, he will be obliged to lock her room. Michael castigates her for attempting to interfere with his personal life and asks her to go back home and forget him. When he gives her a check to pay for her trip, she says it makes everything between them seem sordid. Michael confesses that he now plans to visit Wanda, and Verne drives off in tears. At Wanda's apartment, Michael finds her husband Jan, whom she had earlier told Michael was her "manager," and their son. Wanda tells Jan that Michael is writing a play for her, and Michael leaves without revealing their love affair. Meanwhile, Verne writes Michael another threatening letter in which she demands that he come to their "make-believe" house by twelve that night and delivers the note to Wanda's maid. Michael walks the streets and then goes into a movie theater. Three weeks later, Verne's body is found, and Michael is charged with her murder based on an abundance of circumstantial evidence. When Michael does not tell the court that he visited Wanda the night Verne died, Helen, believing that he spent the night with her and that he is trying not to involve her, implores Wanda to testify. Wanda introduces Helen to Jan, who states that Michael was only with them a short time. Helen starts to leave in resignation when Wanda's maid gives her a note for Michael. She and Michael think tha it is just another letter from an adoring fan, but after he tears it, he notices that it is the note Verne wrote in which she threatened to kill herself. Michael is found not guilty, and he soon marries Helen, who is happy that he has begun now to dictate serious prose. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.