Ex-Champ (1939)

72 mins | Drama | 16 June 1939

Director:

Phil Rosen

Cinematographer:

Elwood Bredell

Production Designer:

Jack Otterson

Production Company:

Universal Pictures Co.
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HISTORY

This picture was also reviewed as Ex Champ . A news item in HR notes that Charles Bickford and Stanley Fields were considered for the role of "Gunner." Another news item in HR adds that Noble "Kid" Chissell was a boxing champion in the Merchant ... More Less

This picture was also reviewed as Ex Champ . A news item in HR notes that Charles Bickford and Stanley Fields were considered for the role of "Gunner." Another news item in HR adds that Noble "Kid" Chissell was a boxing champion in the Merchant Marines. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 May 39
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 May 39
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 39
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 39
pp. 2
Hollywood Reporter
27 Mar 39
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Apr 39
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
16 May 39
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
22 May 39
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald
22 Apr 39
p. 35.
Motion Picture Herald
20 May 39
p. 43, 48
New York Times
12 May 39
p. 25.
Variety
17 May 39
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
[Sd] tech
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit publicity
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 June 1939
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 12 May 1939
Production Date:
27 March--13 April 1939
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co.
Copyright Date:
17 May 1939
Copyright Number:
LP8849
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
5314
SYNOPSIS

Once a tri-state boxing champ, Tom Gunner Grey has grown old but lives on the glories of his past. He has been both mother and father to his daughter Joan and son Jeff, but Jeff, whose education took every cent of the old man's earnings, would prefer to forget his father now that he is climbing the social ladder. While Gunner struggles as a hotel doorman, Jeff marries Doris Courtney, the banker's daughter, telling her that he is an orphan. Even though he is not invited to his own son's wedding, Gunner hocks his championship belt to buy him a present. Although heartbroken, Gunner pulls himself together in hopes of grooming his protege, Bob Hill, for the championship. Meanwhile, Jeff's ambition leads him to lose $60,000 of his client's money in the stock market. Learning that his son is facing jail, Gunner hurries to Jeff side. Gunner's loyalty forces Jeff to realize that he has misjudged his father, and he confesses all to Doris, who accepts the news with equinimity. In hopes of making enough money in bets to cover his son's financial deficit, Gunner decides to drug Bob, causing him to lose the championship, and place his bet on Olson, Bob's opponent. Gunner's plans go awry, however, when his buddy, Mushy Harrington, loyally places all bets on Bob and drinks the drugged water himself. Bob wins the championship, and with his winnings, Gunner bails his son out of trouble and opens his own restaurant. There the family is reconciled as Jeff and Doris toast Bob and Joan's forthcoming ... +


Once a tri-state boxing champ, Tom Gunner Grey has grown old but lives on the glories of his past. He has been both mother and father to his daughter Joan and son Jeff, but Jeff, whose education took every cent of the old man's earnings, would prefer to forget his father now that he is climbing the social ladder. While Gunner struggles as a hotel doorman, Jeff marries Doris Courtney, the banker's daughter, telling her that he is an orphan. Even though he is not invited to his own son's wedding, Gunner hocks his championship belt to buy him a present. Although heartbroken, Gunner pulls himself together in hopes of grooming his protege, Bob Hill, for the championship. Meanwhile, Jeff's ambition leads him to lose $60,000 of his client's money in the stock market. Learning that his son is facing jail, Gunner hurries to Jeff side. Gunner's loyalty forces Jeff to realize that he has misjudged his father, and he confesses all to Doris, who accepts the news with equinimity. In hopes of making enough money in bets to cover his son's financial deficit, Gunner decides to drug Bob, causing him to lose the championship, and place his bet on Olson, Bob's opponent. Gunner's plans go awry, however, when his buddy, Mushy Harrington, loyally places all bets on Bob and drinks the drugged water himself. Bob wins the championship, and with his winnings, Gunner bails his son out of trouble and opens his own restaurant. There the family is reconciled as Jeff and Doris toast Bob and Joan's forthcoming marriage. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.