Secrets (1933)

83 or 85 mins | Drama | 16 April 1933

Director:

Frank Borzage

Writer:

Frances Marion

Cinematographer:

Ray June

Editor:

Hugh Bennett

Production Designer:

Richard Day

Production Company:

The Pickford Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

May Edginton's story "Secrets" first appeared in Harper's Bazar [sic] in Dec 1918. This was legendary actress Mary Pickford's last film appearance. After retiring from the screen, she concentrated on her successful career as a businesswoman. According to the film's pressbook, "sling-shot champion" Charles Cline was responsible for breaking the dishes during the scene when the Houser gang attacks the Carltons, because real bullets could not be used. According to a HR news item, Buddy Rogers , whom Pickford married in 1937, "lobbied heavily" to play the male lead. HR also noted that plans to shoot on location in the Mojave Desert had to be abandoned because of adverse weather conditions. Rudolf Besier and May Edginton's play was first filmed in 1924 as a silent starring Norma Talmadge and directed by Frank Borzage (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.4888). According to modern sources, a remake of the 1924 film, produced by and starring Mary Pickford, co-starring Kenneth MacKenna and entitled Forever Yours, was begun in the spring of 1930, but was halted one third of the way through production because Pickford was dissatisfied with the results. The 1930 footage, which was directed by Marshall Neilan and scripted by Benjamin Glazer, was later destroyed. Pickford turned over the project to Frances Marion and Frank Borzage, who, in 1933, announced that Gary Cooper would be cast in the leading role. Modern sources also note that the working title of the 1933 film was Yes, John, and that it was budgeted at $450,000. Modern sources list silent film star ...

More Less

May Edginton's story "Secrets" first appeared in Harper's Bazar [sic] in Dec 1918. This was legendary actress Mary Pickford's last film appearance. After retiring from the screen, she concentrated on her successful career as a businesswoman. According to the film's pressbook, "sling-shot champion" Charles Cline was responsible for breaking the dishes during the scene when the Houser gang attacks the Carltons, because real bullets could not be used. According to a HR news item, Buddy Rogers , whom Pickford married in 1937, "lobbied heavily" to play the male lead. HR also noted that plans to shoot on location in the Mojave Desert had to be abandoned because of adverse weather conditions. Rudolf Besier and May Edginton's play was first filmed in 1924 as a silent starring Norma Talmadge and directed by Frank Borzage (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.4888). According to modern sources, a remake of the 1924 film, produced by and starring Mary Pickford, co-starring Kenneth MacKenna and entitled Forever Yours, was begun in the spring of 1930, but was halted one third of the way through production because Pickford was dissatisfied with the results. The 1930 footage, which was directed by Marshall Neilan and scripted by Benjamin Glazer, was later destroyed. Pickford turned over the project to Frances Marion and Frank Borzage, who, in 1933, announced that Gary Cooper would be cast in the leading role. Modern sources also note that the working title of the 1933 film was Yes, John, and that it was budgeted at $450,000. Modern sources list silent film star Elsie Janis as the film's technical and story advisor.

Less

PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
5 Dec 1932
p. 6
Film Daily
16 Mar 1933
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 1932
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
27 Oct 1932
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1932
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
26 Nov 1932
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
6 Dec 1932
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
28 Dec 1932
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
11 Feb 1933
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
18 Feb 1933
p. 27, 30
Motion Picture Herald
15 Apr 1933
pp. 23-26
New York Times
16 Mar 1933
p. 21
VarB
17-Feb-33
---
Variety
21 Mar 1933
p. 16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Frank Borzage Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Wrt for scr by
Addl dial
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Decorations
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Sd rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Transitions
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Slingshot expert
Still photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Secrets by Rudolf Besier and May Edginton (London, 7 Sep 1922).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
SONGS
"Oh, Susannah," music and lyrics by Stephen Foster.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 April 1933
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 15 Mar 1933
Production Date:
28 Nov 1932--Jan 1933
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
The Pickford Corp.
15 March 1933
LP3749
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
83 or 85
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

