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HISTORY

This film was a Spanish-language version of the 1930 film Paramount on Parade (see entry). Contemporary sources indicate that the content and running order of the Spanish version was considerably different in the various countries in which it was exhibited. However, the summary above, which was derived from an advertisement that appeared during the film's run in Mexico City, appears to reflect the most complete version.
       Paramount made many foreign language versions of Paramount on Parade , but only the Spanish version appears to have been released in the U.S. The foreign versions all used most of the major musical sequences from the English original, but were introduced by onscreen hosts and hostesses speaking the language of the country in which the version was destined to be released. The hosts also performed in sequences that were substituted for most of the English sketches. At Paramount's Hollywood studio, Swedish singer Ernst Rolf and his Norwegian wife, Tutta Berntzen, filmed introductions and sequences for the Scandinavian version and Japanese comedian Suisei Matsui introduced and performed in the version released in his native land.
       The majority of the foreign versions were prepared at Paramount's Joinville studio in Paris. Saint-Granier, Marguerite Moreno, Boucot fils and Charles de Rochefort were featured in the French version. De Rochefort directed the additional sequences and also directed Dina Gralla and Eugen Rex in their scenes for the German version. Theo Frenkel, Jr., Mien Duymaer van Twist and Louis Davids appeared in the Dutch version while Mira Ziminska and Mariusz Maszynski hosted the Polish version. Versions were also shot at Joinville for the Czech, Hungarian, Rumanian, Serbian and Italian markets, but the identities of the ... More Less

This film was a Spanish-language version of the 1930 film Paramount on Parade (see entry). Contemporary sources indicate that the content and running order of the Spanish version was considerably different in the various countries in which it was exhibited. However, the summary above, which was derived from an advertisement that appeared during the film's run in Mexico City, appears to reflect the most complete version.
       Paramount made many foreign language versions of Paramount on Parade , but only the Spanish version appears to have been released in the U.S. The foreign versions all used most of the major musical sequences from the English original, but were introduced by onscreen hosts and hostesses speaking the language of the country in which the version was destined to be released. The hosts also performed in sequences that were substituted for most of the English sketches. At Paramount's Hollywood studio, Swedish singer Ernst Rolf and his Norwegian wife, Tutta Berntzen, filmed introductions and sequences for the Scandinavian version and Japanese comedian Suisei Matsui introduced and performed in the version released in his native land.
       The majority of the foreign versions were prepared at Paramount's Joinville studio in Paris. Saint-Granier, Marguerite Moreno, Boucot fils and Charles de Rochefort were featured in the French version. De Rochefort directed the additional sequences and also directed Dina Gralla and Eugen Rex in their scenes for the German version. Theo Frenkel, Jr., Mien Duymaer van Twist and Louis Davids appeared in the Dutch version while Mira Ziminska and Mariusz Maszynski hosted the Polish version. Versions were also shot at Joinville for the Czech, Hungarian, Rumanian, Serbian and Italian markets, but the identities of the respective hosts have not been determined. The sequence featuring "La Argentinita" for the Spanish version was shot in New York on 10 Apr 1930. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCERS
WRITER
Spanish version
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
SONGS
"Paramount on Parade," "Any Time's the Time To Fall in Love" and "I'm True to the Navy Now," words by Elsie Janis, music by Jack King
"Torna a Sorrento," words by G. B. de Curtis, music by Ernesto de Curtis
"Dancing To Save Your Sole" and "Let Us Drink to the Girl of My Dreams," words by L. Wolfe Gilbert, music by Abel Baer
+
SONGS
"Paramount on Parade," "Any Time's the Time To Fall in Love" and "I'm True to the Navy Now," words by Elsie Janis, music by Jack King
"Torna a Sorrento," words by G. B. de Curtis, music by Ernesto de Curtis
"Dancing To Save Your Sole" and "Let Us Drink to the Girl of My Dreams," words by L. Wolfe Gilbert, music by Abel Baer
"All I Want Is Just One Girl," words by Leo Robin, music by Richard A. Whiting
"I'm Isadore, the Toreador," words and music by David Franklin
"Nichavo!" words by Helen Jerome, music by Mana-Zucca
"Sweeping the Clouds Away," words and music by Sam Coslow.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Paramount on Parade
Release Date:
August 1930
Premiere Information:
Buenos Aires, Argentina opening: 28 August 1930
Los Angeles opening: 12 September 1930
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black & white with color sequences
Technicolor
Country:
United States
Language:
Spanish
SYNOPSIS

