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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were Keep Moving and Easy Street . The viewed print lacked directing and writing credits. Six-year-old Irene Dare was billed as the world's youngest ice skater. Victor Young was nominated for an Academy Award in the Music (Original Score) ... More Less

The working titles of this film were Keep Moving and Easy Street . The viewed print lacked directing and writing credits. Six-year-old Irene Dare was billed as the world's youngest ice skater. Victor Young was nominated for an Academy Award in the Music (Original Score) category. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 Aug 38
p. 3.
Film Daily
1 Sep 38
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Apr 38
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 38
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Jun 38
pp. 6-7.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Aug 38
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
2 Jul 38
p. 29.
Motion Picture Herald
27 Aug 38
p. 53.
New York Times
23 Sep 38
p. 35.
Variety
7 Sep 38
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
DANCE
Ice numbers staged by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Happy as a Lark," "Put Your Heart in a Song" and "The Sunny Side of Things," words and music by Frank Churchill and Paul F. Webster
"Tellin' My Troubles to a Mule" and "Goodbye My Dreams, Goodbye," words and music by Victor Young and Paul F. Webster.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Easy Street
Keep Moving
Release Date:
26 August 1938
Production Date:
late May--late June 1937
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80-81
Country:
United States
PCA No:
4393
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Although Pennsylvanian Mennonite Martha Martin longs to move to Goshen, Kansas to be near widower Henry Johnson, William Decker, her brother-in-law, refuses to lend her $92 for the train trip and writes a letter to Henry stating that if Henry wants to marry widow Martha, he should send the train fare himself. Embarrassed for his mother, little Tommy Martin tears up the letter and offers his collection of old newspapers to Samuel "Swapping Sam" Terwilliger, a wily, cheap "antique" dealer who gives the boy a dollar and, as a gift, a harmonica. That evening, the pious William punishes Tommy severely for accepting Sam's harmonica without earning it. Frustrated, Tommy runs away and convinces Sam to bring him to Philadelphia, where he hopes to earn the needed money. The next day, William discovers that a twenty-dollar bill, which had blown off a table and into Tommy's newspapers, is missing from his crop payment and denounces Tommy as a thief to Martha. In Philadelphia, Tommy lands a job as an ice skate boy in the rink that neighbors Sam's antique shop and later impresses the rink's owner, Mr. Kane, with his singing talents. Billed with six-year-old skater Irene Dare, Tommy is given a $25-per-week salary, of which Sam secretly takes twenty. When Tommy, who has been sending his earnings home, learns of Sam's deceit, he is crushed but returns home with all of his money. Scorned and branded as a thief by William, Tommy vows to prove his innocence before moving to Kansas. With help from a contrite Sam, Tommy, having determined that the ink-stained bill blew off the table, tracks the newspapers, which Sam ... +


Although Pennsylvanian Mennonite Martha Martin longs to move to Goshen, Kansas to be near widower Henry Johnson, William Decker, her brother-in-law, refuses to lend her $92 for the train trip and writes a letter to Henry stating that if Henry wants to marry widow Martha, he should send the train fare himself. Embarrassed for his mother, little Tommy Martin tears up the letter and offers his collection of old newspapers to Samuel "Swapping Sam" Terwilliger, a wily, cheap "antique" dealer who gives the boy a dollar and, as a gift, a harmonica. That evening, the pious William punishes Tommy severely for accepting Sam's harmonica without earning it. Frustrated, Tommy runs away and convinces Sam to bring him to Philadelphia, where he hopes to earn the needed money. The next day, William discovers that a twenty-dollar bill, which had blown off a table and into Tommy's newspapers, is missing from his crop payment and denounces Tommy as a thief to Martha. In Philadelphia, Tommy lands a job as an ice skate boy in the rink that neighbors Sam's antique shop and later impresses the rink's owner, Mr. Kane, with his singing talents. Billed with six-year-old skater Irene Dare, Tommy is given a $25-per-week salary, of which Sam secretly takes twenty. When Tommy, who has been sending his earnings home, learns of Sam's deceit, he is crushed but returns home with all of his money. Scorned and branded as a thief by William, Tommy vows to prove his innocence before moving to Kansas. With help from a contrite Sam, Tommy, having determined that the ink-stained bill blew off the table, tracks the newspapers, which Sam had used as "antique" chair stuffing, to a museum in Washington, D.C. Vindicated, Tommy says goodbye to Sam and his singing career and happily leaves for Kansas. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.