Way Out West (1937)

64 mins | Comedy | 16 April 1937

Director:

James W. Horne

Cinematographers:

Walter Lundin, Art Lloyd

Editor:

Bert Jordan

Production Designer:

Arthur I. Royce

Production Companies:

Hal Roach Studios, Inc., Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were They Done It Wrong and Tonight's the Night, and a 14 Sep 1936 ad in HR refers to Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy's upcoming feature as In the Money. Modern sources state that You'd Be Surprised was another working title. According to a HR news item, director James Horne worked on the film's script. Although Stanley "Tiny" Sandford is listed by HR production charts as being in the cast, modern sources note that he was replaced in the role of the sheriff by Stanley Fields. M-G-M publicity sheets for the picture state that the river into which "Ollie" falls was man-made just above Sherwood Lake, about forty miles from Los Angeles. The film's music score, written by Marvin Hatley, received an Academy Award nomination for Best Music Scoring. According to a 11 Aug 1939 HR news item, producer Hal Roach, M-G-M and Loews, Inc. were sued by Isabella Knotter, who claimed that Way Out West and Swiss Miss (see entry), were plagiarized from her book So zwei pechvogel. The outcome of the case has not been determined. Modern sources provide the following information about the production: Chill Wills, who was a member of The Avalon Boys, supplied the bass voice-over for Laurel during the "Trail of the Lonesome Pine" number, while actress Rosina Lawrence provided the soprano voice. The role of Mary Roberts was originally slated for Jacqueline Wells . Arthur Vernon Jones worked on the script, and Jack Dawn did the makeup. Modern ...

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The working titles of this film were They Done It Wrong and Tonight's the Night, and a 14 Sep 1936 ad in HR refers to Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy's upcoming feature as In the Money. Modern sources state that You'd Be Surprised was another working title. According to a HR news item, director James Horne worked on the film's script. Although Stanley "Tiny" Sandford is listed by HR production charts as being in the cast, modern sources note that he was replaced in the role of the sheriff by Stanley Fields. M-G-M publicity sheets for the picture state that the river into which "Ollie" falls was man-made just above Sherwood Lake, about forty miles from Los Angeles. The film's music score, written by Marvin Hatley, received an Academy Award nomination for Best Music Scoring. According to a 11 Aug 1939 HR news item, producer Hal Roach, M-G-M and Loews, Inc. were sued by Isabella Knotter, who claimed that Way Out West and Swiss Miss (see entry), were plagiarized from her book So zwei pechvogel. The outcome of the case has not been determined. Modern sources provide the following information about the production: Chill Wills, who was a member of The Avalon Boys, supplied the bass voice-over for Laurel during the "Trail of the Lonesome Pine" number, while actress Rosina Lawrence provided the soprano voice. The role of Mary Roberts was originally slated for Jacqueline Wells . Arthur Vernon Jones worked on the script, and Jack Dawn did the makeup. Modern sources also add the following actors to the cast: James Mason (Anxious patron); Harry Bernard (Man eating at bar); May Wallace (Cook); Jack Hill (Saloon worker); Sam Lufkin (Baggage man); Fred Toones (Janitor); Bobby Dunn, John Ince, Fritzi Brunette, Frank Montgomery, Bill Wolfe, Denver Dixon, Fred Cady Eddie Borden, Helen Holmes, Ben Corbett and Buffalo Bill, Jr. (Members of raucous audience), Cy Slocum (Member of raucous audience/Oliver Hardy's double), Lester Dorr (Cowboy extra); and Ham Kinsey (Stan Laurel's double). During the Mar 1992 Academy Awards telecast, in a salute to the 100th birthday of Hal Roach, a clip from the "At the Ball, That's All" dance number was shown, and through special effects, comedian Billy Crystal was seen dancing with Laurel and Hardy. For additional information on Laurel and Hardy's career together, please See Entry for Pardon Us.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Dec 1936
p. 3
Film Daily
19 Dec 1936
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
21 Aug 1936
p. 12
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 1936
p. 19
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 1936
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 1936
p. 11
Hollywood Reporter
17 Sep 1936
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
18 Sep 1936
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
28 Sep 1936
p. 14
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 1936
p. 14
Hollywood Reporter
16 Dec 1936
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 1939
p. 7
Motion Picture Daily
17 Dec 1936
p. 2
Motion Picture Herald
2 Jan 1937
p. 65
New York Times
4 May 1937
p. 29
Variety
5 May 1937
p. 16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Stan Laurel Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Pres
S. S. Van Keuren
Supv
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
Contr wrt
Contr wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
W. L. Stevens
Settings
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Photog eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr clerk
SOURCES
SONGS
"Will You Be My Lovey-Dovey," words by Portia Lanning, music by Marvin Hatley; "At the Ball, That's All," words and music by J. Leubrie Hill; "The Trail of the Lonesome Pine," words by Ballard MacDonald, music by Harry Carroll; "I Want to Be in Dixie," words and music by Irving Berlin and Ted Schneider.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
In the Money
They Done It Wrong
Tonight's the Night
Release Date:
16 April 1937
Production Date:
31 Aug--early Nov 1936
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
9 April 1937
LP7051
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
64
Length(in feet):
5,791
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2653
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Stanley Laurel and Oliver Hardy are traveling to Brushwood Gulch, a small Western town, to deliver the deed of a valuable gold mine to Mary Roberts, the daughter of a deceased friend. They hitch a ride on a stagecoach, which also carries an attractive woman who catches Ollie's fancy. When they arrive, the woman complains to her husband, the sheriff, about Ollie's attentions, and he warns Ollie and Stan to be on the next stagecoach or else. After a little song and dance with some cowboys, the boys go to Mickey Finn's Palace for a drink, and Stan lets Finn in on their secret mission. Mary works for Finn as a kitchen drudge, but the boys have never met her, so Finn arranges for his wife, singer Lola Marcel, to impersonate Mary and steal the deed. Stan and Ollie give Lola the deed, as well as a locket belonging to Mary's father. As the boys are downstairs singing with the cowboys and having a drink for the road, Lola tricks the trusting Mary into signing the deed over to her. After the boys say their goodbyes, they accidentally meet Mary and discover their mistake. Stan and Ollie go back up to Lola's room to recover the deed, but after a long chase, Finn locks it in the safe. The sheriff then arrives and shoots at them as they run away. That night, they plan to steal the deed, and Ollie makes Stan eat his hat, as Stan did not fulfill his earlier promise to get the deed back after they first discovered the subterfuge. They sneak into town and, with the help of ...