In the 1860's, New England shipping magnate William Marlowe tries to force his vivacious daughter Mary to marry stuffy Lord Hurley, but she becomes enamoured of John Carlton, one of Marlowe's clerks. Marlowe intercepts the couples' love notes and fires John, who later meets with Mary on the night of the party celebrating her engagement to Hurley. John tells Mary that he is moving West and will send for her, but she insists on coming with him, even though it will mean much hardship. The lovers are married that night and soon begin the torturous journey West with other pioneers. They arrive in the valley that is to be their new home, and as time passes, they build a small house and have a son, little John. One day, John and the Carltons' handyman, "Sunshine," go to town while Mary stays home. After the men leave, notorious cattle rustler Jake Houser, his brother Davey and their gang take over the house. A terrified Mary cooks for them when they threaten to kill the baby, and they leave with John's cattle. As John and Sunshine are on the trail homeward, they pass the Houser gang and recognize their own cattle. The pair are outnumbered and grimly return home, where Mary puts on a brave front. John believes that nothing can be done, but once he realizes that the gang threatened his family, he becomes angry and leaves to organize the other ranchers. John and Sunshine are gone for two days, during which time the ranchers lynch Davey and other gang members. John and Sunshine return home to discover ...

More Less

In the 1860's, New England shipping magnate William Marlowe tries to force his vivacious daughter Mary to marry stuffy Lord Hurley, but she becomes enamoured of John Carlton, one of Marlowe's clerks. Marlowe intercepts the couples' love notes and fires John, who later meets with Mary on the night of the party celebrating her engagement to Hurley. John tells Mary that he is moving West and will send for her, but she insists on coming with him, even though it will mean much hardship. The lovers are married that night and soon begin the torturous journey West with other pioneers. They arrive in the valley that is to be their new home, and as time passes, they build a small house and have a son, little John. One day, John and the Carltons' handyman, "Sunshine," go to town while Mary stays home. After the men leave, notorious cattle rustler Jake Houser, his brother Davey and their gang take over the house. A terrified Mary cooks for them when they threaten to kill the baby, and they leave with John's cattle. As John and Sunshine are on the trail homeward, they pass the Houser gang and recognize their own cattle. The pair are outnumbered and grimly return home, where Mary puts on a brave front. John believes that nothing can be done, but once he realizes that the gang threatened his family, he becomes angry and leaves to organize the other ranchers. John and Sunshine are gone for two days, during which time the ranchers lynch Davey and other gang members. John and Sunshine return home to discover that little John is ill, and that Jake is gunning for them. Jake and his gang swarm over the cabin, and during the attack, the baby dies from his fever. Mary shoots Jake as he is about to shoot John in the back, and the gang is defeated. John's part in ending the Houser gang's reign of terror makes him well-known, and as time passes he gains more political power. Years later, the Carlton family now includes children William, Audrey, Susan and Robert, and John is running for the post of governor of California. On the eve of the election, the Carltons throw a huge ball, and the family is shamed when John's mistress, Señora Lolita Martinez, makes an appearance. Lolita tells Mary that John wants his freedom so that he can marry her, but John denies this and declares that the affair is over. Lolita threatens to make their relationship public and storms out, after which a crushed but still-loving Mary forgives John this and other infidelities, of which she has known all along. Despite the scandal, John is elected governor, and after serving with distinction, he is elected to the U.S. Senate. Many years later, John, now the senior Californian senator, decides to step down so that Mary and he can leave Washington and return to California. Their now middle-aged children try to convince them to stay, but Mary tells them that each married couple has their own secrets, secret joys and sorrows, and that they now want to be alone with theirs. The old couple sneak away from their complaining children, and as they drive off, they reminisce about their fifty years of marriage.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Shaft

Although a Jun 1970 Publishers Weekly news item stated that M-G-M had already expressed interest in obtaining the rights to Ernest Tidyman’s novel for production by Stirling ... >>

Walk a Crooked Mile

The working title of this film was FBI Meets Scotland Yard . The film opens with an offscreen narrator explaining that "This picture is meant to acquaint the ... >>

Her Husband's Honor

The working title of this film was The Gadabout . One source credits Beatrice Allen with the role of Lila Davenport. Thomas Tommamato was formerly with ... >>

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

Memos included in the Warner Bros. Collection at the USC Cinema-Television Library add the following information about the production: The B. Traven novel was purchased by the studio in ... >>

Casablanca

In the onscreen credits, actor S. Z. Sakall's name is incorrectly spelled "S. K. Sakall." HR news items add the following information about the production: Warner ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.