Saturday's Children (1940)

97 or 101 mins | Drama | 11 May 1940

Director:

Vincent Sherman

Cinematographer:

James Wong Howe

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

Hugh Reticker

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The working title of this picture was Married, Pretty and Poor. According to several news items in HR, the picture suffered from casting difficulties. James Stewart was originally slated for the lead, but was replaced by John Garfield. Then Jane Bryant, who was to play "Bobby Havley," retired from acting to get married, and the role was reassigned to Olivia de Havilland, who was suspended when she refused to play the part. Marilyn Merrick was next in line to play "Bobby," but the studio felt that she was too inexperienced and so replaced her with Anne Shirley. The last casting change occurred when Lee Patrick replaced Una Merkel in the role of "Florrie Sands" when Merkel became ill. For information about other films based on Maxwell Anderson's play, See Entry for the 1935 First National picture Maybe It's Love. ...

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The working title of this picture was Married, Pretty and Poor. According to several news items in HR, the picture suffered from casting difficulties. James Stewart was originally slated for the lead, but was replaced by John Garfield. Then Jane Bryant, who was to play "Bobby Havley," retired from acting to get married, and the role was reassigned to Olivia de Havilland, who was suspended when she refused to play the part. Marilyn Merrick was next in line to play "Bobby," but the studio felt that she was too inexperienced and so replaced her with Anne Shirley. The last casting change occurred when Lee Patrick replaced Una Merkel in the role of "Florrie Sands" when Merkel became ill. For information about other films based on Maxwell Anderson's play, See Entry for the 1935 First National picture Maybe It's Love.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Apr 1940
p. 3
Film Daily
17 Apr 1940
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
8 Dec 1939
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
15 Dec 1939
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 1939
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
29 Dec 1939
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jan 1940
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
9 Apr 1940
p. 3
Motion Picture Daily
11 Apr 1940
p. 6
Motion Picture Herald
24 Feb 1940
p. 33
Motion Picture Herald
13 Apr 1940
p. 38
New York Times
4 May 1940
p. 13
Variety
10 Apr 1940
p. 14
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture; Jack L. Warner in charge of production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Publicist
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Saturday's Children by Maxwell Anderson (New York, 26 Jan 1927).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Married, Pretty and Poor
Release Date:
11 May 1940
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 4 May 1940
Production Date:
began early Dec 1939
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
11 May 1940
LP9629
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
97 or 101
Country:
United States
PCA No:
5984
SYNOPSIS

On her first day at work, Bobby Halevy meets eccentric inventor Rims Rosson, and the two begin dating. After several months of courtship, Bobby has fallen in love with Rims when he announces that he has been offered a good job turning hemp into silk in the Philippines and is leaving in two days. On the night of Rims's going-away party, Bobby's older sister, Florrie Sands, counsels her sister on how to trap Rims into marriage before he leaves. Florrie coaches Bobby to make Rims jealous by convincing him that she is going to marry someone else, and the trick works as Rims cancels his trip to marry Bobby. The marriage runs smoothly for several months until Bobby loses her job because of the war. The couple's mounting financial difficulties result in marital difficulties. Consequently, when Rims receives a letter from the Philippines, notifying him that the job is still open, Bobby, who has just learned she is pregnant, tears up the letter and conceals it and her pregnancy from Rims. The couple's finances take a turn for the worse when Rims receives a wage cut, forcing the newlyweds to consider moving into the senior Halevys already overcrowded apartment. This last financial blow is too great for Rims, who becomes embittered about losing his one chance at success in the Philippines. Feeling guilty, Bobby tells Rims about the letter offering him the position in Manila, and he lashes out at her with harsh recriminations. Fearful of telling Rims about her pregnancy, Bobby admits that she tricked him into marriage, and furious, he leaves for the Philippines. On the day that ...

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On her first day at work, Bobby Halevy meets eccentric inventor Rims Rosson, and the two begin dating. After several months of courtship, Bobby has fallen in love with Rims when he announces that he has been offered a good job turning hemp into silk in the Philippines and is leaving in two days. On the night of Rims's going-away party, Bobby's older sister, Florrie Sands, counsels her sister on how to trap Rims into marriage before he leaves. Florrie coaches Bobby to make Rims jealous by convincing him that she is going to marry someone else, and the trick works as Rims cancels his trip to marry Bobby. The marriage runs smoothly for several months until Bobby loses her job because of the war. The couple's mounting financial difficulties result in marital difficulties. Consequently, when Rims receives a letter from the Philippines, notifying him that the job is still open, Bobby, who has just learned she is pregnant, tears up the letter and conceals it and her pregnancy from Rims. The couple's finances take a turn for the worse when Rims receives a wage cut, forcing the newlyweds to consider moving into the senior Halevys already overcrowded apartment. This last financial blow is too great for Rims, who becomes embittered about losing his one chance at success in the Philippines. Feeling guilty, Bobby tells Rims about the letter offering him the position in Manila, and he lashes out at her with harsh recriminations. Fearful of telling Rims about her pregnancy, Bobby admits that she tricked him into marriage, and furious, he leaves for the Philippines. On the day that he is to sail for Manila, Rims confesses to his father-in-law that he really loves Bobby and would take her with him if he could afford it. Believing that he has failed his daughter, Pops stages a deliberate accident to collect the insurance money and keep the couple together. Although he is unhurt, Pop's sacrifice gives Rims new courage to face the future, and he decides to stay with Bobby. Realizing that Rims really does love her, Bobby finally tells him that she is expecting a baby.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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