Redheads on Parade (1935)

77-78 mins | Musical comedy | 30 August 1935

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HISTORY

The plot summary for this film was based on a screen continuity contained in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, and the onscreen credits were taken from a screen billing sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, both of which are located at the UCLA Theater Arts Library. According to a FD news item, producer Jesse L. Lasky, who used to have a vaudeville act called "Lasky's Redheads," began planning the film in late 1933. The Produced Scripts Collection includes early versions of the screenplay in which proposed cast members included Ginger Rogers as the heroine, Alice Faye as a platinum blonde, and Gregory Ratoff as Kunkel. The legal records note that Grant Mitchell was originally signed to play "Augustus Twill," and he was included on early HR production charts. HR news items and production charts note that first Nancy Carroll, and then June Knight, were cast as the heroine of the film, and that Jane Withers was to play "Patsy." Although NYT reported that the part of "Patsy" was written especially for her, Withers was replaced by four-year-old Patsy O'Connor when she had to start work in The Farmer Takes a Wife (see entry). Other HR news items stated that dance director Larry Ceballos and Tito Guizar were to be included in the cast, but their participation as actors in the completed film has not been confirmed. HR also reported that director Norman McLeod was on loan from Paramount, and that Bing Crosby, who was married to actress Dixie Lee, was going to sing selections of the ...

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The plot summary for this film was based on a screen continuity contained in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection, and the onscreen credits were taken from a screen billing sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, both of which are located at the UCLA Theater Arts Library. According to a FD news item, producer Jesse L. Lasky, who used to have a vaudeville act called "Lasky's Redheads," began planning the film in late 1933. The Produced Scripts Collection includes early versions of the screenplay in which proposed cast members included Ginger Rogers as the heroine, Alice Faye as a platinum blonde, and Gregory Ratoff as Kunkel. The legal records note that Grant Mitchell was originally signed to play "Augustus Twill," and he was included on early HR production charts. HR news items and production charts note that first Nancy Carroll, and then June Knight, were cast as the heroine of the film, and that Jane Withers was to play "Patsy." Although NYT reported that the part of "Patsy" was written especially for her, Withers was replaced by four-year-old Patsy O'Connor when she had to start work in The Farmer Takes a Wife (see entry). Other HR news items stated that dance director Larry Ceballos and Tito Guizar were to be included in the cast, but their participation as actors in the completed film has not been confirmed. HR also reported that director Norman McLeod was on loan from Paramount, and that Bing Crosby, who was married to actress Dixie Lee, was going to sing selections of the picture's songs on his radio show. According to the legal records, the majority of actresses playing redheads signed contracts stating that they would dye their hair the required shade of red.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21-Sep-35
---
Daily Variety
16 Jul 1935
p. 3
Film Daily
23 Nov 1933
p. 4
Film Daily
20 Mar 1935
p. 8
Film Daily
7 Sep 1935
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 1934
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 1934
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
13 Feb 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
15 Feb 1935
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 1935
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 1935
p. 14
Hollywood Reporter
11 Mar 1935
p. 14
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 1935
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
2 Apr 1935
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
4 Apr 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 1935
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 1935
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 1935
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
22 Apr 1935
p. 2
Motion Picture Daily
1 Jul 1935
p. 7
Motion Picture Herald
11 May 1935
p. 60
Motion Picture Herald
27 Jul 1935
p. 49
New York Times
3-Feb-35
---
Variety
4 Sep 1935
p. 31
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Lynn Barrie
Dave Thursby
Rebecca Wassem
Elouise Rozelle
James Notarro
Bob Linden
Ed Gordon
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Norman McLeod
Dir
WRITERS
Story
Story
William Le Baron
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
Contr to trmt
Joseph Mankiewicz
Contr to trmt
Edmund Hartmann
Contr to trmt
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
John Seitz
Photog
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
DANCE
Ensembles dir by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Redheads on Parade," music by Jay Gorney, lyrics by Herbert Stahlberg and Don Hartman; "I Found a Dream" and "I've Got Your Future All Planned," music by Jay Gorney, lyrics by Don Hartman.
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 August 1935
Production Date:
28 Feb--20 Apr 1935
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
30 August 1935
LP5801
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
77-78
Length(in feet):
7,010
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
932
SYNOPSIS