After the opening "Showgirls on Parade" dance number in Technicolor, masters of ceremonies Ramón Pereda, Rosita Moreno and Barry Norton introduce themselves. Charles (Buddy) Rogers and Lillian Roth sing "Any Time's the Time to Fall in Love," then Spanish actor Ernesto Vilches demonstrates his versatility in extracts from his characterizations as "Mr. Wu," "Don Juan" and others. Maurice Chevalier and Evelyn Brent investigate the origins of the Apache dance, after which Nino Martini serenades Rosita Moreno from a Venetian gondola in a Technicolor sequence. The Albertina Rasch dancers perform, then Nancy Carroll and Abe Lyman and his band interpret "Dancing To Save Your Sole." Harry Green and Kay Francis follow with "I'm Isadore, the Toreador" in Technicolor, and Juan Pulido sings popular songs in Spanish. Chevalier returns as a French gendarme, partroling in a park, and sings "All I Want Is Just One Girl," after which Ramón Pereda introduces Mitzi Green who impersonates Chevalier and Charlie Mack. Richard Arlen, Jean Arthur, Mary Brian, Gary Cooper, James Hall, Fay Wray, Phillips Holmes and Virginia Bruce are featured in the Technicolor production number "Let Us Drink to the Girl of My Dreams." "La Argentinita," accompanied by guitarist Luis Yance, performs Spanish songs and dances. Clara Bow, Jack Oakie, Skeets Gallaher and a chorus of sailors sing "I'm True to the Navy Now," then Dennis King sings "Nichavo!" directed, onscreen, by Ludwig Berger in Technicolor. After Rosita Moreno performs a fado, Chevalier and the dancers appear as Parisian chimney sweeps in the Technicolor finale, "Sweeping the Clouds ... +


After the opening "Showgirls on Parade" dance number in Technicolor, masters of ceremonies Ramón Pereda, Rosita Moreno and Barry Norton introduce themselves. Charles (Buddy) Rogers and Lillian Roth sing "Any Time's the Time to Fall in Love," then Spanish actor Ernesto Vilches demonstrates his versatility in extracts from his characterizations as "Mr. Wu," "Don Juan" and others. Maurice Chevalier and Evelyn Brent investigate the origins of the Apache dance, after which Nino Martini serenades Rosita Moreno from a Venetian gondola in a Technicolor sequence. The Albertina Rasch dancers perform, then Nancy Carroll and Abe Lyman and his band interpret "Dancing To Save Your Sole." Harry Green and Kay Francis follow with "I'm Isadore, the Toreador" in Technicolor, and Juan Pulido sings popular songs in Spanish. Chevalier returns as a French gendarme, partroling in a park, and sings "All I Want Is Just One Girl," after which Ramón Pereda introduces Mitzi Green who impersonates Chevalier and Charlie Mack. Richard Arlen, Jean Arthur, Mary Brian, Gary Cooper, James Hall, Fay Wray, Phillips Holmes and Virginia Bruce are featured in the Technicolor production number "Let Us Drink to the Girl of My Dreams." "La Argentinita," accompanied by guitarist Luis Yance, performs Spanish songs and dances. Clara Bow, Jack Oakie, Skeets Gallaher and a chorus of sailors sing "I'm True to the Navy Now," then Dennis King sings "Nichavo!" directed, onscreen, by Ludwig Berger in Technicolor. After Rosita Moreno performs a fado, Chevalier and the dancers appear as Parisian chimney sweeps in the Technicolor finale, "Sweeping the Clouds Away." +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.