My Dear Miss Aldrich (1937)

73 mins | Comedy | 17 September 1937

Director:

George B. Seitz

Cinematographer:

Charles "Bud" Lawton

Editor:

William S. Gray

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

A HR production chart on 19 Jul 1937 incorrectly identified actor Walter Pidgeon as Arthur Pidgeon. According to a news item in HR, Pidgeon was borrowed from Universal for the picture, but subsequent to its completion, he was put under contract to M-G-M. ...

More Less

A HR production chart on 19 Jul 1937 incorrectly identified actor Walter Pidgeon as Arthur Pidgeon. According to a news item in HR, Pidgeon was borrowed from Universal for the picture, but subsequent to its completion, he was put under contract to M-G-M.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16-Sep-37
---
Daily Variety
3 Sep 1937
p. 3
Film Daily
13 Oct 1937
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 1937
p. 19
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 1937
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 1937
p. 2
Motion Picture Daily
8 Sep 1937
p. 2
Motion Picture Herald
11 Sep 1937
p. 47
Variety
6 Oct 1937
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
WRITER
Orig story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Charles Lawton Jr.
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 September 1937
Production Date:
19 Jul--7 Aug 1937
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
14 September 1937
LP7633
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
73
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3621
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When Thomas Hobson, publisher of the New York Globe-Leader , dies without leaving a will, the paper reverts to his niece, Martha Aldrich, a schoolteacher from Nebraska. Ken Morley, the woman-hating managing editor of the Globe-Leader , is not looking forward to a woman boss, especially as he is busy working on a big story about the possible pregnancy of a visiting European queen. Impressed to find that Martha is an attractive young woman, Ken accompanies Martha and her aunt, Mrs. Lou Atherton, to spend the weekend at ex-Governor Warfield's home. While Aunt Lou works on newspaper puzzles, Martha works on Ken, trying to convince him to reverse his policy against hiring women. A few days later, when she boldly calls the queen to ask if the rumors are true, she confirms the pregnancy and lands an interview as well. When Martha officially takes ownership of the paper, Ken has "the boys" dress up themselves and the city room to make fun of her, but she ignores the swipe and asks for a job as a reporter. Despite his views on women reporters, Ken agrees, partially because he has fallen in love with her. Later, when Warfield's daughter Ellen asks Martha to be a witness at her secret marriage to Chronicle editor Gregory Stone, and the scoop is only printed in the Chronicle , Ken angrily fires her. Consoling herself by buying a hat, Martha sees Mrs. Sinclair, who with her husband is an important labor leader about to initiate a strike against industrialist Talbot, and gets a hunch about a secret settlement. She goes to Mrs. Sinclair ...

More Less

When Thomas Hobson, publisher of the New York Globe-Leader , dies without leaving a will, the paper reverts to his niece, Martha Aldrich, a schoolteacher from Nebraska. Ken Morley, the woman-hating managing editor of the Globe-Leader , is not looking forward to a woman boss, especially as he is busy working on a big story about the possible pregnancy of a visiting European queen. Impressed to find that Martha is an attractive young woman, Ken accompanies Martha and her aunt, Mrs. Lou Atherton, to spend the weekend at ex-Governor Warfield's home. While Aunt Lou works on newspaper puzzles, Martha works on Ken, trying to convince him to reverse his policy against hiring women. A few days later, when she boldly calls the queen to ask if the rumors are true, she confirms the pregnancy and lands an interview as well. When Martha officially takes ownership of the paper, Ken has "the boys" dress up themselves and the city room to make fun of her, but she ignores the swipe and asks for a job as a reporter. Despite his views on women reporters, Ken agrees, partially because he has fallen in love with her. Later, when Warfield's daughter Ellen asks Martha to be a witness at her secret marriage to Chronicle editor Gregory Stone, and the scoop is only printed in the Chronicle , Ken angrily fires her. Consoling herself by buying a hat, Martha sees Mrs. Sinclair, who with her husband is an important labor leader about to initiate a strike against industrialist Talbot, and gets a hunch about a secret settlement. She goes to Mrs. Sinclair to get a story but, though Mrs. Sinclair is sympathetic to the plight of woman reporters, she tells Martha nothing. Later, Martha sees the Sinclairs sneak out of their apartment and follows them to the Red Apple Inn in Fort Lee, where they and Talbot are secretly ratifying a new labor contract. While Ellen tries to get her story by hiding in a dumb waiter, a worried Ken and Aunt Lou discover where she has gone and follow her with reporter Ted Martin. Angered when she realizes that Martha actually owns the Globe-Leader , Mrs. Sinclair ties her up and decides to give the story only to the Chronicle . When Ken, Ted and Aunt Lou break in, they, too, are tied up. After using the mirror from her compact to untie their bonds, Martha and Ken sneak out and plant the story while Aunt Lou pretends to have small pox and the restaurant is quarantined by some of Ken's reporters posing as ambulance attendants. Finally realizing that they work well together as a team, Ken proposes that she stay on as a reporter and as his wife, and she happily agrees to both propositions.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

The Symbol of the Unconquered

This black independent film was shot in Fort Lee, NJ, under the working title The Wilderness Trail. A 6 Nov 1920 Moving Picture World item ... >>

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Anita Loos's popular novella depicting the adventures of "Lorelei Lee" and "Dorothy Shaw" first appeared as a serial in Harper's Bazaar (Mar--Aug 1925) under the title ... >>

The Last of the Secret Agents?

The 29 Jun 1965 LAT announced the picture as the first to star the comedy duo of Marty Allen and Steve Rossi. It also marked the ... >>

Duel in the Sun

Niven Busch's novel was purchased by RKO in 1944. According to a 16 Nov 1944 HR news item, the studio intended to star John Wayne and ... >>

Mystery in Mexico

HR news items add the following information about the production: In Jan 1947, RKO announced that the film was to be a "bi-lingual" release, produced by J. ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.