Movie producer George Magnus, actor John Bruce and their publicity agent, Peter Mathews, are attempting to make a comeback with their new picture, Beauties on Parade , but halfway through filming, their backer goes bankrupt. On their way to lunch, the dejected trio stops to use the phone at a beauty parlor owned by Ginger Blair, a former actress down on her luck. Ginger's misfortunes have been caused by Jean Harlow, who inspired the platinum-blonde hair craze that eradicated interest in Titianola, a red hair dye invented by Ginger and marketed by cosmetics magnate Augustus Twill. John hits on the idea of getting Twill to back the film by changing the title to Redheads on Parade and using it to advertise Titianola. Pete and Ginger sell Twill on the idea, telling him that George's studio will sponsor a nationwide beauty contest for redheads, with each state's winner appearing in the film. Twill puts up the money, but it quickly becomes clear that his interest is in Ginger, whom he wants to star in the film, rather than in movie making. He grows jealous over John and Ginger's love scenes and withdraws his support. Just after Twill leaves George's office, Lionel Kunkel and Trelawney Redfern, the manufacturers of Platinola, arrive and try to persuade George to change the film to Platinum Blondes on Parade , but Pete uses them to manipulate Twill into signing back on. Pete also convinces Ginger to play up to Twill so that he will keep the money flowing. Ginger is reluctant to ...

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Movie producer George Magnus, actor John Bruce and their publicity agent, Peter Mathews, are attempting to make a comeback with their new picture, Beauties on Parade , but halfway through filming, their backer goes bankrupt. On their way to lunch, the dejected trio stops to use the phone at a beauty parlor owned by Ginger Blair, a former actress down on her luck. Ginger's misfortunes have been caused by Jean Harlow, who inspired the platinum-blonde hair craze that eradicated interest in Titianola, a red hair dye invented by Ginger and marketed by cosmetics magnate Augustus Twill. John hits on the idea of getting Twill to back the film by changing the title to Redheads on Parade and using it to advertise Titianola. Pete and Ginger sell Twill on the idea, telling him that George's studio will sponsor a nationwide beauty contest for redheads, with each state's winner appearing in the film. Twill puts up the money, but it quickly becomes clear that his interest is in Ginger, whom he wants to star in the film, rather than in movie making. He grows jealous over John and Ginger's love scenes and withdraws his support. Just after Twill leaves George's office, Lionel Kunkel and Trelawney Redfern, the manufacturers of Platinola, arrive and try to persuade George to change the film to Platinum Blondes on Parade , but Pete uses them to manipulate Twill into signing back on. Pete also convinces Ginger to play up to Twill so that he will keep the money flowing. Ginger is reluctant to do so because of her growing relationship with John, but manages to juggle dates with both of them until just before the film is finished. Kunkel and Redfern warn Twill that Ginger is seeing John and try to photograph the couple to prove it. After Ginger and John see the pair sneaking around, she inadvertently admits that she has been dating Twill, and the two quarrel. Later, on the day of the premiere, Kunkel tries to find the film of Ginger with John to show Twill, while Redfern successfully bribes Joe, a cutter on George's lot, to disappear with the only print of Redheads on Parade . As Kunkel develops the photographs, Redfern rushes in to tell him of his triumph. The photos are ruined, but the accidental combination of Platinola and developing fluid turn Kunkel's hair a beautiful shade of red. Deciding that they can make a fortune from their new formula if the movie does open, Kunkel and Redfern dash off to find Joe. Meanwhile, Pete tries to calm Twill, who has just been dumped by Ginger, and later, at the theater, Pete tells John that it was his idea for Ginger to string Twill along. George panics as the audience grows impatient for the film to begin, and John looks for Ginger, who has overheard Joe bragging about the easy money he has made. She finds the film in his car and rushes it to the theater just in time. She then goes home, where she is soon joined by John, who apologizes, and the lovers reunite as the audience in the theater goes wild over their film.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.