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Stanley Laurel and Oliver Hardy are traveling to Brushwood Gulch, a small Western town, to deliver the deed of a valuable gold mine to Mary Roberts, the daughter of a deceased friend. They hitch a ride on a stagecoach, which also carries an attractive woman who catches Ollie's fancy. When they arrive, the woman complains to her husband, the sheriff, about Ollie's attentions, and he warns Ollie and Stan to be on the next stagecoach or else. After a little song and dance with some cowboys, the boys go to Mickey Finn's Palace for a drink, and Stan lets Finn in on their secret mission. Mary works for Finn as a kitchen drudge, but the boys have never met her, so Finn arranges for his wife, singer Lola Marcel, to impersonate Mary and steal the deed. Stan and Ollie give Lola the deed, as well as a locket belonging to Mary's father. As the boys are downstairs singing with the cowboys and having a drink for the road, Lola tricks the trusting Mary into signing the deed over to her. After the boys say their goodbyes, they accidentally meet Mary and discover their mistake. Stan and Ollie go back up to Lola's room to recover the deed, but after a long chase, Finn locks it in the safe. The sheriff then arrives and shoots at them as they run away. That night, they plan to steal the deed, and Ollie makes Stan eat his hat, as Stan did not fulfill his earlier promise to get the deed back after they first discovered the subterfuge. They sneak into town and, with the help of their mule "Dinah," loudly succeed in breaking into the saloon's kitchen, where Mary meets them. Their noise awakens Finn, who finds them hiding in the piano, but they manage to get his gun and make him retrieve the deed. After their escape, Stan, Ollie and Mary walk along the river, and Ollie and Mary discover that they are both from the South. Stan adds that he is from the south of London, and as the group sings about returning to Dixie, Ollie falls into a hole in the riverbed.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
with songs


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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