The Beloved Brat (1938)

62 mins | Drama | 30 April 1938

Director:

Arthur Lubin

Writer:

Lawrence Kimble

Cinematographer:

George Barnes

Production Designer:

Stanley Fleischer

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The film's pre-release titles were Girls on Probation , not to be confused with the 1938 Warner Bros. film of the same title, and Too Much of Everything ... More Less

The film's pre-release titles were Girls on Probation , not to be confused with the 1938 Warner Bros. film of the same title, and Too Much of Everything . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
10 Feb 1938.
p. 3.
Film Daily
5 May 38
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Feb 38
p. 2.
Motion Picture Daily
11 Feb 38
p. 2.
Motion Picture Herald
19 Feb 38
p. 39.
New York Times
2 May 38
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
Contr to scr const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Too Much of Everything
Girls on Probation
Release Date:
30 April 1938
Production Date:
began mid September 1937
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 January 1938
Copyright Number:
LP7935
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
PCA No:
3789
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Although Roberta Morgan's parents give her everything money can buy, she is an unhappy child. Her parents are too busy for her, and her bratty behavior, which is actually an unspoken cry for love, only alienates them further. The only person to take any notice of her thirteenth birthday is her father's secretary, Williams. Roberta's only friends are a little black boy, Pinkie White, and his sister Arabella. When they take Roberta home with them, she is charmed by the warmth and love of their mother, Mrs. White, who unlike Mrs. Morgan, gives her children first priority. When Roberta tries to reciprocate by inviting Pinkie for dinner, however, Jenkins, the butler, angrily throws Pinkie out. Furious, Roberta acts even brattier, and after her parents leave for Europe, Jenkins locks her in her room. She runs away, but Jenkins tracks her to Pinkie's house. On the way home, Roberta and Jenkins argue and Roberta grabs the steering wheel causing the car to swerve into an oncoming car and kill the driver. At first, out of revenge, Roberta insists that Jenkins was drinking and the accident was all his fault, but after he is sentenced to prison, she confesses and is sent by the court to a special girls' school run by the enlightened Helen Cosgrove. Helen tries every method to reach Roberta and is about to give up when a talk with Williams convinces her to ask for Roberta's help with the younger students. Roberta loves her new duties and is delighted when she makes friends. By the time her parents return from Europe, Roberta has changed, but ... +


Although Roberta Morgan's parents give her everything money can buy, she is an unhappy child. Her parents are too busy for her, and her bratty behavior, which is actually an unspoken cry for love, only alienates them further. The only person to take any notice of her thirteenth birthday is her father's secretary, Williams. Roberta's only friends are a little black boy, Pinkie White, and his sister Arabella. When they take Roberta home with them, she is charmed by the warmth and love of their mother, Mrs. White, who unlike Mrs. Morgan, gives her children first priority. When Roberta tries to reciprocate by inviting Pinkie for dinner, however, Jenkins, the butler, angrily throws Pinkie out. Furious, Roberta acts even brattier, and after her parents leave for Europe, Jenkins locks her in her room. She runs away, but Jenkins tracks her to Pinkie's house. On the way home, Roberta and Jenkins argue and Roberta grabs the steering wheel causing the car to swerve into an oncoming car and kill the driver. At first, out of revenge, Roberta insists that Jenkins was drinking and the accident was all his fault, but after he is sentenced to prison, she confesses and is sent by the court to a special girls' school run by the enlightened Helen Cosgrove. Helen tries every method to reach Roberta and is about to give up when a talk with Williams convinces her to ask for Roberta's help with the younger students. Roberta loves her new duties and is delighted when she makes friends. By the time her parents return from Europe, Roberta has changed, but when Helen tells her that she will be allowed to go home, Roberta cries that her parents never loved her and refuses to go. The Morgans overhear her protests and, chastened, change their ways. At Roberta's next birthday party, they attend with all her new friends, including Pinkie, Arabella and Mrs. White, who has baked a beautiful cake. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.